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I'm comparing a reference sequence of size 5500 bases and query sequence of size 3600, using dynamic programming (semi global alignment), in fact I don't know much about complexity and performance and the code is blowing up and giving me the error "out of memory". Knowing that it works normally on smaller sequences, my question is: This behavior is normal or I might have another problem in code ?if it's normal any hint to solve this problem ? Thanks in advance.

sub semiGlobal {
    my ( $seq1, $seq2,$MATCH,$MISMATCH,$GAP ) = @_;
    # initialization: first row to 0 ;
    my @matrix;
    $matrix[0][0]{score}   = 0;
    $matrix[0][0]{pointer} = "none";
    for ( my $j = 1 ; $j <= length($seq1) ; $j++ ) {
        $matrix[0][$j]{score}   = 0;
        $matrix[0][$j]{pointer} = "none";
    }

    for ( my $i = 1 ; $i <= length($seq2) ; $i++ ) {
        $matrix[$i][0]{score}   = $GAP * $i;
        $matrix[$i][0]{pointer} = "up";
    }

    # fill
    my $max_i     = 0;
    my $max_j     = 0;
    my $max_score = 0;

    print "seq2: ".length($seq2);
    print "seq1: ".length($seq1);

    for ( my $i = 1 ; $i <= length($seq2) ; $i++ ) {
        for ( my $j = 1 ; $j <= length($seq1) ; $j++ ) {
            my ( $diagonal_score, $left_score, $up_score );
            # calculate match score
            my $letter1 = substr( $seq1, $j - 1, 1 );
            my $letter2 = substr( $seq2, $i - 1, 1 );
            if ( $letter1 eq $letter2 ) {
                $diagonal_score = $matrix[ $i - 1 ][ $j - 1 ]{score} +  $MATCH;
            }
            else {
                $diagonal_score = $matrix[ $i - 1 ][ $j - 1 ]{score} +  $MISMATCH;
            }

            # calculate gap scores
            $up_score   = $matrix[ $i - 1 ][$j]{score} +  $GAP;
            $left_score = $matrix[$i][ $j - 1 ]{score} +  $GAP;

            # choose best score
            if ( $diagonal_score >= $up_score ) {
                if ( $diagonal_score >= $left_score ) {
                    $matrix[$i][$j]{score}   = $diagonal_score;
                    $matrix[$i][$j]{pointer} = "diagonal";
                }
                else {
                    $matrix[$i][$j]{score}   = $left_score;
                    $matrix[$i][$j]{pointer} = "left";
                }
            }
            else {
                if ( $up_score >= $left_score ) {
                    $matrix[$i][$j]{score}   = $up_score;
                    $matrix[$i][$j]{pointer} = "up";
                }
                else {
                    $matrix[$i][$j]{score}   = $left_score;
                    $matrix[$i][$j]{pointer} = "left";
                }
            }

            # set maximum score
            if ( $matrix[$i][$j]{score} > $max_score ) {
                $max_i     = $i;
                $max_j     = $j;
                $max_score = $matrix[$i][$j]{score};
            }
        }
    }

    my $align1 = "";
    my $align2 = "";
    my $j = $max_j;
    my $i = $max_i;

    while (1) {
        if ( $matrix[$i][$j]{pointer} eq "none" ) {
            $stseq1 = $j;
            last;
        }

        if ( $matrix[$i][$j]{pointer} eq "diagonal" ) {
            $align1 .= substr( $seq1, $j - 1, 1 );
            $align2 .= substr( $seq2, $i - 1, 1 );
            $i--;
            $j--;
        }
        elsif ( $matrix[$i][$j]{pointer} eq "left" ) {
            $align1 .= substr( $seq1, $j - 1, 1 );
            $align2 .= "-";
            $j--;
        }
        elsif ( $matrix[$i][$j]{pointer} eq "up" ) {
            $align1 .= "-";
            $align2 .= substr( $seq2, $i - 1, 1 );
            $i--;
        }
    }

