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If the JavaScript new operator was a function, how would it be defined?

function _new(fn) {
    // What goes here?
}
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closed as unclear what you're asking by putvande, Raymond Chen, zzzzBov, George Jempty, Mathletics Oct 21 '13 at 14:46

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
@raam86 no, it's an operator! And this is actually a really good question... –  Alnitak Oct 21 '13 at 13:54
4  
This question is off-topic because it is not practical. The new operator Is part of the language. Use it. There is no reason to reimplement it. –  Raymond Chen Oct 21 '13 at 13:59
1  
@RaymondChen I disagree - an answer to this question would probably also indirectly answer the question I've had in my own mind about how you would invoke new with an array of parameters. –  Alnitak Oct 21 '13 at 14:01
2  
Alas, this question is a dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/10428603/… –  jrdmcgr Oct 21 '13 at 14:16
1  
Quantas 94 Heavy, Johathan Lonowski, and Alnitak had no trouble discerning the meaning of my question and all provided great answers. The question is simple, and concise, but more importantly it has already been asked on SO. If you don't like the question, then mark it as a dupe instead of putting it on hold. –  jrdmcgr Oct 21 '13 at 15:16

4 Answers 4

There are a few limitations owing to the capabilities of user code: native constructors such as new Date and new RegExp and bound function cannot be shimmed properly using this function.

If you're looking for the relevant specification sections, they are §11.2.2 and §13.2.2.

Anyway, here goes:

// we're assuming that correct arguments are given
function _new(F, args) {
  // we could have host objects, make sure edge case not left out
  // (typeof could be other than object or function in this case - see bottom)
  function Type(arg) {
    if (arg === undefined) return 'Undefined';
    if (arg === null) return 'Null';
    if (arg === false || arg === true) return 'Boolean';

    var type = typeof arg;
    if (type === 'string') return 'String';
    if (type === 'number') return 'Number';
    return 'Object';
  }

  // 1. Let obj be a newly created native ECMAScript object.
  // 2. Set all the internal methods of obj as specified in 8.12.
  // 3. Set the [[Class]] internal property of obj to "Object".
  // 4. Set the [[Extensible]] internal property of obj to true.
  // All of the steps above are implicitly completed in steps 6 or 7
  var obj;

  // 5. Let proto be the value of calling the [[Get]] internal property of F
  //    with argument "prototype".
  var proto = F.prototype;

  // 6. If Type(proto) is Object, set the [[Prototype]] internal property of
  //    obj to proto.
  if (Type(proto) === 'Object') obj = Object.create(proto);

  // 7. If Type(proto) is not Object, set the [[Prototype]] internal property
  //    of obj to the standard built-in Object prototype object as described
  //    in 15.2.4.
  else obj = {};

  // 8. Let result be the result of calling the [[Call]] internal property of
  //    F, providing obj as the this value and providing the argument list
  //    passed into [[Construct]] as args.
  var result = F.apply(obj, args);

  // 9. If Type(result) is Object then return result.
  if (Type(result) === 'Object') return result;

  // 10. Return obj.
  return obj;
}

About the typeof cases, that is for the edge case when host objects return a typeof value which is not object or function. By testing for anything they can't be, this allows us to test for it properly instead of relying on them being native objects.

Note that this is for at least ES5 -- the only way to shim Object.create in ES3 or older environments would be to use the exact thing that we're currently trying to emulate, which defeats the point of doing so.

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This appears to be the minimum necessary, albeit not 100% conformant with the language definition and without error checking. It's ES5 only. There is a shim for Object.create, but by necessity it must call new making it rather pointless in this context!

function _new(T, args) {
    var o = Object.create(T.prototype);
    var res = o.constructor.apply(o, args);
    return (typeof res === 'object') ? res : o;
}

with usage:

function A(name) {
    this.name = name;
}

A.prototype.hello = function() {
    console.log(this);
}


var foo = _new(A, ['foo']);
var bar = _new(A, ['bar']);

console.log(foo.name);
console.log(bar.name);

The test of the return value of the call to the constructor is necessary because a constructor does not have to return this - if the constructor returns nothing the this is implicit.

