Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to create a deep-copy of a NSMutableDictionary and assign it to another NSMutableDictionary. The dictionary contains a bunch of arrays, each array containing names, and the key is an alphabet (the first letter of those names). So one entry in the dictionary is 'A' -> 'Adam', 'Apple'. Here's what I saw in a book, but I'm not sure if it works:

- (NSMutableDictionary *) mutableDeepCopy
{
    NSMutableDictionary * ret = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithCapacity: [self count]];
    NSArray *keys = [self allKeys];

    for (id key in keys)
    {
        id oneValue = [self valueForKey:key]; // should return the array
        id oneCopy = nil;

        if ([oneValue respondsToSelector: @selector(mutableDeepCopy)])
        {
            oneCopy = [oneValue mutableDeepCopy];
        }
        if ([oneValue respondsToSelector:@selector(mutableCopy)])
        {
            oneCopy = [oneValue mutableCopy];
        }

        if (oneCopy == nil) // not sure if this is needed
        {   
            oneCopy = [oneValue copy];
        }
        [ret setValue:oneCopy forKey:key];

        //[oneCopy release];
    }
    return ret;
}
  • should the [onecopy release] be there or not?
  • Here's how I'm going to call this method:

    self.namesForAlphabets = [self.allNames mutableDeepCopy];

Will that be ok? Or will it cause a leak? (assume that I declare self.namesForAlphabets as a property, and release it in dealloc).

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

IMPORTANT: The question (and my code below) both deal with a very specific case, in which the NSMutableDictionary contains only arrays of strings. These solutions will not work for more complex examples. For more general case solutions, see the following:


Answer for this specific case:

Your code should work, but you will definitely need the [oneCopy release]. The new dictionary will retain the copied objects when you add them with setValue:forKey, so if you do not call [oneCopy release], all of those objects will be retained twice.

A good rule of thumb: if you alloc, retain or copy something, you must also release it.

Note: here is some sample code that would work for certain cases only. This works because your NSMutableDictionary contains only arrays of strings (no further deep copying required):

- (NSMutableDictionary *)mutableDeepCopy
{
    NSMutableDictionary * ret = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc]
                                  initWithCapacity:[self count]];

    NSMutableArray * array;

    for (id key in [self allKeys])
    {
        array = [(NSArray *)[self objectForKey:key] mutableCopy];
        [ret setValue:array forKey:key];
        [array release];
    }

    return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, but the "copy" makes the NSArray (or NSMutableArray) immutable in the new dictionary. So that's not going to work. – Z S Dec 23 '09 at 4:54
3  
replaced 'copy' with 'mutableCopy' and it's fine. – Z S Dec 23 '09 at 5:25
    
Ah, yes. Sorry! That should definitely have been mutableCopy. I made the change in my answer. – e.James Dec 23 '09 at 14:59
1  
There is also a typo in the middle of for loop - replace setValue:copy with setValue:array – dig May 9 '11 at 22:44
1  
@Krishnabhadra: Yes, you will definitely need to implement NSCopying if you are using custom objects. The original question dealt only with NSArray objects. – e.James Jul 19 '11 at 16:33

Because of toll-free bridging, you can also use the CoreFoundation function CFPropertyListCreateDeepCopy:

NSMutableDictionary *mutableCopy = (NSMutableDictionary *)CFPropertyListCreateDeepCopy(kCFAllocatorDefault, (CFDictionaryRef)originalDictionary, kCFPropertyListMutableContainers);
share|improve this answer
    
Cool. This works great. Except, for some reason it registers as a leak in performance tool. Any idea what that's about? – Jonah Aug 25 '10 at 13:54
2  
It follows Core Foundation's "create" rule, so you need to make sure you release or autorelease the returned dictionary (or just not retain it if you want to keep it around). – Wevah Aug 25 '10 at 16:01
    
So it seems you'd have to call: CFRelease(mutableCopy); when you need to release the object. Thanks! – Jonah Aug 25 '10 at 23:40
11  
this only works if there are only property-list-values though. if it encounters anything else it just returns NULL – Ahti Nov 30 '11 at 15:32
3  
I think you have to use CFBridgeRelease. For an array it is, mutableArray = (NSMutableArray *)CFBridgingRelease(CFPropertyListCreateDeepCopy(kCFAllocatorDefault, (CFArrayRef)oldArrat, kCFPropertyListMutableContainers)); – honkskillet Aug 29 '14 at 9:13

Assuming all elements of the array implement the NSCoding protocol, you can do deep copies via archiving because archiving will preserve the mutability of objects.

