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Is there any way to add an increment value while imploding an array?

This is the piece of code I'd like to have the increment value:

$entries = '<ul class="repeatData"><li class="listEntry1">' . implode('</li><li class="listEntry'. $countme .'">', $data) . '</li></ul>';

I'd like somehow to make the variable $countme increment every time it implodes each array value, if this is even possible.

share|improve this question
    
$countme = $countme + 1 ; – underscore Oct 21 '13 at 16:37
    
@samitha Doesn't work. I tried it. – otinanai Oct 21 '13 at 16:39
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You cannot do this with implode, but look into applying an anonymous function to the array. You can probably do what you want with not much more code.

$entries = '<ul class="repeatData">';
$countme = 1;

array_walk($data, function ($element) use (&$entries, &$countme) { 
    $entries .= '<li class="listEntry'. $countme .'">'. $element . '</li>';
    $countme++;
});
$entries .= "</ul>";

Explanation: I have written an anonymous function, told it about $entries and $counter (so it is a closure, in fact) so that it can modify them from inside its scope, and passed it to array_walk, which will apply it to all elements of the array.

share|improve this answer
1  
And yes a for loop is a faster answer, but closures are more fun, and a good technique for less tractable problems than html lists. I'm future-proofing the OP! – Tom Macdonald Oct 21 '13 at 16:57
1  
He wants to join the elements of the array into an html list. That is what I have done. I do not understand what the issue is. I know what implode() does. – Tom Macdonald Oct 21 '13 at 17:13
1  
sorry you are right, the code is ok and will do the job. I looked too much at the return value of array_map and not at the &entries param of the closure. – hek2mgl Oct 21 '13 at 17:14
1  
I see! array_walk would have been more correct than array_map. – Tom Macdonald Oct 21 '13 at 17:17
1  
Just perfect! It does exactly what I was after. – otinanai Oct 21 '13 at 18:19

There is no built in function for that. You have to write your own:


This function generalizes the problem and takes an array of glues and the data as arguments. You may refine it to fit more to your needs...

function custom_implode($glues, $pieces) {
    $result = '';
    while($piece = array_shift($pieces)) {
        $result .= $piece;
        $glue = array_shift($glues);
        if(!empty($pieces)) {
            $result .= $glue;
        }
    }

    return $result;
}

Usage:

$glues = array();
for($i = 0; $i < $end; $i++) {
    $glues []= '</li><li class="listEntry'. $i .'">';
}

echo custom_implode($glues, $data);

You can save the for loop which populates $glues if you customize the function a little bit more:

function custom_implode($start, $pieces) {
    $result = '';
    $counter = $start;
    while($piece = array_shift($pieces)) {
        $result .= $piece;
        if(!empty($pieces)) {
            $result .= '</li><li class="listEntry'. $counter .'">';
        }
    }
    return $result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I will try this function since it's the only complete suggestion to my question. – otinanai Oct 21 '13 at 16:48
    
Isn't the point of implode to skip the verbosity of writing out the loop yourself? While this is a literal solution to your problem, it involves writing out two loops (one in your function def and one to build up your glues) and adding an extra level of complexity. – grossvogel Oct 21 '13 at 16:56
    
@grossvogel I've mentioned that. This function is more general.. Can add a special function for the OP (in order to let him just copy paste the code without need to use his brain ;) – hek2mgl Oct 21 '13 at 16:57
    
Added that function – hek2mgl Oct 21 '13 at 17:02

To expand upon @ravloony's answer, you can use a mapping function with a counter to produce what you want, the following function could assist.

function implode_with_counter($glue, $array, $start, $pattern) {

    $count = $start;
    $str = "";

    array_walk($array, function($value) use ($glue, $pattern, &$str, &$count) {
        if (empty($str)) {
            $str = $value;
        } else {
            $str = $str . preg_replace('/' . preg_quote($pattern, '/') . '/', $count, $glue) . $value;
            $count++;
        }
    });

    return $str;
}

Example use:

echo implode_with_counter(' ([count]) ', range(1,5), 1, '[count]');

// Output: 1 (1) 2 (2) 3 (3) 4 (4) 5

For your case:

$entries = '<ul class="repeatData"><li class="listEntry1">'
    . implode_with_counter('</li><li class="listEntry[countme]">', $data, 2, '[countme]')
    . '</li></ul>';

Update: Alternative

An alternative approach is to just implement a callback version of implode(), and provide a function. Which is a little more universally usable, than the pattern matching.

function implode_callback($callback, array $array) {
    if (!is_callable($callback)) {
        throw InvalidArgumentException("Argument 1 must be a callable function.");
    }

    $str = "";

    $cIndex = 0;
    foreach ($array as $cKey => $cValue) {
        $str .= ($cIndex == 0 ? '' : $callback($cKey, $cValue, $cIndex)) . $cValue;
        $cIndex++;
    }

    return $str;
}

Example use:

echo implode_callback(function($cKey, $cValue, $cIndex) {
         return ' (' . $cIndex . ') ';
     }, range(1,5));

// Output: 1 (1) 2 (2) 3 (3) 4 (4) 5

Your case:

$entries = '<ul class="repeatData"><li class="listEntry1">'
    . implode_callback(function($cKey, $cValue, $cIndex) {
          return '</li><li class="listEntry' . ($cIndex + 1) . '">';
      }, $data)
    . '</li></ul>';
share|improve this answer
    
This is an interesting one. I was thinking of a similar answer using sprintf so the pattern could be provided with %s and %d in it for the array contents and the counter, respectively. – grossvogel Oct 21 '13 at 17:17
    
@grossvogel: That would certainly be less expensive, the use of the regex replace at each implode is quite costly. It would probably be more productive to provide a simple implode_callback() function. I will add one. – Orbling Oct 21 '13 at 17:22
    
@grossvogel: Switched it to use a foreach loop in the callback example, rather than the array_walk() as closures being used inside closures is all very well, but tends to confuse people! – Orbling Oct 21 '13 at 17:31

No, implode doesn't work that way. You will need to create your own function to do that.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I was afraid of... – otinanai Oct 21 '13 at 16:42

You should also consider if this is what you really need. In both Javascript and CSS you can easily reference the n-th child of a node if you need to do that.

share|improve this answer
    
Not in this case. I'm dealing with a dynamic amount of containers and selectors are not valid in every case. – otinanai Oct 21 '13 at 16:55

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