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Say I've got the following complex type

<xs:complexType name="matrix">
    <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:extension base="xs:string">
            <xs:attribute name="rows" type="xs:integer" use="required" />
            <xs:attribute name="cols" type="xs:integer" use="required" />
        </xs:extension>
    </xs:simpleContent>
</xs:complexType>

This represents a matrix, where the idea is that I can then fill it out something like this (for a 2x2 matrix for example):

<matrix rows=2 cols=2>1,2,3,4</matrix>

Now say I wanted to make an element based on this type, something like

<xs:element name="eulerangles" type="matrix">

In this case, I would still need to explicitly set the rows and cols attribute, but this element will always have 3 rows and 3 columns. Is it possible somehow to have the attributes set to a specific number in the schema, so that I wouldn't need to explicitly specify that I want 3 rows and 3 columns

i.e. instead of having to write this:

<eulerangles rows=3 cols=3>1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9</eulerangles>

I would like to be able to write like this

<eulerangles>1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9</eulerangles>

While still having the eulerangles be of type "matrix" with 3 rows and 3 cols

Note: I'm very new to XML and XSD. I would really appreciate any comments that would help improve my style.

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2 Answers 2

The closest you might get in XSD 1.0 is a model such as this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<!-- XML Schema generated by QTAssistant/XSD Module (http://www.paschidev.com) -->
<xs:schema targetNamespace="http://tempuri.org/XMLSchema.xsd" xmlns="http://tempuri.org/XMLSchema.xsd" elementFormDefault="qualified" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <xs:complexType name="matrixbase">
        <xs:simpleContent>
            <xs:extension base="xs:string">
                <xs:attribute name="rows" type="xs:integer"/>
                <xs:attribute name="cols" type="xs:integer"/>
            </xs:extension>
        </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="matrix">
        <xs:simpleContent>
            <xs:restriction base="matrixbase">
                <xs:attribute name="rows" type="xs:integer" use="required"/>
                <xs:attribute name="cols" type="xs:integer" use="required"/>
            </xs:restriction>
        </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>


    <xs:complexType name="eulerangles">
        <xs:simpleContent>
            <xs:restriction base="matrixbase">
                <xs:attribute name="rows" type="xs:integer" use="prohibited"/>
                <xs:attribute name="cols" type="xs:integer" use="prohibited"/>
            </xs:restriction>
        </xs:simpleContent>
    </xs:complexType>
</xs:schema>

Once you declare attributes required, there is no way to make them "disappear" in a subtype. The solution might be to rebase the hierarchy (matrixbase), having the base type declaring the attributes optional; and then make them mandatory (matrix) or prohibited (eulerangles, quaternion, etc.) as per your other established ones.

share|improve this answer
    
In your example, if rows and columns are prohibited, does that mean they're not actually set to 3 (or any value at all), and that they're not part of the eulerangles type anymore? –  9a3eedi Oct 23 '13 at 4:55
    
@9a3eedi, yes, it means they're not not applicable, therefore not set as part of PSVI. I took your point as being for well known matrixes (me reinforcing the point by mentioning quaternion), there is no point in providing the rows and cols since it would be superfluous - the characteristics of these matrices are established a priori. My experience tells me to avoid default and fixed values in XSD since it ends up promoting implementations that imply PSVI which is in fact very limiting. I also don't believe those that say it is a good documentation mechanism (I prefer annotations). –  Petru Gardea Oct 23 '13 at 11:48

I think you should be able to do this:

<xs:complexType name="eulerangles">
    <xs:simpleContent>
        <xs:restriction base="matrix">
            <xs:attribute name="rows" type="xs:integer" fixed="3"/>
            <xs:attribute name="cols" type="xs:integer" fixed="3"/>
        </xs:restriction>
    </xs:simpleContent>
</xs:complexType>

In XSD 1.1 you could add the assertion

<xs:assert test="count(tokenize($value, ',')) = @rows * @cols"/>
share|improve this answer
    
The matrix would have to have the attributes "relaxed" from required to optional (otherwise the restriction you offered is not valid); having a fixed value would work in terms of XSD; it would allow though for valid XML that may still look clumsy (providing only one of rows, cols). The interesting thing (for me at least) that I didn't realize until your post was that the use="prohibited" with a fixed value is valid (the spec doesn't seem to imply otherwise,.NET and Xerces) yet this combination seems useless since the fixed value cannot be used in any way (for e.g. to populate the PSVI). –  Petru Gardea Oct 21 '13 at 18:43
    
Why would it need to be relaxed to optional? The values are still guaranteed to be provided if they were fixed, so you'd think it would satisfy the "required" requirement. –  9a3eedi Oct 23 '13 at 5:15
    
Well, I just tested the code on a validator and indeed you're right.. I had to relax the matrix to optional, which I might consider doing. However, I didn't understand what you meant by it being useless. If I had to parse an XML that is validated with this schema using a typical library, does this mean that the parser won't be able to identify a eulerangle element as a matrix type having 3 rows and 3 columns? –  9a3eedi Oct 23 '13 at 5:25
    
@9a3eedi, the "useless" was only referring to allowing the fixed attribute to apply in the prohibited case, vis-à-vis PSVI. –  Petru Gardea Oct 23 '13 at 11:51

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