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I want to read a text file which contains a billions of numbers, I want to store each 10 digit together and then counts the next 10 digit together and so on ... for example : my file will contain 123456789123456789123456789 my first 10 digit number will be: 1234567891 my second digit number will be:2345678912 and so on I know that the below code can read an integer numbers from a file

#include<stdio.h>

    int main()
    {
            FILE *ptr_file;
            char buf[1000];

            ptr_file =fopen("num.txt","r");
            if (!ptr_file)
                return 1;

            while (fgets(buf,1000, ptr_file)!=NULL)
                printf("%s",buf);

        fclose(ptr_file);
            return 0;
    }

but how to read 10 digit in each time?

share|improve this question
    
Do you need to handle the digits as numbers or as text? You could read the buffer 10 bytes at a time, and store it in a char*, if you only need the text. If you want to make it a number it is a bit more complicated. – ThunderGr Oct 21 '13 at 19:59
    
yea I want to store them as integers on a linked list – arze ramade Oct 23 '13 at 2:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you don't want to store them as integer, so can have same approach, to fill the 10 digits in buf as C strings (null terminated)

while ( fgets(buf, 11, ptr_file) !=NULL )
   printf("%s\n",buf);
share|improve this answer
    
This assumes that the numbers are stored as a separate string each and not continuously. I do not think this is guaranteed, it depends on the way the digits were stored. It is quite common to strip the '\0' before saving to conserve space on the file and make sure it is a multiple of 10(or whatever the size of your numbers is, when they have a fixed length). – ThunderGr Oct 23 '13 at 2:37

Use:

ptr_file =fopen("num.txt","rb");

while(fread(buf, 1, 10, ptr_file) != 10) {
}

But, if you need to do this quick - I recommend open file by mmap(), and use quick custom atou() over the mmapped buffer.

share|improve this answer

Since all chunks of data are 10 byte, be sure to start by reading 10 byes at a time.
As data could be >= power(2,32), use type unsigned long long or uint64_t for subsequent numeric processing.

inf = fopen("num.txt", "rb");  // Open in binary
#define ChunkSize (10)
char buf[ChunkSize + 1];         // Extra for \0
buf[ChunkSize] = '\0';
int result;
while((result = fread(buf, ChunkSize, 1, inf)) == 1) {
  unsigned long long x;
  char *endptr;
  x = strtoull(buf, 10, &endptr);
  if (endptr != &buf[ChunkSize]) {
    break;  // Syntax error
  }
  // Do something with x or buf;
}
if (result == 0) {
  ; // handle I/O error
}
share|improve this answer
#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
        FILE *ptr_file;
        char buf[1000];
        char tendigits[11];

        ptr_file =fopen("num.txt","r");
        if (!ptr_file)
            return 1;

        while (fgets(buf,1000, ptr_file)!=NULL)
        {
            int counter = 0;
            do
            {
                 for(int loop=0;loop<10;loop++) tendigits[loop]=buf[counter+loop];
                 tendigits[10]='\0';
                 /*Process the tendigits string here*/
                 counter+=10;
            }while(counter<1000);
        }

    fclose(ptr_file);
    return 0;
}

Of course, this is just an example. You have to take in account that the file might not be a multiple of 1000 and adjust accordingly.

EDIT: In case your stored digits contain '\0', then the size of your buffer must be a multiple of 11 and adjust the example I have given to 11 digits, removing the addition of the '\0'.

share|improve this answer
       #include <stdio.h>
       #include<sys/types.h>
       #include<sys/unistd.h>
       #include <math.h>
       enum  //these are modes to open the file
       { 
           reading=0; 
           writing=1;
           readwrite=2;
       }
       int main()
       {
           unsigned long int a[10];
           int file_1,i=0,lim,pid,j,k=0,res;
           if((pid=fork())==0) //child process
           {
               file_1=open("Program_name",mode); //program name has to be the path
               if(file_1<0)
               {
                   exit(1);
               }
               else
               {
                   while(1)
                   {
                       i=0;
                       j=9;
                       res=0;
                       while(i<10)
                       {
                           lim=read(file_1,&ch,sizeof(char));
                           if(lim<=0)
                           {
                               exit(2);
                           }
                           dig=convert(&ch);
                           res=res+dig*pow(10,j); //code to make a 10 digit number
                           j--;
                       }
                       a[k]=res;
                       k++;
                   }  
               }
               close(file_1);
           } //child process ends here
           else //parent process begins here
           {
               /*code that use the digits above */
           }
           return 0;
       }
       int converter(char *p) //this function coverts char to integer
       { 
           int num;
           *p=*p-'0';
           num=(int)*p;
           return num;
       }    
share|improve this answer
    
I hope this helps. My program first takes the individual characters from a file and then converts them into integers and then takes ten integers at a time and converts them into a number of 10 digits and stores that into the array. You can vary the size of that array. I didn't do that or you could dynamically allocate memory as storing that amount of data on the stack would cause an overflow. – Rahul Chitta Jan 16 '14 at 8:54
    
Why do you use fork to solve this problem? I think it is too exaggerated and there is no need to do so. – pzaenger Jan 16 '14 at 9:46

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