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I have a list of strings. All of the strings have whitespace that needs to be converted to underscores. I am fully capable of using a for or foreach loop to do this. I am still relatively new to C# and would like to become more familiar with it. With that said, my question is:

How can I get the following code to work in .NET 2.0? When I check fieldList at the end of the ConvertAll operation, nothing has changed. Is there an issue with passing the string by value instead of reference?

string fields =
  "First Name,Middle Name,Last Name,Birth Date,Gender,Address,City,State,Zip,Email";
List<string> fieldList = new List<string>(fields.Split(','));
fieldList.ConvertAll<string>(new Converter<string, string>(
    delegate(string str)
    {
        str = str.Trim();
        str = str.Replace(' ', '_');
        return str;
    }
));

Please, keep in mind, that I am using .NET 2.0 and cannot currently switch, so I do not have the luxury of using LINQ or Lambdas.

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2 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You need to assign the results of the ConvertAll method to the variable like this:

fieldList = fieldList.ConvertAll<string>(new Converter<string, string>(
    delegate(string str)
    {
        str = str.Trim();
        str = str.Replace(' ', '_');
        return str;
    }
));

The ConvertAll method returns a new List<T> so you need to assign the result of the method. If you want to re-use the fieldList variable you can but it may be better to create a new variable to improve the clarity of your code:

List<String> convertedFieldList 
    = fieldList.ConvertAll<string>(new Converter<string, string>(
        delegate(string str)
        {
            str = str.Trim();
            str = str.Replace(' ', '_');
            return str;
        }
));

As Marc Gravell points out in a comment below, you can simplify the syntax of this expression by doing this:

List<String> convertedFieldList 
    = fieldList.ConvertAll<String>(delegate(String str) {
            return str.Trim().Replace(' ', '_');
        });
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7  
Just for completeness, you can simplify to ...ConvertAll<string>(delegate (string str) { ... }); –  Marc Gravell Dec 22 '09 at 20:35
    
@Marc - Good to point out :) –  Andrew Hare Dec 22 '09 at 20:37
    
I got this error: The type arguments for method 'System.Collections.Generic.List.ConvertAll(System.Converter)' cannot be inferred from the usage. Try specifying the type arguments explicitly. –  kzh Dec 22 '09 at 20:59
    
Sorry, I fixed the error. I am used to using version 4 of the C# compiler :) –  Andrew Hare Dec 22 '09 at 21:02
    
I re-added the new Converter. fieldList = fieldList.ConvertAll<string>(new Converter<string, string>( delegate(string str) { return str.Trim().Replace(' ', '_'); } )); –  kzh Dec 22 '09 at 21:02
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ConvertAll doesn't change the input list. It returns a new list containing the converted stuff. By the way, you can remove the new Converter<string,string> with C# 2.0+:

List<string> converted = fieldList.ConvertAll<string>
    (delegate(string s) { return s.Trim().Replace(' ', '_'); });

Besides, nothing prevents you from using a C# 3.0 compiler and LINQBridge and target .NET 2.0.

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For some reason, C# 2.0 could not infer the type without the new Converter declaration. –  kzh Dec 22 '09 at 21:03
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