Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I come from Java / Objective-C to PHP and find it horrible. I mean, PHP is nice, really. But when you look at a bunch of variables, you don't know: Is that an number? Is that an string? Or ist that even a fancy object that can perform actions when calling methods on it?

So I wonder if there are helpful re-usable naming conventions for variables to help figure out if something is an object, or if something is just a boring variable. I'd say if something is an object, i.e. an instance of a class, the first character must be BIG. But it's just a guess. Hope to read some tips from PHP pros :-)

share|improve this question
    
Number or a String ? Well, it can be both, depending on where you are in your script (variables are not as strongly typed as in JAVA). –  Pascal MARTIN Dec 22 '09 at 21:08
5  
The real naming issue with PHP is the completely inconsistent naming schemes and parameter orders in the built-in library. –  phoebus Dec 22 '09 at 21:11
3  
There are no enforced naming conventions in Objective-C whatsoever, so this is mostly in your head. –  Azeem.Butt Dec 22 '09 at 21:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

As in other languages, there is no single coding standard in PHP. You can, among others (see the comments), check out the Zend coding standards, they are quite highly regarded as they are very close to (and partly identical with) the PHP core development team.

share|improve this answer
    
add PEAR please: pear.php.net/manual/en/standards.php –  Gordon Dec 22 '09 at 21:11
1  
I also stick to the Zend coding guidelines: camelCasedVariables , This_Class_Naming_Scheme, BIG_CONSTANTS and identifiers that actually tell you what they represent like $databaseConnection instead of $dbc. –  lnwdr Dec 22 '09 at 21:17

What's to prevent you from using the conventions you're already familiar with? It's likely that there is nothing unique to PHP that you've not already witnessed before.

share|improve this answer

I usually stick to this simple rule

Meaningfull Camel Case Variable names (with type prefix before) ex : intNbDaysLeft would be good for an integer

share|improve this answer
    
Yuck! How'd you prefix a variable holding a Zend_Gdata_MimeBodyString then? :) –  Gordon Dec 22 '09 at 21:33
    
When the dataType is long and complex, I usually take the first letter of each word. So you'de get something like zgmbsVariable. Some people reduce it only to the first 3 letter, or what we do is prepend an o for Object + a meaningfull name. Again, I insist on MEANINGFULL. If you understand what you are writing and other people do,then it's fine. It's all a matter of how you're used to work. –  David Brunelle Dec 22 '09 at 21:46
    
Meaningful + systems hungarian? I'm pretty sure that's an oxymoron. –  Johrn Dec 22 '09 at 23:14

I use Zend Eclipse, so I describe my variables like this, to make sure they're intellisensed. Then, I worry less about, "what is this?"

/**
 * @var Zend_Form_Element
 */
protected $_member;

or

/**
 * @param Zend_Form_Element $input
 */
function do_it( $input )

or

$my_var = some_function(); /* @var $my_var Zend_Form_Element */
share|improve this answer
2  
That is PHPDoc, not "Zend Eclipse convention." –  chelmertz Dec 22 '09 at 21:21

You should quickly discover that there is little type hinting in PHP, and the reason for that is clear, in this dynamic language type can change, so name is not very important.

Using PHPDoc with Eclipse or NetBeans helps, but you cant rely on that, if you want to be sure that Your variable is of specific type, you have to check it (is_array(), instanceof, ect.).

Also, PHP does a lot for you, it will convert betwen types on Your behalf, it will act differently depending on the type.

PHP mostly works with strings, so most variables are of that type. Applications can have lots of types, but a single method shouldn't use too many. If you find yourself using so many objects that you cant easily keep track of their instance names, then it's some design problem, not naming convention issue.

If you want to be sure you have not used some variable wrongly, be sure to unit test. The standard in PHP is phpunit

share|improve this answer
    
"PHP mostly works with strings, so most variables are of that type" ... [Citation needed] –  nickf Dec 22 '09 at 23:17

My favourite PHP naming convention is the one where “PHP” is always called “huge pile of cr— that we wouldn’t touch with a bargepole”.

share|improve this answer
    
there's always one, isn't there –  nickf Dec 22 '09 at 23:19
1  
Uh oh, tough crowd. –  Paul D. Waite Dec 22 '09 at 23:40
    
Yep, tough - but if we allow for these answers, all of SO will become one big bad joke, since there are opinions like this for every programming question. –  Sam May 10 '10 at 7:18
    
NOES DAT IZ NOT TRUE RUBY IS DA BOMB IF STACKSOVERLFLWO WAS WRITTEN I RUBY NOONE WOULD EVER WRITEBAD STUFFS BECAUSE THE RUBY MAGICK WOULD STOP THEM LOLOL –  Paul D. Waite May 10 '10 at 13:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.