Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a 'Posixy' way to open an URL, preferrably in the default browser? I would like to do something like

ShellExecute(0, _T("open"), url, 0, 0, SW_SHOWDEFAULT);

that works on GNU/Linux and MAC. I read some answer saying that`

if (fork() == 0)
    system("sensible-browser http://wherever.com");

does the trick on Debian systems at least. Is there an easy way to extend this to something that works on other distributions and Mac OS X?

share|improve this question
    
I take it back about a duplicate. Related link: stackoverflow.com/questions/1949531/… –  dmckee Dec 23 '09 at 1:07
    
I wouldn't rely on Posix support on MacOSX for such things because it might break with what their users expect. –  Georg Fritzsche Dec 23 '09 at 1:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

On a Mac, you can just use the open command. open http://www.google.com from the Terminal opens a new Chrome tab for me. Just wrap that up in a system call.

share|improve this answer

On Linux you should try launching your URL with the xdg-open command. Newer distributions should launch the user's preferred browser when that command is called. It'll even try to launch links if there's no GUI running.

Obviously there's nothing in POSIX with respect to a GUI desktop environment. Projects like freedesktop.org exist to fill that role. It attempts to define some basic functionality that will work in all Unix-like desktops, such as GNOME and KDE.

Doing fork() and calling system(), instead of exec() is undefined behavior on POSIX, so I don't recommend that.

share|improve this answer
    
So system() is only defined for parent processes? I'm not saying your wrong but I don't understand why since a forked process has its own address space and all. To me that's like saying you cant use printf() after you fork. –  SiegeX Dec 23 '09 at 2:57
    
I can't see why system() is undefined behavior on POSIX after fork() either, can you cite the relevant part of the POSIX standard? Thanks. –  Chris Young Dec 23 '09 at 7:09
    
Fork() must be followed by exec(). In between you may only call async-signal-safe functions. System() is not guaranteed to be async signal safe, neither is printf. –  karunski Dec 23 '09 at 16:27
1  
    
Calling system() after a fork doesn't make sense. You could do fork, exec, and then system(), but then it's redundant. –  karunski Dec 23 '09 at 16:30

A user's browser preference is not really something the POSIX standard concerns itself with that I'm aware of.

share|improve this answer

One way might be the $BROWSER variable. Xorg provides xrdb, which is the preffered way for this environment, but this wont get you anywhere on Mac OS X, I assume.

share|improve this answer

There’s no portable way to achieve this. On Mac OS X the solution would be to use LSOpenCFURLRef or other LaunchServices API to open the URL with the default handler for the URL scheme. Other platforms will do things differently.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.