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I am working through the book "Cracking the Coding Interview" and I have come across questions here asking for answers, but I need help comparing my answer to the solution. My algorithm works, but I am having difficulty understand the solution in the book. Mainly because I don't understand what some of the operators are really doing.

The task is: "Implement an algorithm to determine if a string has all unique characters. What if you cannot use additional data structures?"

This is my solution:

public static boolean checkForUnique(String str){
    boolean containsUnique = false;

    for(char c : str.toCharArray()){
        if(str.indexOf(c) == str.lastIndexOf(c)){
            containsUnique = true;
        } else {
            containsUnique = false;
        }
    }

    return containsUnique;
}

It works, but how efficient is this? I saw that the complexity of the index functions for String in Java are O(n*m)

Here is the solution from the book:

public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
    if (str.length() > 256) {
        return false;
    }
    int checker = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
        if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) return false;
        checker |= (1 << val);
    }
    return true;
}

A couple things I am not quite understanding with the solution. First, what does the "|=" operator do? Why is 'a' subtracted from the current character in the string for the value of "val"? I know "<<" is a bitwise left shift, but what does (checker & (1<<val)) do? I know it is bitwise and, but I am not understanding it since I am not understanding the line where checker gets a value.

I am just not familiar with these operations and unfortunately the book does not give an explanation of the solutions, probably because it assumes you already understand these operations.

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4  
I know Google filters out special characters, but you can use symbolhound.com to do the equivalent of a Google search for special characters like |= or &. –  levininja Oct 21 '13 at 0:13
1  
@levininja wow than you so much for that. It was driving me crazy to not be able to google it. I wish I thought of googling "how to search with special characters" lol –  Seephor Oct 21 '13 at 0:17
    
Moral: don't believe everything you read. The answer isn't necessarily right, or even good, just because it appears in a book. :-) –  Adam Liss Oct 21 '13 at 0:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

There are two separate questions here: what's the efficiency of your solution, and what is the reference solution doing? Let's treat each independently.

First, your solution:

public static boolean checkForUnique(String str){
    boolean containsUnique = false;

    for(char c : str.toCharArray()){
        if(str.indexOf(c) == str.lastIndexOf(c)){
            containsUnique = true;
        } else {
            containsUnique = false;
        }
    }

    return containsUnique;
}

Your solution essentially consists of a loop over all characters in the string (let's say there are n of them), checking on each iteration whether the first and last index of the characters are the same. The indexOf and lastIndexOf methods each take time O(n), because they have to scan across all the characters of the string to determine if any of them match the one you're looking for. Therefore, since your loop runs O(n) times and does O(n) work per iteration, its runtime is O(n2).

However, there's something iffy about your code. Try running it on the string aab. Does it work correctly on this input? As a hint, as soon as you determine that there are two or more duplicated characters, you're guaranteed that there are duplicates and you can return that not all characters are unique.

Now, let's look at the reference:

public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
    if (str.length() > 256) { // NOTE: Are you sure this isn't 26?
        return false;
    }
    int checker = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
        if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) return false;
        checker |= (1 << val);
    }
    return true;
}

This solution is cute. The basic idea is the following: imagine that you have an array of 26 booleans, each one tracking whether a particular character has appeared in the string already. You start with all of them false. You then iterate across the characters of the string, and each time you see a character you look into the array slot for that character. If it's false, this is the first time you've seen the character and you can set the slot to true. If it's true, you've already seen this character and you can immediately report that there's a duplicate.

Notice that this method doesn't allocate an array of booleans. Instead, it opts for a clever trick. Since there are only 26 different characters possible and there are 32 bits in an int, the solution creates an int variable where each bit of the variable corresponds to one of the characters in the string. Instead of reading and writing an array, the solution reads and writes the bits of the number.

For example, look at this line:

if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) return false;

What does checker & (1 << val) do? Well, 1 << val creates an int value that has all bits zero except for the valth bit. It then uses bitwise AND to AND this value with checker. If the bit at position val in checker is already set, then this evaluates to a nonzero value (meaning we've already seen the number) and we can return false. Otherwise, it evaluates to 0, and we haven't seen the number.

The next line is this:

checker |= (1 << val);

This uses the "bitwise OR with assignment" operator, which is equivalent to

checker = checker | (1 << val);

This ORs checker with a value that has a 1 bit set only at position val, which turns the bit on. It's equivalent to setting the valth bit of the number to 1.

This approach is much faster than yours. First, since the function starts off by checking if the string has length greater than 26 (I'm assuming the 256 is a typo), the function never has to test any string of length 27 or greater. Therefore, the inner loop runs at most 26 times. Each iteration does O(1) work in bitwise operations, so the overall work done is O(1) (O(1) iterations times O(1) work per iteration), which is significantly faster than your implementation.

If you haven't seen bitwise operations used this way, I'd recommend searching for "bitwise operators" on Google to learn more.

Hope this helps!

