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I have the following code:

HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url);
request.Method = "HEAD";
request.Credentials = MyCredentialCache;

try
{
    request.GetResponse();
}
catch
{
}

How can I catch a specific 404 error? The WebExceptionStatus.ProtocolError can only detect that an error occurred, but not give the exact code of the error.

For example:

catch (WebException ex)
{
    if (ex.Status != WebExceptionStatus.ProtocolError)
    {
        throw ex;
    }
}

Is just not useful enough... the protocol exception could be 401, 503, 403, anything really.

share|improve this question
9  
NNNOOOOOOOOOOOOO! Don't catch System.Exception, and don't depend on the exception text in your handler! –  Aaronaught Jan 28 '10 at 16:09
2  
So what would you recommend? –  Luke101 Jan 28 '10 at 16:11
2  
John Saunders' answer was the most complete. I think people just downvoted him out of spite. –  Aaronaught Jan 28 '10 at 16:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Use the HttpStatusCode Enumeration, specifically HttpStatusCode.NotFound

Something like:

HttpWebResponse errorResponse = we.Response as HttpWebResponse;
if (errorResponse.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.NotFound) {
  //
}

Where
we is a WebException.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's ideal... worked like a charm, thanks again! –  JL. Dec 22 '09 at 22:35
    
can I get the NUMBER out somehow from the objects without making my own lookup list? I would like to have something like: int httpresponsecode = HttpStatusCode.ToInt() or similar so I get 404 –  BerggreenDK Apr 12 '11 at 14:42
2  
@BerggreenDK you should be able to just do int httpresonsecode = (int) HttpStatusCode.NotFound –  Trev Mar 14 '12 at 14:30
2  
-1 Partial explanation of my ancient downvote: code throws NullReferenceException if, for some reason, we.Response is not HttpWebResponse. If the code wishes to assume that it will always have that type, then it should simply cast: HttpWebResponse errorResponse = (HttpWebResponse)we.Response;. This will throw an explicit InvalidCastException if the impossible happens, instead of a mysterious NullReferenceException. –  John Saunders Apr 21 at 18:17
try
{
    var request = WebRequest.Create(uri);
    using (var response = request.GetResponse())
    {
        using (var responseStream = response.GetResponseStream())
        {
            // Process the stream
        }
    }
}
catch (WebException ex)
{
    if (ex.Status == WebExceptionStatus.ProtocolError &&
        ex.Response != null)
    {
        var resp = (HttpWebResponse) ex.Response;
        if (resp.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.NotFound)
        {
            // Do something
        }
        else
        {
            // Do something else
        }
    }
    else
    {
        // Do something else
    }
}
share|improve this answer
7  
lol @ being the IDisposable police and giving everyone a -1 for not wrapping the response in a using block. –  Rich Jan 27 '10 at 18:32
2  
It's a tough job, but someone has to do it. OTOH, I almost didn't add this answer, since it might seem I was dinging everyone else to make mine the top-rated answer. –  John Saunders Jan 27 '10 at 18:38
2  
I actually upvoted, but I just noticed one thing: There should probably be a throw (rethrow) at the end of your catch, otherwise this will just silently eat any other type of WebException. –  Aaronaught Jan 28 '10 at 16:17
    
@John Saunders: Why don't you have a using around your request as well? –  Joel Etherton Jan 28 '10 at 16:18
    
@Joel: WebRequest doesn't implement IDisposable. –  John Saunders Jan 28 '10 at 17:33

I haven't tested this, but it should work

try
{
    // TODO: Make request.
}
catch (WebException ex)
{
    if (ex.Status == WebExceptionStatus.ProtocolError) {
        HttpWebResponse resp = ex.Response as HttpWebResponse;
        if (resp != null && resp.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.NotFound)
        {
            // TODO: Handle 404 error.
        }
        else
            throw;
    }
    else
        throw;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@John Saunders - I was adapting the OP's code, not optimizing it. –  MiffTheFox Jan 27 '10 at 19:24
    
