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Working in Ruby, I'm trying to make it so when I enter a line of input it'll read it and match it with a few if statements.

input_stream = $stdin

input_stream.each_line do |line|  

  puts line

  if line == "a"
    puts "test 1"
  end
  if line == "b"
    puts "test 2"
  end
end

But when I run it, and enter in "a" or "b", this is the output

a
a
b
b

It recognizes that I entered a and b, and prints it back to me, but the if statements don't function as expected. What is the problem here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ruby maintains the newline when using each_line. The simplest solution is to drop it with chomp.

input_stream = $stdin

input_stream.each_line do |line|  
  line.chomp! # The new helpful line

  puts line

  if line == "a"
    puts "test 1"
  end
  if line == "b"
    puts "test 2"
  end
end
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that was it, thanks! –  user2901861 Oct 21 '13 at 5:46

Because line has \n character at the end if you write this it will work:

input_stream = $stdin

input_stream.each_line do |line|  

  puts line

  if line.chomp == "a"
    puts "test 1"
  end
  if line.chomp == "b"
    puts "test 2"
  end
end
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1  
That \n is not a symbol, it is a character. In Ruby symbols look like :symbol with the colon in front of the name of the symbol. In a Hash as a key we can have convenience of creating a symbol like this key: value where value in this case would be a variable (or possibly a method call) and the rest is Ruby history. –  vgoff Oct 21 '13 at 6:48
    
thanks, @vgoff - i've fixed –  Alexander Kobelev Oct 21 '13 at 19:44

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