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thank you for the comprehensive answer. unfortunately the book does not give any information on restrictions other than the sentence I provided. I don't think I would have ever thought of the book's solution, but I am not sure if I should be worried about that.. –  Seephor Oct 21 '13 at 1:01
    
@Seephor- I wouldn't worry about it. That solution is a bit hacky and hard to read, and you wouldn't want to write it unless you were 100% sure that the input consisted purely of lower-case letters and that the function was so time-critical it warranted an aggressively optimized solution. –  templatetypedef Oct 21 '13 at 1:02
    
The 'int checker' is a bit hacky, but actually it can be replaced by a array of boolean or even a hash map with almost equivalent performance. –  Pham Trung Oct 21 '13 at 1:54

The book solution is one I don't like and I believe is dysfunctional..... templatetypedef has posted a comprehensive answer which indicates that the solution is a good one. I disagree, since the book's answer assumes that the string only has lower-case characters, (ascii) and does no validation to ensure that.

public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
    // short circuit - supposed to imply that
    // there are no more than 256 different characters.
    // this is broken, because in Java, char's are Unicode,
    // and 2-byte values so there are 32768 values
    // (or so - technically not all 32768 are valid chars)
    if (str.length() > 256) {
        return false;
    }
    // checker is used as a bitmap to indicate which characters
    // have been seen already
    int checker = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        // set val to be the difference between the char at i and 'a'
        // unicode 'a' is 97
        // if you have an upper-case letter e.g. 'A' you will get a
        // negative 'val' which is illegal
        int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
        // if this lowercase letter has been seen before, then
        // the corresponding bit in checker will have been set and
        // we can exit immediately.
        if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) return false;
        // set the bit to indicate we have now seen the letter.
        checker |= (1 << val);
    }
    // none of the characters has been seen more than once.
    return true;
}

The bottom line, given templatedef's answer too, is that there's not actually enough information to determine whether the book's answer is right.

I distrust it though.

templatedef's answer on the complexity is one I agree with though.... ;-)

EDIT: As an exercise, I converted the book's answer to one that will work (albeit slower than the book's answer - BigInteger is slow).... This version does the same logic as the book's, but does not have the same validation and assumption problems (but it is slower). It is useful to show the logic too.

public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
    if (str.length() > 32768) {
        return false;
    }
    BigInteger checker = new BigInteger(0);
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        int val = str.charAt(i);
        if (checker.testBit(val)) return false;
        checker = checker.setBit(val);
    }
    // none of the characters has been seen more than once.
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The question was stated without more context, and I'm assuming in the book that it made these restrictions more explicit. –  templatetypedef Oct 21 '13 at 0:37
    
I am guessing you are right (and I was part way though my answer whn your's came up). But, the book's solution is a really good example of what not to do. –  rolfl Oct 21 '13 at 0:38
1  
@templatetypedef the book makes no other mention on restrictions. It is literally the one sentence I provided. –  Seephor Oct 21 '13 at 0:54

Since a char value can hold one of only 256 different values, any string that's longer than 256 characters must contain at least one duplicate.

The remainder of the code uses checker as a sequence of bits, with each bit representing one character. It seems to convert each character to an integer, starting with a = 1. It then checks the corresponding bit in checker. If it's set, it means that character has already been seen, and we therefore know that the string contains at least one duplicate character. If the character hasn't yet been seen, the code sets the corresponding bit in checker and continues.

Specifically, (1<<val) generates an integer with a single 1 bit in position val. For example, (1<<3) would be binary 1000, or 8. The expression checker & (1<<val) will return zero if the bit in position val is not set (that is, has value 0) in checker, and (1<<val), which is always non-zero, if that bit is set. The expression checker |= (1<<val) will set that bit in checker.

However, the algorithm seems to be flawed: it doesn't seem to account for the uppercase characters and punctuation (which generally come before the lowercase ones lexicographically). It would also seem to require a 256-bit integer, which is not standard.

As rolfl mentions in the comment below, I prefer your solution because it works. You can optimize it by returning false as soon as you identify a non-unique character.

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1  
I would add to that: the checker is a 32-bit variable, and the high bit is the sign bit, so the value could also be negative (> 0 test is broken). As far as I am concerned, the OP has the better solution simply because it works, even though it is O(n^2) –  rolfl Oct 21 '13 at 0:20
1  
@rolfl- I think that the 256 is an error. There are only 26 possible characters that can occur, and I don't think the solution is designed to work with characters outside that range. –  templatetypedef Oct 21 '13 at 0:24
    
As the algo substract letter a, I think it checks only lower case letters, not numbers, uppercases, special characters... –  GuillaumeA Oct 21 '13 at 0:28
    
Agreed, as templatetypedef mentioned. But if that's the case, it should verify its input. –  Adam Liss Oct 21 '13 at 0:29
2  
As a second comment, a char in Java is 2 bytes, and has 32768 possible values, not 256 –  rolfl Oct 21 '13 at 0:33

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