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There was a question regarding checking for a handled exception in Junits. I seem to have done this in my code. Other people tend to say it is not possible since the exception is not thrown by the method. Can someone explain what is happening in the code below.

public class DatabaseConnector
{

private DBConnectionInfo dbObject;
private DBQueryStatements dbQueries;

void loadConnectionInfo()
{
    Properties databaseProperties = new Properties();
    try
    {
        databaseProperties.load(getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("database.properties"));
        dbObject.setDatabaseURL(databaseProperties.getProperty("jdbc.url"));
        dbObject.setUserName(databaseProperties.getProperty("jdbc.username"));
        dbObject.setPassword(databaseProperties.getProperty("jdbc.password"));
        dbObject.setDriver(databaseProperties.getProperty("jdbc.driver"));
    } catch (IOException e)
    {

        Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(PostgreLocationManager.class.getName());
        lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, e.getMessage(), e);
    }

}

public DBConnectionInfo connectionInit()
{

    loadConnectionInfo();

    try
    {
        Class.forName(dbObject.getDriver());
    } catch (Exception e)
    {
        Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(PostgreLocationManager.class.getName());
        lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, e.getMessage(), e);
    }

    try
    {
        dbObject.setConnection(DriverManager.getConnection(dbObject.getDatabaseURL(), dbObject.getUserName(),
                dbObject.getPassword()));
    } catch (Exception e)
    {
        Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(PostgreLocationManager.class.getName());
        lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, e.getMessage(), e);
    }
    return dbObject;
}
}

The test cases for the above code.

public class DatabaseConnectorTest
{

DatabaseConnector dbConnector;
DBConnectionInfo dbModelObject;
DBQueryStatements dbQueries;

    @Before
    public void setUp() throws Exception
    {
        MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this);
        dbModelObject = mock(DBConnectionInfo.class);
        dbQueries = mock(DBQueryStatements.class);    
        dbConnector = new DatabaseConnector(dbModelObject,dbQueries);
    }

@Test
public void testDriverFailure()
{
    when(dbModelObject.getDriver()).thenReturn("driver");
    when(dbModelObject.getDatabaseURL()).thenReturn("jdbc:postgresql://127.0.0.1:5432/testdb");
    when(dbModelObject.getUserName()).thenReturn("postgres");
    when(dbModelObject.getPassword()).thenReturn("postgres");

    try
    {
        dbConnector.connectionInit();
    } catch (Exception e)
    {
        assertTrue(e instanceof ClassNotFoundException);
    }

    verify(dbModelObject).getDriver();
}

@Test
public void testConnectionFailure()
{
    when(dbModelObject.getDriver()).thenReturn("org.postgresql.Driver");
    when(dbModelObject.getDatabaseURL()).thenReturn("jdbc:postgresql://127.0.0.1:5432/testdb");
    when(dbModelObject.getUserName()).thenReturn("uname");
    when(dbModelObject.getPassword()).thenReturn("uname");
    try
    {
        dbConnector.connectionInit();
    } catch (Exception e)
    {
        assertTrue(e instanceof SQLException);
    }

    verify(dbModelObject).getDriver();
    verify(dbModelObject).getDatabaseURL();
    verify(dbModelObject).getUserName();
    verify(dbModelObject).getPassword();
}
}
share|improve this question
1  
You can remove the line "MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this);", because you're not using annotations for initiating mocks. –  Stefan Birkner Oct 22 '13 at 19:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can simply use the @Test Annotation

@Test(expected=RuntimeException.class)

The other solution is, when you expect an exception, you should let fail your test

@Test
public void testConnectionFailure()
{
    ...
    try
    {
        dbConnector.connectionInit();
        fail("an exception should be thrown...")
    } catch (Exception e)
    {
        assertTrue(e instanceof SQLException);
    }
    ...
}  

Update #1:

I think your code and the testcase is not very well, because in your code you're catching all "good" exceptions! But they are telling you whats went wrong.

So let your code throw these exceptions.

But the other side is: Why you are writing a test case for standard java or java.sql features (ClassLoading, DriverManager)?

Update #2:

I will explain it by your example, because I am not an english native. ;)

Your Code:

try
{
        Class.forName(dbObject.getDriver());  
} catch (Exception e)
{
        Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(PostgreLocationManager.class.getName());
        lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, e.getMessage(), e);
}

Your Code in words:

try
{
        Do something from java standard. //Class.forName(dbObject.getDriver());  
} if an exception occures, go in this block //catch (Exception e) 
{
        Just print out the exception. 
        If someone knowns about your application he'll take a look in the log. 
        If not, your exception is lost, after leaving this block.
        And I think here is your problem!
        Do not catch any exceptions in a so low level of your application.
}

Your Testcase:

@Test
public void testDriverFailure()
{
    ....
    try
    {
        dbConnector.connectionInit();
    } catch (Exception e)
    {
        assertTrue(e instanceof ClassNotFoundException);
    }
}

Your Testcase in words:

@Test
public void testDriverFailure()
{
    ....
    try
    {
        try to init your dbConnector. 
    } Catch exceptions (
          They never thrown, because you already catched them in the method connectionInit().
          And here right now, you know, why its a bad idea 
          to catch exceptions and place them into logfiles (except in the very high level of your application)!
      )
    {
        Now Check, that the Java-VM ClassLoader (Not your code!!!) will throw an ClassNotFoundException. 
        Why you not trusting the jvm developers? ;)
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But did you read my question? –  AdityaTS Oct 21 '13 at 11:53
1  
I updated my answer. ;) –  Mirko Oct 22 '13 at 6:56
    
Can you elaborate more. I need not write test cases for java sql features? –  AdityaTS Oct 24 '13 at 4:59
1  
Updated again. ;) And I think, no, you should not write testcases for third party libraries. Except you don't trust them, or want to want to have the guarantee that the behaviour of third party libraries are the same after a release change. –  Mirko Oct 24 '13 at 6:03

You catch the exception in your code and write something to the log. Therefore the test cannot see the exception and you cannot test that it is thrown. But you can test that you logged something. Another way would be to test that your code doesn't throw an exception and returns null.

share|improve this answer
    
The above test case runs successfully. I am not throwing the exception from the tested method. But it seems to be available in the test case which is what I don't understand. –  AdityaTS Oct 21 '13 at 11:58
    
Sorry, my fault. What do you mean with "it seems to be available in the test case"? –  Stefan Birkner Oct 21 '13 at 13:02
    
The exception is available in the test case. I am handling it in the test case. Check the catch block where I test for the Exception type. –  AdityaTS Oct 22 '13 at 6:40
1  
I think that your catch block gets not executed, because no exception is thrown. You can always add try { } catch (Exception e) { } to your code. This means nothing. –  Stefan Birkner Oct 22 '13 at 19:48
    
What is "the exception", that you're handling? –  Stefan Birkner Oct 22 '13 at 19:53

The method connectionInit () , as it is currently written, does not throw any exceptions. In both of your test cases, you are supposedly checking for expected failures (from what I could understand with your code), but you do not call the fail () JUnit method if no failure occur, so you have the impression that your test cases both pass while they should both fail. As Mirko mentioned, you should change your code to call fail () after the call to connectionInit ().

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