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How to retrieve the data from domain_cx in domaine , once I'm in the function get_domaine(...) I have tried the following, but the result isnt what expected (0-2 instead of 0-2 3). Here is my code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int get_domaine(char * domaine)
{
  char (*ptr_dom)[10];
  ptr_dom = (char (*)[10]) domaine;
  printf("%s ", ptr_dom[0]); // will print
  printf("%s ", ptr_dom[1]); // will not print even thought there is data.
  return 1;
}

int main(int argc,char * argv[])
{
   char *domaine_cx[10];

   domaine_cx[0] = "0-2";
   domaine_cx[1] = "3";

  if(get_domaine((char *)*domaine_cx)) printf("Ok");
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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I edited it, it does compile now. –  maximegir Oct 20 '13 at 23:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are trying to cast char (*) [10] to char * just so that you can try to cast it back afterwards. Much simpler would be changing the prototype of your function instead:

int get_domaine(char* domaine[10])
{
    printf("%s ", domaine[0]);
    printf("%s ", domaine[1]);
    return 1;
}

and in main:

if (get_domaine(domaine_cx))
    printf("Ok");

Alternatively you might not pass an array of any size and pass the size in other argument explicitly:

int get_domaine(char* domaine[], int tokens)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < tokens; ++i)
        printf("%s ", domaine[i]);
    return 1;
}

and in main:

if (get_domaine(domaine_cx, 2))
    printf("Ok");

And in case you really can not change the prototype, than this evil cast would do:

int get_domaine(char* domaine)
{
    char** myEvilPtr = (char**) domaine;       // !!! we don't know the size !!!
    printf("%s ", myEvilPtr[0]);
    printf("%s ", myEvilPtr[1]);
    return 1;
}

and since arrays decay into pointers, in main you could still do simple:

if (get_domaine(domaine_cx))
    printf("Ok");
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try function declaration int get_domaine(char* domaine[]), or get_domaine(char** domaine) –  elgonzo Oct 20 '13 at 23:23
1  
I have no control over the signature, unfortunately –  maximegir Oct 20 '13 at 23:23
    
Since i know the size of the array of char* I can cast it to a pointer to a char (the first char) , knowing the size , can't I use it from that pointer to a char ? –  maximegir Oct 20 '13 at 23:29
    
@user2827260: As far as I'm aware, there are no guarantees that a char * will be the same size as a char **, although on most systems you'll encounter that will be the case. As such, anything you can do will probably be undefined behavior. –  icktoofay Oct 20 '13 at 23:32
1  
@elgonzo: You can't cast pointers around willy-nilly. You can cast a pointer to something to a pointer to char, a pointer to void, back to whatever it originally was pointing to, and, as far as I know, nothing else without triggering undefined behavior. Furthermore, as far as I know, the standard gives no guarantees to sizes of pointers beyond that a void * is big enough to hold any other pointer. –  icktoofay Oct 20 '13 at 23:36

Regarding your statement:

domaine_cx[0] = "0-2";

Here are some other ways to make assignments. Using string functions such as strcpy():

strcpy(domaine_cx[0], "0-2");
strcpy(domaine_cx[1], "3");

Or using format strings such as this:

sprintf(domaine_cx[0], "%s", "0-2");

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Thanks, was still editing. That mis-statement has been fixed. –  ryyker Oct 20 '13 at 23:24
1  
"char *domaine_cx[10]; is an array of char *" Correct. "Each array member will only hold one char" Incorrect. –  Kevin Oct 20 '13 at 23:25
1  
Your edit doesn't make sense. You assign char's (a single byte value) to array elements who should be char pointers. This might end in Access Violations if those array elements will be resolved according to their type: char pointers/strings. -- You would probably get more downvotes... –  elgonzo Oct 20 '13 at 23:30
1  
Whatever you drink, please stop your edits. It just got worse. can it become even worser...? –  elgonzo Oct 20 '13 at 23:38
1  
@ryyker: Any answer with a net score of −3 or lower is grayed out. I retracted my downvote, so if you refresh, it will no longer be grayed out. –  icktoofay Oct 21 '13 at 0:26

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