See http://jsfiddle.net/uQpUv/

share|improve this answer
    
If prototype is undefined, then it won't work as per the specification. –  Qantas 94 Heavy Oct 21 '13 at 14:11
    
@Qantas94Heavy yeah, that's what I meant about "minimum necessary". It's pretty hard to create a function that doesn't have a prototype, though - you have to call Object.create(null), AFAICR. –  Alnitak Oct 21 '13 at 14:12
    
res ? res : o doesn't conform to standards, but the concept is close. –  zzzzBov Oct 21 '13 at 14:12
    
@zzzzBov better? –  Alnitak Oct 21 '13 at 14:13
    
@Alnitak, no actually, there's a lot more nuance, for example, in function A() { return 1 }; var b = new A();, b will be an object, not the value 1. –  zzzzBov Oct 21 '13 at 14:15

Had this same curiosity recently.

There is an issue with some of the steps being internal tasks, which simply can't be reimplemented within language.

And, over my original take, Qantas has a good point about using typeof as a faux Type() -- that it should be exclusive to support custom host object types.

But, with that, this is as close as I could manage. Though, it requires that Object.create() be available (so, ES5+).

Object.new = function (constructor /*, args */) {
  function isObject(operand) {
    // detect and refuse primitives
    var type = typeof operand;
    return type !== 'undefined' &&
           type !== 'boolean' &&
           type !== 'number' &&
           type !== 'string' &&
           operand !== null;
  }

  var argList = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);

  if (typeof constructor !== 'function') {
    throw new TypeError((typeof constructor) + ' is not a function');
  }

  var proto = constructor.prototype;
  var obj = Object.create(isObject(proto) ? proto : Object.prototype);

  var result = constructor.apply(obj, argList);
  return isObject(result) ? result : obj;
};

Example:

function Foo(one, two) {
    this.one = one;
    this.two = two;
}

var bar = Object.new(Foo, 'a', 'b');

console.log(bar instanceof Foo); // true
console.log(bar.one);            // "a"
console.log(bar.two);            // "b"

And, the annotated version, with steps from 11.2.2 new Operator and 13.2.2 [[Construct]]:

//    1. Let ref be the result of evaluating MemberExpression.
//    2. Let constructor be GetValue(ref).
Object.new = function (constructor /*, args */) {
  function isObject(operand) {
    // detect and refuse primitives
    var type = typeof operand;
    return type !== 'undefined' &&
           type !== 'boolean' &&
           type !== 'number' &&
           type !== 'string' &&
           operand !== null;
  }

  //  3. Let argList be the result of evaluating Arguments, producing an internal list of argument values (11.2.4).
  var argList = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);

  //  4. If Type(constructor) is not Object, throw a TypeError exception.
  //  5. If constructor does not implement the [[Construct]] internal method, throw a TypeError exception.
  if (typeof constructor !== 'function') {
    throw new TypeError((typeof constructor) + ' is not a function');
  }

  //  6. Return the result of calling the [[Construct]] internal method on constructor, providing the list argList as the argument values.

  //    For [[Construct]], it gets a bit out of order with current options for internal vs. abstractions.

  //    5. Let proto be the value of calling the [[Get]] internal property of F with argument "prototype".
  var proto = constructor.prototype;

  //    1. Let obj be a newly created native ECMAScript object.
  //    2. Set all the internal methods of obj as specified in 8.12.
  //    3. Set the [[Class]] internal property of obj to "Object".
  //    4. Set the [[Extensible]] internal property of obj to true.
  //
  //    6. If Type(proto) is Object, set the [[Prototype]] internal property of obj to proto.
  //    7. If Type(proto) is not Object, set the [[Prototype]] internal property of obj to the standard built-in Object prototype object as described in 15.2.4.
  var obj = Object.create(isObject(proto) ? proto : Object.prototype);

  //    8. Let result be the result of calling the [[Call]] internal property of F, providing obj as the this value and providing the argument list passed into [[Construct]] as args.
  var result = constructor.apply(obj, argList);

  //    9. If Type(result) is Object then return result.
  //   10. Return obj.
  return isObject(result) ? result : obj;
};
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1  
+1 for linking to documentation for the behavior. –  zzzzBov Oct 21 '13 at 14:16

Haters gonna hate, but something like this?

Obviously this is just a round about alias of new but with scope to extend it's potential with the arguments.

http://jsfiddle.net/2qhE2/3/

function _new(classname, arguments) {
    // other logic
    return new classname(arguments || {});  
}

function car(args){
    alert(args.make);   
}

var MyNewCar = _new(car, {make: "vw"});
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5  
Not a hater, not hating, but this is just a wrapper –  George Jempty Oct 21 '13 at 14:07
1  
I knew that was coming (edit time == comment time). Obviously a more thoroughly detailed answer is needed. –  Ian Brindley Oct 21 '13 at 14:09
1  
I'm not one of the down-modders though, so I don't hate ;) –  George Jempty Oct 21 '13 at 14:12

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