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When naming a method using the OOP paradigm, do you prefix the method with "get" only if it returns a member variable? Or would it be OOP appropriate to add "get" into the name even if it is returns a value calculated from a member variable, but not the member variable it self?

For example, this is supposed to be correct:

private int count = 0;    
public int getCount() {
    return count;
}

Would this violate naming convention:

public int getCountPlusOne() {
    return count + 1;
}

Sorry, I am a perfectionist.

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The name should clearly indicate what it does. If it's called getCount but doesn't return count, that's confusing. –  SLaks Oct 21 '13 at 20:41
    
That would be fine. –  GriffeyDog Oct 21 '13 at 20:42
    
The only problem with such a method is if you expect to use it with a 3rd party library that expects Java Bean naming conventions for your classes –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 21 '13 at 20:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

would it be OOP appropriate to add "get" into the name even if it is returns a value calculated from a member variable, but not the member variable it self?

Naming of getters and setters in Java is not governed by any "OOP principles" - it's purely a JavaBeans convention:

The class properties must be accessible using get, set, is (used for boolean properties instead of get), and other methods (so-called accessor methods and mutator methods) according to a standard naming convention. This allows easy automated inspection and updating of bean state within frameworks, many of which include custom editors for various types of properties. Setters can have one or more than one argument.

Note how the convention deliberately calls the values being accessed through getters and setters "properties", to distinguish them from fields. The intention behind this has been to cover both calculated and stored properties.

This leads to an answer to your question: it is entirely appropriate to use the "get" prefix for getters of calculated properties.

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Actually, one reason to provide accessor methods is that they don't need to correspond to member variables. So as long as the name after get is descriptive, then its a valid name.

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It might be handy to distinguish between the "properties" of a class, and the "fields" of a class. Roughly speaking, properties are things that you have getters and setters for. So if you have methods public Color getColor() and public void setColor(Color color), then you can say that "color" is a property.

In many cases, the fields of a class are the same as its properties. But they don't have to be. For example, a class with a property called "color" might have fields int redComponent; int greenComponent; and int blueComponent;. Users of the getters and setters for the "color" property shouldn't care how it's stored internally.

So, getting back to your question, if it makes sense to the users of your class for there to be a property called "count plus one", then by all means have one; and implement it however you like.

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Simple answer. No it would not violate any naming conventions I know of.

Only thing is that the name should indicate what the method does as clearly as possible. So in your case getCountPlusOne is a damn good method name as it does exactly that, i.e. returns count + 1.

The convention to follow regarding naming methods in java is as follows:

Methods should be verbs in lowerCamelCase; that is, with the first letter lowercase and the first letters of subsequent words in uppercase.

So as you see there is nothing in relation with OOP paradigm and java method conventions as such.

For more, read here and there.

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It would not violate any naming convention but you won't be able to use reusable components like JavaBeans and also people working on the same projects also assumes getters in typical way they are always assigned so you don't want to change tradition as far as it is possible to go with the flow.

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My 2 cents,

private int count = 0;    
public int getCount() {
    return count;
}


public int getCountPlusOne() {
    return this.getCount() + 1;
}

But personnaly, I would prefer something like

public int getCountIncremented( int increment ) {
    int new_increment = increment;

    if( increment == NULL ) {
       new_increment = 1;
    }

    return this.getCount() + new_increment;
}

I didn't search if you can have default value for a parameter in java. It could be interesting...

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