    $align1 = reverse $align1;
    $align2 = reverse $align2;
    return ( $align1, $align2, $stseq1 ,$max_j);
}
share|improve this question
2  
Can you post some code? It could be something like having two loops nested and scanning through your data –  KeepCalmAndCarryOn Oct 21 '13 at 19:18
1  
You are most probably using a two dimensional matrix to store the DP. You can modify it to use an array of length n (where n is the length of smaller sequence). –  ElKamina Oct 21 '13 at 19:21
1  
We definitely need to see some code! As ElKamina said, it's possible to make it use O(min(n, m)) space (this trick is due to Dan Hirschberg), though this is not exactly trivial -- I would not bother attempting this improvement if you are still going to leave the code in a slow interpreted language like Perl. –  j_random_hacker Oct 21 '13 at 21:57
    
the code is customized from this link etutorials.org/Misc/blast/Part+II+Theory/… –  Mariya Oct 22 '13 at 12:24
2  
The code has at least quadratic complexity (processing NxM matrix). Also, if the sequence size is about 5000 we'll end up with an array of 25* 1000 * 1000 ~ roughly 25 million entries. Every entry is a dictionary holding a string and a number. If we assume that a string is 32 bytes, that means almost 1GB for the matrix alone. Using a numeric code instead of "up","left" etc, even assuming that a numeric will be 4 bytes, will make the array size about 10 times less ("only" 100MB, though I am not counting the overhead for the matrix entries), so this is the first thing I'd try. –  Ashalynd Oct 24 '13 at 9:55

2 Answers 2

One way to possibly solve the problem is to tie the @matrix with a file. However, this will dramatically slow down the program. Consider this:

sub semiGlobal {

    use Tie::Array::CSV; 

    tie my @matrix, 'Tie::Array::CSV', 'temp.txt'; # Don't forget to add your own error handler.


    my ( $seq1, $seq2,$MATCH,$MISMATCH,$GAP ) = @_;

    # initialization: first row to 0 ;

    $matrix[0][0] = '0 n';
    for ( my $j = 1 ; $j <= length($seq1) ; $j++ ) {
        $matrix[0][$j] = '0 n';
    }

    for ( my $i = 1 ; $i <= length($seq2) ; $i++ ) {

        my $score = $GAP * $i;
        $matrix[$i][0] = join ' ',$score,'u';
    }

    #print Dumper(\@matrix);

    # fill
    my $max_i     = 0;
    my $max_j     = 0;
    my $max_score = 0;

    print "seq2: ".length($seq2)."\n";
    print "seq1: ".length($seq1)."\n";

    for ( my $i = 1 ; $i <= length($seq2) ; $i++ ) {
        for ( my $j = 1 ; $j <= length($seq1) ; $j++ ) {
            my ( $diagonal_score, $left_score, $up_score );

            # calculate match score
            my $letter1 = substr( $seq1, $j - 1, 1 );
            my $letter2 = substr( $seq2, $i - 1, 1 );
            my $score = (split / /, $matrix[ $i - 1 ][ $j - 1 ])[0];
            if ( $letter1 eq $letter2 ) {
                $diagonal_score = $score +  $MATCH;
            }
            else {
                $diagonal_score = $score +  $MISMATCH;
            }

            # calculate gap scores
            $up_score   = (split / /,$matrix[ $i - 1 ][$j])[0] +  $GAP;
            $left_score = (split / /,$matrix[$i][ $j - 1 ])[0] +  $GAP;

            # choose best score
            if ( $diagonal_score >= $up_score ) {
                if ( $diagonal_score >= $left_score ) {
                    $matrix[$i][$j] = join ' ',$diagonal_score,'d';
                }
                else {
                    $matrix[$i][$j] = join ' ', $left_score, 'l';
                }
            }
            else {
                if ( $up_score >= $left_score ) {
                    $matrix[$i][$j] = join ' ', $up_score, 'u';
                }
                else {
                    $matrix[$i][$j] = join ' ', $left_score, 'l';
                }
            }

            # set maximum score
            if ( (split / /, $matrix[$i][$j])[0] > $max_score ) {
                $max_i     = $i;
                $max_j     = $j;
                $max_score = (split / /, $matrix[$i][$j])[0];

