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I'm looking for some succinct, modern C# code to generate a random date between Jan 1 1995 and the current date.

I'm thinking some solution that utilizes Enumerable.Range somehow may make this more succinct.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 102 down vote accepted
DateTime RandomDay()
{
    DateTime start = new DateTime(1995, 1, 1);
    Random gen = new Random();

    int range = (DateTime.Today - start).Days;           
    return start.AddDays(gen.Next(range));
}

For better performance if this will be called repeatedly, create the start and gen (and maybe even range) variables outside of the function.

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Thanks, Joel! That's what I was looking for. –  Judah Himango Oct 12 '08 at 0:17
    
Random is only pseudo-random. If you need truly random, try using RNGCryptoServiceProvider from the System.Security.Cryptography namespace. –  tvanfosson Oct 12 '08 at 0:37
5  
Actually, Random isn't even particularly pseudo-random unless you keep the instance around for a while and keep getting values out of it. –  David Mitchell Oct 15 '08 at 14:23
1  
Which is why this is only a sample, rather than production code. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 23 '08 at 13:10
1  
Yep, that works for me; my real-world code will have the Random instance outside the method itself. –  Judah Himango Jun 1 '09 at 22:03
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This is in slight response to Joel's comment about making a slighly more optimized version. Instead of returning a random date directly, why not return a generator function which can be called repeatedly to create a random date.

Func<DateTime> RandomDayFunc()
{
    DateTime start = new DateTime(1995, 1, 1); 
    Random gen = new Random(); 
    int range = ((TimeSpan)(DateTime.Today - start)).Days; 
    return () => start.AddDays(gen.Next(range));
}
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Can you explain how this is beneficial? Couldn't start, gen, and range be class members instead? –  Mark A. Nicolosi Oct 12 '08 at 3:51
    
They could and in this case they are. Under the hood this will generate a lexical closure which is a clrass containing start,gen and range as members. This is just more concise. –  JaredPar Oct 12 '08 at 16:32
    
Nice encapsulation. –  Drew Noakes Oct 23 '08 at 8:08
    
Nice function, I'm just hoping that nobody is going to use it as: for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) { array[i].DateProp = RandomDayFunc()(); } –  Aidiakapi Mar 29 at 11:54
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Start with a fixed date object (Jan 1, 1995), and add a random number of days with AddDays (obviusly, pay attention not surpassing the current date).

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Thanks Friol. I was gonna ask how to limit the number passed into random. Joel has posted an example with code sample, so I'll mark his response as the answer. –  Judah Himango Oct 12 '08 at 0:18
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Well, if you gonna present alternate optimization, we can also go for an iterator:

 static IEnumerable<DateTime> RandomDay()
 {
    DateTime start = new DateTime(1995, 1, 1);
    Random gen = new Random();
    int range = ((TimeSpan)(DateTime.Today - start)).Days;
    while (true)
    	yield return  start.AddDays(gen.Next(range));        
}

you could use it like this:

int i=0;
foreach(DateTime dt in RandomDay())
{
    Console.WriteLine(dt);
    if (++i == 10)
    	break;
}
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One thing to consider between an iterator vs. a generator function is that the iterator solution will produce an IDisposable value. This forces the caller to dispose or pay the price of having a finalizer live in the GC. The generator needs no disposing –  JaredPar Oct 12 '08 at 21:05
    
@JaredPar, that's not quite right. Just because a type implements IDisposable does not mean it is finalizable. –  Drew Noakes Oct 23 '08 at 8:10
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