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If I want to select all records in a table that have not been processed yet and then update those records to reflect that they have been processed, I would do the following:

 SELECT * FROM [dbo].[MyTable] WHERE [flag] IS NULL;
 UPDATE [dbo].[MyTable] SET [flag] = 1 WHERE [flag] IS NULL;

How do I ensure that the UPDATE works on only the records I just selected, ie, prevent the UPDATE of any records that may have been added with [flag] = NULL that occurred AFTER my SELECT but before my UPDATE by another process? Can I wrap those two statements in a transaction? Do I have to put a lock on the table?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Single call, no transaction needed by using the OUTPUT clause.

XLOCK exclusively locks the rows to stop concurrent reads (eg another process looking for NULL rows)

UPDATE dbo.MyTable WITH (XLOCK)
SET flag = 1 
OUTPUT INSERTED.*
WHERE flag IS NULL;
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1  
What's the earliest version of SQL Server that supports the OUTPUT clause? –  OMG Ponies Dec 23 '09 at 7:38
1  
SQL Server 2005, which should be a fair assumption to make in (almost) 2010... –  gbn Dec 23 '09 at 7:40
    
..and given OP uses SSIS too, based on other questions. –  gbn Dec 23 '09 at 7:41
    
yes, i was interested in 2k5, sorry, i should've mentioned that. this looks like the winner for my purposes -- thanks! –  heath Dec 23 '09 at 17:04

Use the OUTPUT clause to return a result set from the UPDATE itself:

UPDATE [dbo].[MyTable] 
SET [flag] = 1 
OUTPUT INSERTED.*
WHERE [flag] IS NULL;
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Use:

SELECT * 
  FROM [dbo].[MyTable] (UPDLOCK)
 WHERE [flag] IS NULL;

UPDATE [dbo].[MyTable] 
   SET [flag] = 1 
 WHERE [flag] IS NULL;

For more info on locking hints:

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1  
+1. Note that this would need to be in a transaction for the update lock to carry through to the update statement. –  womp Dec 23 '09 at 3:22
    
Still 2 statements though that aren't needed with SQL Server 2005 + –  gbn Dec 23 '09 at 7:33

You can wrap these two statements in a transaction with read_committed or more restricted scope. Its a bit expensive and might cause other issues. King's solution is more workable.

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