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In database(SQL Server), say, one column values are like:

Col1
====
10
5
15
20
5
10
2

This is like list of integer data.

Rank should be:

Col1 Rank
==== ====
20    1
15    2
10    3
10    3
5     4
5     4
2     5

I have tried in following manner:

1) First sort the list of data in descending order of "Col1" value
2) Find the index of a particular record using FindIndex() method.
3) Then Rank = Index + 1

But it will only work if the data are unique. It fails when same "Col1" values are present in multiple rows as the index is returning 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

How to calculate the rank when the list contains data which are not distinct(in most cases!) using C# LINQ?

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what if taking distinct values first and then do the above scenario... –  Gopesh Sharma Oct 21 '13 at 11:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why not do it in the database?

SELECT [Col1], DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY Col1 DESC) AS [Rank]
FROM Table

But if you must do it in C#

var data = new List<int>();
var rankings = data.OrderByDescending(x => x)
                   .GroupBy(x => x)
                   .SelectMany((g, i) =>
                       g.Select(e => new { Col1 = e, Rank = i + 1 }))
                   .ToList();
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2  
This is wrong. dense_rank() should be used. The C# code is also wrong. –  GSerg Oct 21 '13 at 11:49
    
I believe the question says rank = index + 1 –  gleng Oct 21 '13 at 11:50
    
@GSerg I've never heard of that function, thanks! –  Romoku Oct 21 '13 at 11:50
    
+1 for correction! –  gleng Oct 21 '13 at 11:51
1  
Yes this is what I am doing. I have a class defined but still it takes much time... :( –  Maninder Oct 21 '13 at 13:14

If you would do it in the database (either by running a query or by selecting from a VIEW), the query/view should be thus:

SELECT [Col1], DENSE_RANK() OVER (ORDER BY Col1 DESC) AS [Rank]
FROM OriginalTable

This is much easier and faster than doing it in C# or any other language that must first retrieve the data and then post-process it.

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If the question is "How do I do this using C# LINQ?", then how is your answer appropriate? Also: how do you know your SQL solution is faster... have you run tests versus a C# solution? If so, please post your numbers. –  Andrew Coonce Oct 21 '13 at 14:18
1  
Any calculation that SQL Server can do for you will run faster than when you first fetch the data, then perform the calculation on that data. This is because SQL Server can optimize the way it fetches data and its calculation engine is optimized for speed. This is not just the case in an obvious example such as this, but also when it comes to having calculated columns in VIEWs. Yes, I have run tests, many years ago, and we even did very complex computations in SQL Server. –  Roy Dictus Oct 21 '13 at 21:01
    
And how is the answer appropriate? Because the OP may be unaware that doing a calculation in SQL Server is a viable option. –  Roy Dictus Oct 21 '13 at 21:01

In C#:

var data = new List<int> { 10, 12, 7, 8, 7, 6, 3, 3, 4 };
var rankings = data.OrderByDescending(x => x).GroupBy(x => x)
                   .SelectMany((g, i) =>
                       g.Select(e => new { Col1 = e, Rank = i + 1 }))
                   .ToList();
share|improve this answer

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