Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One of my class variables is a 2D array. The size depends on the user input. The user may input size which may exceed his hardware limit. So I want to handle this properly. Is the following code correct?

        int counter;
        try
        {
            int size = 20000;//this is actually from user input
            array = new double*[size];
            for(counter = 0; counter < size; counter++)
                array[counter] = new double[size];
        }
        catch(std::bad_alloc)
        {
            try
            {
                for(int i = 0; i < counter; i++)
                    delete[] array([i]);

                delete[] array;
                array = NULL;

                //display limitation message
                size = 2;
                array = new double*[size];
                for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
                    array[i] = new double[size];
            }
            //catch again & exit application
        }
share|improve this question
1  
Why not use std::vector? –  Sam Oct 21 '13 at 3:50
    
Use std::vector for nonsense-free code. –  n.m. Oct 21 '13 at 3:50
    
A program is correct if it implements its specification. (And usually, there are some unspoken parts of a specification, like that the program doesn't invoke undefined behaviors or outright crash). What is your specification? Are you asking whether your strategy for dealing with the allocation errors is a good strategy (as implemented in your program), or are you asking whether the intent/strategy that can be deduced from your code is actually implemented properly by the code? –  Kaz Oct 21 '13 at 4:06
    
The code is not correct because counter is not in scope in all the places where it is referenced. Unless there is some other counter elsewhere, it will not compile. –  Kaz Oct 21 '13 at 4:12
    
@Kaz, sorry that was a typo... :( The counter variable is now in scope & there is only one counter variable. –  Cool_Coder Oct 21 '13 at 4:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your best bet is:

std::vector<std::vector<double>>  array(size, std::vector<double>(size));

But if you must do it manually then:

void init_array(int size)
{
    int counter;
    try
    {
        array = new double*[size];

        // Don't shadow counter here.
        for(counter = 0; counter < size; counter++)
        {
            array[counter] = new double[size];
        }
    }
    catch(std::bad_alloc)
    {
        // delete in reverse order to mimic other containers.
        for(--counter; counter >= 0;--counter)
        {
            delete[] array[counter];
        }

        delete[] array;

        // retry the call with a smaller size.
        // A loop would also work. Depending on context.
        // Don't nest another try{} catch block. because your code will
        // just get convoluted.
        init_array(size/2);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry that was a typo... The counter variable is the same everywhere, i.e. there is only one counter variable. –  Cool_Coder Oct 21 '13 at 5:00
    
And I did not understand why you are deleteing in reverse order? –  Cool_Coder Oct 21 '13 at 5:01
    
I am not using vector because my application is for scientific computing & the vector may not give the best performance compared to double array. Your opinion on this? –  Cool_Coder Oct 21 '13 at 5:03
    
@Cool_Coder: I think you are under the misaprehension that vector is slower than an array. This is not correct. See stackoverflow.com/a/3664349/14065 –  Loki Astari Oct 21 '13 at 6:29
    
@Cool_Coder: Delete in reverse order because when the compiler allocates objects. It will write to de-allocate in the reverse order of creation. For doubles it is not a big deal but it is a convention worth following for maintenance reasons. –  Loki Astari Oct 21 '13 at 6:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.