Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a batch file I'm trying to check if a service is started, if not then wait.

Now to check if a service is running, I am doing this:

sc query "serviceName" | find /i "RUNNING"
if "%ERRORLEVEL%"=="0" (
    echo serviceName is running.
) else (
    echo serviceName is not running
)

Trouble is the errorlevel is always set to 0. Possibly because of this known Find bug. Is there any alternate way to check if a service is started, if not then wait?

share|improve this question
2  
Avoid to "reset" the %errorlevel% variable in your code. If you set it to any value, commands will set correctly the errorlevel value BUT NOT the %errorlevel% variable. –  MC ND Oct 21 '13 at 11:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your code will work fine, if you aren't using Windows NT version 3.1 and Windows NT Advanced Server version 3.1 and your service name doesn't include running.

Perhaps it is within a loop and so you should use this (or delayed expansion):

sc query "serviceName" | find /i "RUNNING"
if not ERRORLEVEL 1 (
    echo serviceName is running.
) else (
    echo serviceName is not running
)
share|improve this answer
    
aah.Brackets block.Didn't come to me.+1 –  npocmaka Oct 21 '13 at 11:35

You could use Findstr instead of Find command:

sc query "Service name" | findstr /i "RUNNING" 1>nul 2>&1 && (
    echo serviceName is running.
) || (
    echo serviceName is not running
)

You can do it also using wmic command:

wmic service where name="Service name" get State | Findstr /I "Running" 1>NUL 2>&1 && (
    echo serviceName is running.
) || (
    echo serviceName is not running
)

Another thing to notice for the future is that when comparing numeric values you should not enclose expressions with quotes "", so the condition should look like this:

If %ERRORLEVEL% EQU 0 () ELSE ()
share|improve this answer

Works for me.Is it possible your ERRORLEVEL variable to be overwriten or your code to be in brackets block? try one of these:

sc query "serviceName" | findstr /i "RUNNING"
if not errorlevel 1 (
    echo serviceName is running.
) else (
    echo serviceName is not running
)

or

sc query "serviceName" | findstr /i "RUNNING" && (
    echo serviceName is running.
    goto :skip_not_w
) 
echo serviceName is not running
:skip_not_w

The cited bug is for windows nt (is this your OS?) and should be fixed already...If your os is NT , you should parse the output of the command with FOR /F to see it contains RUNNING or use FINDSTR

share|improve this answer
for /F "tokens=3 delims=: " %%H in ('sc query "serviceName" ^| findstr "        STATE"') do (
  if /I "%%H" NEQ "RUNNING" (
   echo Service not started
   net start "serviceName"
  )
)
share|improve this answer

Another way with a function:

:IsServiceRunning servicename
sc query "%~1"|findstr "STATE.*:.*4.*RUNNING">NUL

Usage Example:

Call :IsServiceRunning service && Service is running || Service isn't running
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.