Something like this:

id DeepCopyViaArchiving(id<NSCoding> anObject)
{
    NSData* archivedData = [NSKeyedArchiver archivedDataWithRootObject:anObject];
    return [[NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:archivedData] retain];
}

This isn't particularly efficient, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Does this method return a mutable deep copy or an immutable deep copy? – dreamlax Dec 23 '09 at 3:04
2  
Whatever you put into it. If you put in an NSMutableArray, you get back an NSMutableArray. – Tom Dalling Dec 23 '09 at 4:28
    
@dreamlax if not, you could just create a mutable version of it with mutableCopy – 亚历山大 Feb 10 '15 at 14:57
1  
@亚历山大: That would just create a mutable "top-level" but any nested container objects would still be immutable. – dreamlax Feb 12 '15 at 2:35
    
Ok, sorry your right. In my case, I didn't have any nested containers which needed to be mutable. – 亚历山大 Feb 16 '15 at 11:42

Another technique that I have seen (which is not at all very efficient) is to use an NSPropertyListSerialization object to serialise your dictionary, then you de-serialise it but specify that you want mutable leaves and containers.


NSString *errorString = nil;
NSData *binData = 
  [NSPropertyListSerialization dataFromPropertyList:self.allNames
                                             format:NSPropertyListBinaryFormat_v1_0
                                        errorString:&errorString];

if (errorString) {
    // Something bad happened
    [errorString release];
}

self.namesForAlphabets = 
 [NSPropertyListSerialization propertyListFromData:binData
                                  mutabilityOption:NSPropertyListMutableContainersAndLeaves
                                            format:NULL
                                  errorDescription:&errorString];

if (errorString) {
    // something bad happened
    [errorString release];
}

Again, this is not at all efficient.

share|improve this answer
1  
why is this method inefficient? – JTAppleCalendar for iOS Swift Sep 23 '13 at 23:19

Trying to figure out by checking respondToSelector(@selector(mutableCopy)) won't give the desired results as all NSObject-based objects respond to this selector (it's part of NSObject). Instead we have to query if an object conforms to NSMutableCopying or at least NSCopying. Here's my answer based on this gist mentioned in the accepted answer:

For NSDictionary:

@implementation NSDictionary (MutableDeepCopy)

//  As seen here (in the comments): https://gist.github.com/yfujiki/1664847
- (NSMutableDictionary *)mutableDeepCopy
{
    NSMutableDictionary *returnDict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithCapacity:self.count];

    NSArray *keys = [self allKeys];

    for(id key in keys) {
        id oneValue = [self objectForKey:key];
        id oneCopy = nil;

        if([oneValue respondsToSelector:@selector(mutableDeepCopy)]) {
            oneCopy = [oneValue mutableDeepCopy];
        } else if([oneValue conformsToProtocol:@protocol(NSMutableCopying)]) {
            oneCopy = [oneValue mutableCopy];
        } else if([oneValue conformsToProtocol:@protocol(NSCopying)]){
            oneCopy = [oneValue copy];
        } else {
            oneCopy = oneValue;
        }

        [returnDict setValue:oneCopy forKey:key];
    }

    return returnDict;
}

@end

For NSArray:

@implementation NSArray (MutableDeepCopy)

- (NSMutableArray *)mutableDeepCopy
{
    NSMutableArray *returnArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:self.count];

    for(id oneValue in self) {
        id oneCopy = nil;

        if([oneValue respondsToSelector:@selector(mutableDeepCopy)]) {
            oneCopy = [oneValue mutableDeepCopy];
        } else if([oneValue conformsToProtocol:@protocol(NSMutableCopying)]) {
            oneCopy = [oneValue mutableCopy];
        } else if([oneValue conformsToProtocol:@protocol(NSCopying)]){
            oneCopy = [oneValue copy];
        } else {
            oneCopy = oneValue;
        }

        [returnArray addObject:oneCopy];
    }

    return returnArray;
}

@end

Both methods have the same internal to-copy-or-not-to-copy logic and that could be extracted into a separate method but I left it like this for clarity.

share|improve this answer

Thought I'd update with an answer if you're using ARC.

The solution Weva has provided works just fine. Nowadays you could do it like this:

NSMutableDictionary *mutableCopy = (NSMutableDictionary *)CFBridgingRelease(CFPropertyListCreateDeepCopy(kCFAllocatorDefault, (CFDictionaryRef)originalDict, kCFPropertyListMutableContainers));
share|improve this answer
2  
kCFPropertyListMutableContainersAndLeaves is maybe also what you want, which makes the mutability deeper. – Tom Andersen Sep 23 '15 at 21:36

For ARC - note kCFPropertyListMutableContainersAndLeaves for truly deep mutability.

    NSMutableDictionary* mutableDict = (NSMutableDictionary *)
      CFBridgingRelease(
          CFPropertyListCreateDeepCopy(kCFAllocatorDefault, 
           (CFDictionaryRef)someNSDict, 
           kCFPropertyListMutableContainersAndLeaves));
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't work for me - mutableDict is always nil. – Sean Dev Oct 12 '15 at 17:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.