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Every SQL Server connection string I ever see looks something like this:

Data Source=MyLocalSqlServerInstance;Initial Catalog=My Nifty Database;
    Integrated Security=SSPI;

Do I need the Initial Catalog setting? (Apparently not, since the app I'm working on appears to work without it.)

Well, then, what's it for?

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11  
Hmmm, I just discovered that my app put all my created tables in master. Oops. I may have just learned the answer to my question. –  Kyralessa Dec 22 '09 at 23:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If the user that is the connection string has access to more then one database you have to specify the database you want the connection string to connect to. If your user has only one database available then you are correct that it doesn't matter. But it is good practice to put this in your connection string.

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Not quite true. The login may not have permissions on the default database. So, you need to change the database context on connection –  gbn Dec 23 '09 at 7:30

This is the initial database of the data source when you connect.

Edited for clarity:

If you have multiple databases in your SQL Server instance and you don't want to use the default database, you need some way to specify which one you are going to use.

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The first part is correct. The second part is not correct. When you create the account it is assigned a default database which will be used if initial catalog is not specified. This generally defaults to master (for some unknown reason). –  GrayWizardx Dec 22 '09 at 23:09
    
When I say "by default" I simply mean when you are not qualifying the database in your object names. In any case, I have clarified my answer. –  Andy West Dec 22 '09 at 23:19

Setting an Initial Catalog allows you to set the default database that queries run on that connection will use by default. If you do not set this for a connection to a server in which multiple databases are present, in many cases you will be required to have a USE statement in every query in order to explicitly declare which database you are trying to run the query on. The Initial Catalog setting is a good way of explicitly declaring a default database.

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If you have multiple databases in your SQL Server instance and you don't want to use the default database, you need some way to specify which one you are going to use. If the user that is the connection string has access to more then one database you have to specify the database you want the connection string to connect to. If your user has only one database available then you are correct that it doesn't matter. But it is good practice to put this in your connection string.

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