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So I have 2 functions and 1 class. with 1 function I want to Set value's of the integers stored in a class. with the other function I want to use these value's again. I'm using pointers as I thought this would be saved on Memory address's across the whole program.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


void Function1();
void Function2();
class TestClass
{
public:
    TestClass();
    ~TestClass();
    void SetValue(int localValue)
    {
        *value = localvalue;
    }
    int GetValue()const
    {
        return *value;
    }
private:
    *value;
};

TestClass::TestClass()
{
    value = new int(0);
}

TestClass:
~TestClass()
{
    delete value;
}

int main()
{
    TestClass *tommy = new TestClass; //this didn't work,
    //couldn't use SetValue or Getvalue in functions
    Function1();
    Function2();
    return 0;
}

void Function1()
{
    int randomvalue = 2;
    TestClass *tommy = new TestClass; //because it didnt work in main, i've put it here
    tommy->SetValue(randomvalue);
}

void Function2()
{
    TestClass *tommy = new TestClass;
    cout << tommy->GetValue();
            << endl; //this gave a error, so I put the above in    again
    //but this returns 0, so the value isn't changed
}

So, got a solution for me? I didn't got any compile errors, but the value isn't changed, probably because the destructor is called after Function1 has been completed. so how do I do it?

share|improve this question
    
Please be more specific. What exactly didn't work? Did you get an error message (if so, post it)? Did you get unexpected behavior (if so, describe it)? – Björn Pollex Oct 20 '13 at 22:50
    
Have you heard of indentation. Makes things readable – Ed Heal Oct 20 '13 at 22:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to pass your tommy from main() to each of your functions, not create a new one in each time, otherwise you're just losing the new Testclass objects you're creating in your functions, and actually here getting memory leaks because you use new.

Something like:

void Function1(TestClass * tommy) {
    int randomvalue =2;
    tommy->SetValue(randomvalue);
}

and then in main():

int main() {
    TestClass *tommy = new TestClass; 
    Function1(tommy);
    std::cout << tommy->GetValue() << std::endl;  //  Outputs 2
    delete tommy;
    return 0;
}

This is an odd use case, though - this would be the kind of thing you'd expect member functions to do. This would be better:

int main() {
    TestClass *tommy = new TestClass; 
    tommy->SetValue(2);
    std::cout << tommy->GetValue() << std::endl;  //  Outputs 2
    delete tommy;
    return 0;
}

without the need for Function1() and Function2(). Either way, you're going to have to fix:

private:
*value;

in your class, as someone else pointed out.

share|improve this answer
    
So, why use pointers in this case? – Chad Oct 20 '13 at 22:56
    
@Chad: Why indeed? Ask the OP, he said in his question he wanted to use them. That being said, I don't particularly agree that pointers are always to be avoided, but without seeing a real use case (meaning I doubt this is the entirety of the program he wants to write), there's not much I can do about forming a view on whether they're best here or not. – Paul Griffiths Oct 20 '13 at 22:57
    
I realize that SO is about answering direct questions, but this question as posted is obviously from someone with not much experience in C++. He's using pointers because he "thought this would be saved on Memory". We should be working to not just make "code that works", but code "that is better". – Chad Oct 20 '13 at 23:00
    
@Chad: As I edited, I doubt what he posted is intended to represent the complete functionality of his program. Without knowing what he's trying to do, it's probably best not to try to prejudge what would be "better", here. There are certainly places where pointers are the ideal solution, perhaps what he's trying to write is one of them, for all we know. We do tell people to post the shortest compilable example they can do demonstrate the problem. – Paul Griffiths Oct 20 '13 at 23:01
1  
@user2901207: You're welcome. Chad's advice is not bad, gratuitous use of pointers does tend to be avoided in modern C++, although I don't hold to the view that strenuous steps should be taken to avoid them. – Paul Griffiths Oct 20 '13 at 23:03

you are not passing your TestClass to either function so they functions can't see the tommy object you made. Then in each function you create a new local variable that just happens to have the same name as your local variable in main... They are all independent objects

share|improve this answer
    
ah, and as I answer this, below someone wrote the same thing with code. Choose his! – Jacob Minshall Oct 20 '13 at 22:55

Every time you write new TestClass, you are quite literally creating a new instance of a TestClass object. The new instance is not related to any existing instances in any way, except for being of the same type. To make the single instance of TestClass be "the one" being used by your functions, you need to pass it in as an argument to those functions.

Also -- Don't use pointers unless it is absolutely necessary.

Here's a cleaned up example of your code that accomplishes what it appears you were trying.

class TestClass
{
   int value;

public:
   TestClass() : value(0)
   {}

   int GetValue() const { return value; }
   void SetValue(int x) { value = x; }
};

// takes a "reference", works somewhat like a pointer but with
// some additional safety guarantees (most likely will not be null)
// This will modify the original passed in TestClass instance.
void SetRandomValue(TestClass& tc)
{
   int random = 2; // not really random...
   tc.SetValue(random);
}

// take a const reference, similar to above comment, but a const
// reference cannot be modified in this scope
void Print(const TestClass& tc)
{
   std::cout << tc.GetValue() << "\n";
}

int main()
{
   // create a TestClass instance with automatic storage duration
   // no need to use a pointer, or dynamic allocation
   TestClass tc;

   // Modify the instance (using reference)
   SetRandomValue(tc);

   // print the instance (using const reference)       
   Print(tc);

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why has this been downvoted? It's perfectly valid and good advice. – acron Oct 20 '13 at 22:52
    
It wasnt me who downvoted but this does not answer OP why he had to write new TestClass 3 times. – Agent_L Oct 20 '13 at 22:59
    
@Agent_L, true enough. Edited. – Chad Oct 20 '13 at 23:03

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