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I've an application in spring/spring-mvc that totally uses JSON communications. Now I need to authenticate my application with spring security 3 (that uses LdapAuthenticationProvider) via JSON.

The default spring seurity submit form requires a POST like this:

POST /myapp/j_spring_security_check HTTP/1.1
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length: 32
Host: 127.0.0.1:8080
Connection: Keep-Alive
User-Agent: Apache-HttpClient/4.1.1 (java 1.5)

j_username=myUsername&j_password=myPass

But I want to pass a JSON object like this:

{"j_username":"myUsername","j_password":"myPass"}

I read many post like this, this other or this one without luck, in all ajax cases is done a POST like above.

Any Ideas?

share|improve this question

According with Kevin suggestions,
and after reading this posts: 1, 2, documentation 3, and thanks to this blog post,
I wrote my own FORM_LOGIN_FILTER to directly manage JSON before authentication.
I paste my code for the community.

The goal is to grant both the classical browser form POST authentication with JSON based authentication. Also in JSON authentication I want to avoid the redirect to loginSuccesful.htm

In context:

<security:http use-expressions="true" auto-config="false" entry-point-ref="http403EntryPoint">      
    <security:intercept-url pattern="/logs/**" access="denyAll" />
    <!-- ... All other intercept URL -->

    <security:custom-filter ref="CustomUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter" position="FORM_LOGIN_FILTER "/>
    <security:logout
            invalidate-session="true"
            logout-success-url="/LogoutSuccessful.htm"
            delete-cookies="true"
    />
    <security:session-management>
        <security:concurrency-control max-sessions="1" error-if-maximum-exceeded="true" />
    </security:session-management>
    <security:access-denied-handler error-page="/accessDenied.htm" />
</security:http>

<bean id="CustomUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter" class="path.to.CustomUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter">
    <property name="authenticationManager" ref="authenticationManager" />
    <property name="authenticationSuccessHandler" ref="customSuccessHandler"/>
    <property name="authenticationFailureHandler" ref="failureHandler"/>
    <property name="filterProcessesUrl" value="/j_spring_security_check"/>
    <property name="usernameParameter" value="j_username"/>
    <property name="passwordParameter" value="j_password"/>
</bean>

<bean id="customSuccessHandler" class="path.to.CustomAuthenticationSuccessHandler">
    <property name="defaultTargetUrl" value="/login.htm" />
    <property name="targetUrlParameter" value="/LoginSuccessful.htm" />
</bean>

<bean id="failureHandler" class="org.springframework.security.web.authentication.SimpleUrlAuthenticationFailureHandler">
    <property name="defaultFailureUrl" value="/login.htm" />
</bean>

<bean id="http403EntryPoint" class="org.springframework.security.web.authentication.Http403ForbiddenEntryPoint" />

CustomUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter class:

public class CustomUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter extends UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter{
    private String jsonUsername;
    private String jsonPassword;

    @Override
    protected String obtainPassword(HttpServletRequest request) {
        String password = null; 

        if ("application/json".equals(request.getHeader("Content-Type"))) {
            password = this.jsonPassword;
        }else{
            password = super.obtainPassword(request);
        }

        return password;
    }

    @Override
    protected String obtainUsername(HttpServletRequest request){
        String username = null;

        if ("application/json".equals(request.getHeader("Content-Type"))) {
            username = this.jsonUsername;
        }else{
            username = super.obtainUsername(request);
        }

        return username;
    }

    @Override
    public Authentication attemptAuthentication(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response){
        if ("application/json".equals(request.getHeader("Content-Type"))) {
            try {
                /*
                 * HttpServletRequest can be read only once
                 */
                StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
                String line = null;

                BufferedReader reader = request.getReader();
                while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null){
                    sb.append(line);
                }

                //json transformation
                ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
                LoginRequest loginRequest = mapper.readValue(sb.toString(), LoginRequest.class);

                this.jsonUsername = loginRequest.getUsername();
                this.jsonPassword = loginRequest.getPassword();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        return super.attemptAuthentication(request, response);
    }
}

CustomAuthenticationSuccessHandler class:

public class CustomAuthenticationSuccessHandler extends SimpleUrlAuthenticationSuccessHandler {

    public void onAuthenticationSuccess(
            HttpServletRequest request,
            HttpServletResponse response,
            Authentication auth
    )throws IOException, ServletException {

        if ("application/json".equals(request.getHeader("Content-Type"))) {
            /*
             * USED if you want to AVOID redirect to LoginSuccessful.htm in JSON authentication
             */         
            response.getWriter().print("{\"responseCode\":\"SUCCESS\"}");
            response.getWriter().flush();
        } else {
            super.onAuthenticationSuccess(request, response, auth);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great thanks for sharing the solution. – Kevin Bayes Oct 25 '13 at 8:36
4  
This is not thred safe. The filter is a bean. You should not store the username and password as members i would suggest to save as request attribute or not override obtainUsername and obtainPassword. Se my solution – oe.elvik Dec 3 '13 at 14:05
1  
Yup, I tried this solution out and had this exact issue. Using request attributes instead of member variables fixed the problem. – Keeth Dec 9 '13 at 20:15
public class AuthenticationFilter extends UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter {
    @Override
    public Authentication attemptAuthentication(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response){
        if (!request.getMethod().equals("POST")) {
            throw new AuthenticationServiceException("Authentication method not supported: " + request.getMethod());
        }

        LoginRequest loginRequest = this.getLoginRequest(request);

        UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken authRequest = new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(loginRequest.getUsername(), loginRequest.getPassword());

        setDetails(request, authRequest);

        return this.getAuthenticationManager().authenticate(authRequest);
    }

    private LoginRequest getLoginRequest(HttpServletRequest request) {
        BufferedReader reader = null;
        LoginRequest loginRequest = null;
        try {
            reader = request.getReader();
            Gson gson = new Gson();
            loginRequest = gson.fromJson(reader, LoginRequest.class);
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(AuthenticationFilter.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        } finally {
            try {
                reader.close();
            } catch (IOException ex) {
                Logger.getLogger(AuthenticationFilter.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
        }

        if (loginRequest == null) {
            loginRequest = new LoginRequest();
        }

        return loginRequest;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
OK it's a valid solution. The goal in my class was to respect the original attemptAuthentication flow retrieving and setting username and password and then calling super.attemptAuthentication(...) at the end of the method. Thanks – fl4l Dec 4 '13 at 13:29
3  
Yes, but by saving username and password as members of the bean the solution is not treadsafe. Two users trying to authenticate att the same time might mix username and passwords. One solution would also be saving the username and password in the request object using setAttribute – oe.elvik Dec 6 '13 at 11:49

Another way, according with this post, is to manage manually the spring security authentication directly in the Controller.
In this manner is very simple to manage JSON input and avoid login redirect:

@Autowired
AuthenticationManager authenticationManager;

@ResponseBody
@RequestMapping(value="/login.json", method = RequestMethod.POST)
public JsonResponse mosLogin(@RequestBody LoginRequest loginRequest, HttpServletRequest request) {
    JsonResponse response = null;

    try {
        UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken token = new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(loginRequest.getUsername(), loginRequest.getPassword());
        token.setDetails(new WebAuthenticationDetails(request));

        Authentication auth = authenticationManager.authenticate(token);
        SecurityContext securityContext = SecurityContextHolder.getContext();
        securityContext.setAuthentication(auth);

        if(auth.isAuthenticated()){
            HttpSession session = request.getSession(true);
            session.setAttribute("SPRING_SECURITY_CONTEXT", securityContext);

            LoginResponse loginResponse = new LoginResponse();
            loginResponse.setResponseCode(ResponseCodeType.SUCCESS);
            response = loginResponse;   
        }else{
            SecurityContextHolder.getContext().setAuthentication(null);

            ErrorResponse errorResponse = new ErrorResponse();
            errorResponse.setResponseCode(ResponseCodeType.ERROR);
            response = errorResponse;
        }   
    } catch (Exception e) {     
        ErrorResponse errorResponse = new ErrorResponse();
        errorResponse.setResponseCode(ResponseCodeType.ERROR);
        response = errorResponse;           
    }
    return response;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would prefer the filter, the above is basically just a request in a controller and I feel it should not be mixed and the filter gives a nice separation between security and the controllers. Personal opinion. – Kevin Bayes Oct 25 '13 at 8:35
    
I have the same opinion, i prefer filters because are in the "security layer" that is managed before coming into controllers. From the point of view of security, you think that this solution is less secure than the filter solution? is there a potential security exposition? – fl4l Oct 27 '13 at 20:19

Just an update for the community

you can easily do this via spring security 3.2.

Add the following class to tell the war that it is spring security enabled app

import org.springframework.security.web.context.*;
//you can give any class name but must implement AbstractSecurityWebApplicationInitializer
public class MessageSecurityWebApplicationInitializer
        extends AbstractSecurityWebApplicationInitializer {
}

The following class is for security config. you don't need xml configuration anymore

import com.mycompany.mavenproject2.sample.data.UserDetailsServiceImpl;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.ComponentScan;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;
import org.springframework.security.authentication.AuthenticationManager;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.authentication.builders.AuthenticationManagerBuilder;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.builders.HttpSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.configuration.WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter;
import org.springframework.security.config.annotation.web.servlet.configuration.EnableWebMvcSecurity;
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UserDetails;
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UserDetailsService;

import javax.sql.DataSource;

@Configuration
@EnableWebMvcSecurity
@ComponentScan(basePackageClasses = UserDetailsServiceImpl.class)
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired
    UserDetailsService userDetailsService;

    @Autowired
    public void configureGlobal(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
        auth.userDetailsService(userDetailsService);
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http
                .authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/resources/**", "/signup").permitAll()
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and()
                .formLogin().loginPage("/login")
                .permitAll()
                .and()
                .logout().permitAll();
    }


}

and the user details //here you manupulate the way you want to get your user data see section //@1

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.security.core.GrantedAuthority;
import org.springframework.security.core.authority.SimpleGrantedAuthority;
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UserDetails;
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UserDetailsService;
import org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.UsernameNotFoundException;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Service;
import org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional;


@Service("userDetailsService")
public class UserDetailsServiceImpl implements UserDetailsService {

    @Override
    @Transactional(readOnly = true)
    public UserDetails loadUserByUsername(String userName) throws UsernameNotFoundException {
            //@1
            String password = "123";
            Collection<GrantedAuthority> authorities = new ArrayList<GrantedAuthority>();
            authorities.add(new SimpleGrantedAuthority("ROLE_USER"));
            org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.User secureUser = new org.springframework.security.core.userdetails.
                    User(userName, password, true, true, true, true, authorities);
            return secureUser;
    }

}

for complete project follow the github link below

https://github.com/lynas/springsecurity3.2  
(2dd0a14b1409b30438dde8fd470fc553be25ac45) 
commit-6 (working with basic security)
share|improve this answer
4  
If I am not mistaken, this answer does not address the issue of parsing a JSON body as opposed to a form. – Mark Roper Feb 7 '15 at 18:09

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