@John - And maybe I was only expecting them to copy/paste the catch block, seeing as I had the exact same code in the try as the OP. You should really be downvoaing this question altogether because of the OP's code then. –  MiffTheFox Jan 28 '10 at 15:58
1  
@John we forget here is sample code. This is case it is another way to 404, not how to use GetResponse. -1 seems a little harsh. +1 to Miff for answering the question. –  David Basarab Jan 28 '10 at 17:38
    
@John I think it is good you point it out in a comment. The way I look at down voting is if the code given doesn't solve the problem. Thank you for removing the down vote. –  David Basarab Jan 28 '10 at 18:45
    
@John - Fine, I got rid of everything but the catch, happy now? –  MiffTheFox Jan 28 '10 at 21:41

I think if you catch a WebException there is some information in there that you can use to determine if it was a 404. That's the only way I know of at the moment...I'd be interested in knowing any others...

catch(WebException e) {
    if(e.Status == WebExceptionStatus.ProtocolError) {
        var statusCode = (HttpWebResponse)e.Response).StatusCode);
        var description = (HttpWebResponse)e.Response).StatusDescription);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Check out this snipit. The GetResponse will throw a WebRequestException. Catch that and you can get the status code from the response.

try {
   // Create a web request for an invalid site. Substitute the "invalid site" strong in the Create call with a invalid name.
     HttpWebRequest myHttpWebRequest = (HttpWebRequest) WebRequest.Create("invalid site");

    // Get the associated response for the above request.
     HttpWebResponse myHttpWebResponse = (HttpWebResponse) myHttpWebRequest.GetResponse();
    myHttpWebResponse.Close();
}
catch(WebException e) {
    Console.WriteLine("This program is expected to throw WebException on successful run."+
                        "\n\nException Message :" + e.Message);
    if(e.Status == WebExceptionStatus.ProtocolError) {
        Console.WriteLine("Status Code : {0}", ((HttpWebResponse)e.Response).StatusCode);
        Console.WriteLine("Status Description : {0}", ((HttpWebResponse)e.Response).StatusDescription);
    }
}
catch(Exception e) {
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
}

this came from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.webexception.status.aspx

share|improve this answer

StatusCode property is what I think, you are looking for.

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See at MSDN about status of the response:

...
catch(WebException e) {
  Console.WriteLine("The following error occured : {0}",e.Status);  
}
...
share|improve this answer
2  
@John Saunders - I'll be more than happy to pass it along to MSDN (where I copied the sample from...). The purpose of this code is to show the usage of StatusCode, not be as efficient as possible. –  Dror Jan 28 '10 at 9:04
1  
@John Saunders - I left only the part I wanted to show, Just for you :-) –  Dror Jan 28 '10 at 16:09

Catch the proper exception type WebException:

try
{
    var request = (HttpWebRequest) WebRequest.Create(String.Format("http://www.gravatar.com/avatar/{0}?d=404", hashe));

    using(var response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse())
        Response.Write("has avatar");
}
catch(WebException e) 
{
  if(e.Response.StatusCode == 404) 
    Response.Write("No avatar");
}
share|improve this answer
    
@John Saunders I don't debate you there, but that wasn't the question, he asked the best way to capture a 404. My changes to his code were limited to answering the question, to make the change as simple and obvious as possible. –  Nick Craver Jan 27 '10 at 18:46
    
@John Saunders: Fixed, I suppose "if this is the most efficient" makes it apply to the question. –  Nick Craver Jan 27 '10 at 18:59

For VB.NET folks browsing this, I believe we can catch the exception only if it truly is a 404. Something like:

Try
    httpWebrequest.GetResponse()
Catch we As WebException When we.Response IsNot Nothing _
                              AndAlso TypeOf we.Response Is HttpWebResponse _
                              AndAlso (DirectCast(we.Response, HttpWebResponse).StatusCode = HttpStatusCode.NotFound)

    ' ...

End Try
share|improve this answer
    
You believe you can? Please try it and then say "yes" or "no". –  John Saunders Jul 9 at 19:31

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