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I was just wondering because it came up in our project today. There doesn't seem to be a difference when implementing a mixin and capturing the parameters with @arguments or ellipsis, couldn't find anything useful on google either so I'm asking here.

Example:

.transition(@arguments) {
    -webkit-transition: @arguments;
    -moz-transition: @arguments;
    transition: @arguments;
}

or

.transition(...) {
    -webkit-transition: @arguments;
    -moz-transition: @arguments;
    transition: @arguments;
}

Use:

.transition(left 0.3s ease, top 0.3s ease);

Is there any advantage to either of these implementations?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There doesn't seem to be a difference

There's actually, did you try to compile your code? These are quite different mixins:

// this is a mixin definition with a variable number of arguments
.a(...) {
    // here you use built-in @arguments variable
    a-value: @arguments;
}

// this is a mixin definition with a single argument
.b(@arguments) {
    // here you use a variable you've just declared in mixin's argument list
    // (and it's not the built-in @arguments!)
    b-value: @arguments;
}

test {
    .a(1, 2, 3); // OK
    .b(1, 2, 3); // Error
}

Or in other words:

.a(@arguments) {
    a-value: @arguments;
}

is equal to:

.a(@x) {
    @arguments: @x; // defines a new variable that overrides the built-in one
    a-value: @arguments;
}

There's also another way to declare a variable argument list: .mixin(@whatever...). Basically it is the same as (...) but it is useful when you need something like:

.c(@head, @tail...) {
    head: @head;
    tail: @tail;
}

test {
    .c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
}
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The only difference between those two is that transition(...) accepts any number of arguments, while transition(@arguments) accepts only one argument.

@arguments (in mixin body) contains all passed arguments and does not depend on what are original mixins parameters, as long as one of them isn't called arguments, too.

In your case the first mixin won't compile, because you specify one parameter, but pass two. In order to pass comma-separated list into mixin as one argument, use semicolon (;) as separator:

.transition(left 0.3s ease, top 0.3s ease;);

If you pass only one argument, your both mixins do basically same thing.

You can read more in the docs - scroll down a bit to reach "The @arguments variable".

share|improve this answer
    
That's the thing I oversaw, there actually was a semicolon at the end in our mixin call. This way it works with both @arguments and ellipsis... –  Simon Oct 22 '13 at 9:09
    
Still have to mark the other answer as solution, because technically there is a difference. –  Simon Oct 22 '13 at 9:18
    
Sure. I must've failed to express my thought in right words - I wanted to say that as long as one argument is passed, there is no difference. I've edited my answer to make it clearer. –  Michał Rybak Oct 22 '13 at 17:48

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