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I'm writting an expect script to automate some tests. To detect when a general error occurs (which can happen at any phase of the test), instead of repeating the same pattern (for instance, "Rebooting system") on each expect command, I decided to use expect_background for that kind of condition.

What I understand about the expect_background command is that it is checked against all input text before the currently active expect. So, if both expect_background and expect are waiting for the same pattern, I expect (with the pun, please ;-) ) both actions to be triggered. For instance:

#!/usr/bin/expect -f

spawn ./counter.sh

expect_background {
  "5" { puts "expect-bg"; }
}

expect {
  "9" { puts "expect-9"; }
}

expect {
  "20" { puts "expect-20"; }
}

The ./counter.sh script counts from 1 to 20 with intervals of 1 second. According to the behavior I described above, "expect-bg" should be printed at 5 and 15, expect-9 at 9, and "expect-20" at 20. But here is what I get:

$ ./expect_bg.expect  
spawn ./counter.sh
1
2
3
4
5
expect-bg
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
expect-bg
16
17
18
19
20

Why is that happening? And how to I get the behavior described?

share|improve this question
    
According to the manual, doing an expect when an expect_background is unblocked does not work. (expect_background {pattern {if 0 {expect_background is blocked, you can use [expect] here}};if 0 {expect_background is unblocked, don't use [expect]}) – Johannes Kuhn Oct 21 '13 at 13:53
    
What does it mean an expect_background to be blocked/unblocked? – freitass Oct 21 '13 at 15:04
    
I suspect you want expect_before instead – glenn jackman Oct 21 '13 at 15:30
    
@glennjackman: Not quite. If I'm in a sleep, for instance, and the pattern appears, it won't be matched with expect_before. I need something "full time". – freitass Oct 21 '13 at 15:48
    
either use expect or expect_background, not both. A blocked expect_background is afaik if a pattern matched and the corresponding script is executed. – Johannes Kuhn Oct 21 '13 at 16:36

I can produce your desired output with expect_before and exp_continue

#!/usr/bin/expect -f
spawn sh counter.sh
expect_before {
    5 {puts "expect_before"; exp_continue}
}
expect {
    9 {puts "exp_9"}
}
expect {
    20 {puts "exp_20"}
}
$ expect counter.exp 
spawn sh counter.sh
1
2
3
4
5
expect_before
6
7
8
9
exp_9
10
11
12
13
14
15
expect_before
16
17
18
19
20
exp_20

When you have

expect_before {
    5 {puts "expect_before"; exp_continue}
}
expect {
    9 {puts "exp_9"}
}

you effectively have this:

expect {
    5 {puts "expect_before"; exp_continue}
    9 {puts "exp_9"}
}

If you omit the exp_continue, that expect statement ends with the first 5, so you never get a chance to look for 9.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I tried your suggestion and it works for the given example. Unfortunately, for the real case it doesn't. imagine that, instead of printing "exp_9" the action for that expect command is to sleep for 10 seconds. For that little example your solution works because the monitored text fits in the 2000 bytes default buffer size, but for a real life log intensive application it doesn't. – freitass Oct 21 '13 at 17:34
    
Well, the sleep situation could be worked around with an expect + timeout but that's ugly and not 100% effective. – freitass Oct 21 '13 at 17:36

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