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I have the following two Java classes (SensorData, and Visibility) to store dummy sensor data, and their respective visibilities into two objects:

SensorData.java

package com.data.world2; 

import java.util.Map; 
import java.util.TreeMap; 

import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonAnyGetter; 
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonAnySetter; 
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonProperty; 

public class SensorData { 

    private final Map<String, Object> keyvalues = new TreeMap<String, Object>(); 

    @JsonProperty 
    private Visibility visibility; 

    // getters and setters 
    @JsonAnyGetter 
    public Map<String, Object> getKeyvalues() { 
      return keyvalues; 
    } 

    @JsonAnySetter 
    public void setKeyvalues(final String key, final Object value) { 
      this.keyvalues.put(key, value); 
    } 

    // getters and setters 
    public Visibility getVisibility() { 
       return visibility; 
    } 

    public void setVisibility(Visibility visibility) { 
       this.visibility = visibility; 
    } 

} 

Visibility.java

package com.data.world2; 

import java.util.Map; 
import java.util.TreeMap; 

import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonAnyGetter; 
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonAnySetter; 

public class Visibility { 

    private final Map<String, Object> keyvalues = new TreeMap<String, Object>(); 

    // getters and setters 

    @JsonAnyGetter 
    public Map<String, Object> getKeyvalues() { 
       return keyvalues; 
    } 

    @JsonAnySetter 
    public void setKeyvalues(final String key, final Object value) { 
       this.keyvalues.put(key, value); 
    } 

} 

And in my SensorGenerator class I store SensorData and Visibility keyvalue objects. For example, suppose I have two keyvalue pairs from a sensor (make and model), and only the "make" keyvalue pair has a visibility specified; the "model" keyvalue pair uses the default visibility:

    // create a sensorData object, and a visibility object 
    SensorData sensorData = new SensorData(); 
    Visibility visibility = new Visibility(); 

    sensorData.setKeyValues("s1make", "Apple"); // set sensor 1 make 
    visibility.setKeyValues("s1make", "public"); // set sensor 1 make visibility 
    sensorData.setKeyValues("s1model", "iPhone5"); // set sensor 1 model 
    // sensor 1 model visibility not specified 

    // set default visibility 
    visibility.setKeyValues("_default", "private"); // set default visibility for sensor keyvalue pairs 

Then I added the Visibility object to the SensorData object to get nested visibilities:

    // add the visibility to the SensorData object 
    sensorData.setVisibility(visibility); 

UPDATED:

The issue was that I was not returning the list back to Camel correctly for marshalling to JSON.

When I changed my code to the following I had the full nested JSON marshalled:

 List<SensorData> sensorDataList = new ArrayList<SensorData>();
 sensorDataList.add(sensorData);

The following is the previous way I had which was incorrect (just here for historical info)

And then I return a List of SensorData objects to my Camel thread for marshalling to JSON with the Jackson library (camel-jackson):

    // Build a sensorDataList based on the keyvalues stored in the SensorData object 
    List<SensorData> sensorDataList = new ArrayList(sensorData.getKeyvalues().entrySet()); 

When I run my Java program I'd expect to see the following nested JSON from my Camel route:

[{"key":"s1make","value":Apple"}, 
 {"key":"s1model","value":"iPhone5"}, 
 {"visibility": {"key":"s1make","value":"public", 
                 "key":"_default","value":"private"} 
}] 

But instead, I only see are the SensorData keyvalues marshalled into JSON i.e.,:

[{"key":"s1make","value":Apple"}, 
 {"key":"s1model","value":"iPhone5"}] 

How come I don't see the "s1make" and "_default" visibilities as nested JSON? Does camel-jackson 2.12.1 not support marshalling of nested objects into nested JSON?

Btw, here is a snippet of my applicationContext.xml where I specify the marshalling to JSON:

      <camel:dataFormats>
         <camel:json id="jack" library="Jackson"/>
      </camel:dataFormats>

      <camel:route>

             <camel:from 
                     uri="timer://hello.world.request.timer?fixedRate=true&amp;period={{config.timeout}}" />
             <camel:to uri="log:hello.world.request?level=INFO&amp;showAll=true" />
             <camel:bean ref="helloWorld" />


             <camel:marshal ref ="jack"/>
             <camel:convertBodyTo type="java.lang.String" />
             <camel:log message="${body}"/>  


             <camel:log message="printing values read from config.properties file"/>
             <camel:log message="config.timeout= {{config.timeout}}"/>  
             <camel:log message="config.numSamples= {{config.numSamples}}"/>
             <camel:log message="config.defaultViz= {{config.defaultViz}}"/>


             <camel:to uri="log:hello.world.response?level=INFO&amp;showAll=true" />

       </camel:route>

 </camel:camelContext>

Last week I posted a similar question on SO, but realized after I posted it that I had to change my implementation to return a list to Camel instead of a map. How do I marshall nested key,value pairs into JSON with Camel and Jackson library?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am not sure why you need to use @JsonAnySetter/@JsonAnyGetter, but if you must, try this in both classes

@JsonAnySetter 
public void add(String key, String value) {
      keyValues.put(key, value);
}

Meanwhile, your setKeyValues should take a Map parameter. As you have it now, you have stretched JavaBean conventions.

Also, take Camel out of the equation. Write unit tests to test your configuration and make sure your objects are serialized/deserialized as you expect before integrating them into Camel and waiting until runtime for things to blow up.

share|improve this answer
    
But, my keyvalues in both Java classes are a Map. And things aren't blowing up with Camel, I'm just not getting all the data out into JSON. –  erj2code Oct 21 '13 at 15:31
    
I don't understand your first point. And by blowing up, I mean not working. I guess I am an alarmist haha. My point is that this has nothing to do with Camel; test outside the container. That's just good practice in general, and in this case it reduces your build/test/deploy cycle. –  Vidya Oct 21 '13 at 15:35
    
Well I'm confused how I'm violating JavaBean conventions when I am writing values to a map. I in fact did test this code outside of Camel first. I'm a big fan of incremental builds, and have actually done small increments up to this point. This helloworld project is just a small test bed for us to test with Camel. It is such a simple thing to write to a map, and then read it back as a list. It seems that marshalling this to JSON with camel-jackson that should just work. –  erj2code Oct 21 '13 at 15:41
1  
I didn't mean to challenge your process. So you're telling me if you just use plain Jackson in a unit test or a main method, then everything works as expected? If that's so, then you want to make sure camel-jackson has a dependency on the Jackson version you tested with...and that they can work together. –  Vidya Oct 21 '13 at 15:51
1  
absolutely Vidya :-) –  erj2code Oct 21 '13 at 17:57

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