            }
        }
    }


    my $align1 = "";
    my $align2 = "";
    my $stseq1;

    my $j = $max_j;
    my $i = $max_i;

    while (1) {
        my $pointer = (split / /, $matrix[$i][$j])[1];
        if ( $pointer eq "n" ) {
            $stseq1 = $j;
            last;
        }

        if ( $pointer eq "d" ) {
            $align1 .= substr( $seq1, $j - 1, 1 );
            $align2 .= substr( $seq2, $i - 1, 1 );
            $i--;
            $j--;
        }
        elsif ( $pointer eq "l" ) {
            $align1 .= substr( $seq1, $j - 1, 1 );
            $align2 .= "-";
            $j--;
        }
        elsif ( $pointer eq "u" ) {
            $align1 .= "-";
            $align2 .= substr( $seq2, $i - 1, 1 );
            $i--;
        }
    }

    $align1 = reverse $align1;
    $align2 = reverse $align2;

    untie @matrix; # Don't forget to add your own error handler.

    unlink 'temp.txt'; # Don't forget to add your own error handler.

    return ( $align1, $align2, $stseq1 ,$max_j);
} 

You can still use your original sub for short sequences, and switch to this sub for long ones.

share|improve this answer
    
didnt work took too long time and got no results –  Mariya Oct 30 '13 at 21:46

I think that @j_random_hacker and @Ashalynd are on the right track regarding using this algorithm in most Perl implementations. The datatypes you're using are going to use more memory that absolutely needed for the calculations.

So this is "normal" in that you should expect to see this kind of memory usage for how you've written this algorithm in perl. You may have other problems in surrounding code that are using a lot of memory but this algorithm will hit your memory hard with large sequences.

You can address some of the memory issues by changing the datatypes that you're using as @Ashalynd suggests. You could try changing the hash which holds score and pointer into an array and changing the string pointers into integer values. Something like this might get you some benefit while still maintaining readability:

use strict;
use warnings;

# define constants for array positions and pointer values
# so the code is still readable.
# (If you have the "Readonly" CPAN module you may want to use it for constants
# instead although none of the downsides of the "constant" pragma apply in this code.)
use constant {
  SCORE => 0,
  POINTER => 1,

  DIAGONAL => 0,
  LEFT => 1,
  UP => 2,
  NONE => 3,
};

...

sub semiGlobal2 {
  my ( $seq1, $seq2,$MATCH,$MISMATCH,$GAP ) = @_;

  # initialization: first row to 0 ;
  my @matrix;

  # score and pointer are now stored in an array
  # using the defined constants as indices
  $matrix[0][0][SCORE]   = 0;

  # pointer value is now a constant integer
  $matrix[0][0][POINTER] = NONE;

  for ( my $j = 1 ; $j <= length($seq1) ; $j++ ) {
      $matrix[0][$j][SCORE]   = 0;
      $matrix[0][$j][POINTER] = NONE;
  }

  for ( my $i = 1 ; $i <= length($seq2) ; $i++ ) {

      $matrix[$i][0][SCORE]   = $GAP * $i;
      $matrix[$i][0][POINTER] = UP;
  }

... # continue to make the appropriate changes throughout the code

However, when I tested this I didn't get a huge benefit when attempting to align a 3600 char string in a 5500 char string of random data. I programmed my code to abort when it consumed more than 2GB of memory. The original code aborted after 23 seconds while the one using constants and an array instead of a hash aborted after 32 seconds.

If you really want to use this specific algorithm I'd check out the performance of Algorithm::NeedlemanWunsch. It doesn't look like it's very mature but it may have addressed your performance issues. Otherwise look into writing an Inline or Perl XS wrapper around a C implementation

share|improve this answer
    
A reference to a single array having two scalars, is cheaper than two arrays having a single scalar. Like: $matrix[$x][$y] = [ 'score', 'pointer'] My testing showed a savings of just under 10%. –  Jim Black Oct 28 '13 at 2:44
    
@JimBlack Are you suggesting that the code in my answer has "two arrays having a single scalar"? I'm not sure where you're seeing this. –  benrifkah Oct 28 '13 at 15:52

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