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I have a SQL Server 2008 table with two XML columns and the following structure:

JOB_ID int,
RECORD_NO int,
SOURCE_DATA xml,
TARGET_DATA xml

Some sample data:

JOB_ID RECORD_NO SOURCE_DATA                                   TARGET_DATA
------ --------- --------------------------------------------  ----------------
     1         1 <data><field id="C_ID">1684</field>...</data> <data/>
     1         2 <data><field id="C_ID">9817</field>...</data> <data/>
     1         3 <data><field id="C_ID">6508</field>...</data> <data/>

The root <data> node in SOURCE_DATA is guaranteed to have a known set of child <field> nodes, with each child node uniquely identified by an "id" attribute. For example, a typical row might contain a SOURCE_DATA column that looks like this:

<data>
  <field id="C_ID">1684</field>
  <field id="C_FNAME">John</field>
  <field id="C_LNAME">Doe</field>
  <field id="C_ADDR1">123 Elm Street</field>
  <field id="C_ADDR2"/>
  <field id="C_CITY">Greenville</field>
  <field id="C_STATE">NC</field>
</data>

I need to copy the <field> nodes in SOURCE_DATA as children of the TARGET_DATA column's <data> column, but with a different "id" attribute value. For example, the SOURCE_DATA value shown above would need to look like this on the same row in TARGET_DATA:

<data>
  <field id="Q1">1684</field>
  <field id="Q2">John</field>
  <field id="Q3">Doe</field>
  <field id="Q4">123 Elm Street</field>
  <field id="Q5"/>
  <field id="Q6">Greenville</field>
  <field id="Q7">NC</field>
</data>

Edited to add: There is an external predefined mapping of field IDs in the SOURCE_DATA column to field IDs in the TARGET_DATA column, so one cannot assume the field IDs in the TARGET_DATA have an orderly ascending order. For example, the TARGET_DATA column could just as easily be this:

<data>
  <field id="Q43_1">1684</field>
  <field id="Q8">John</field>
  <field id="Q9">Doe</field>
  <field id="Q15_1">123 Elm Street</field>
  <field id="Q15_2"/>
  <field id="Q17_1">Greenville</field>
  <field id="Q17_A_1">NC</field>
</data>

Now sure, I could drag down a rowset to my C# client, manipulate the XML locally, and then perform a series of updates, but besides being bandwidth intensive I'm dealing with 100,000+ rows, so that would take a LONG time.

I've been banging my head against the wall trying to figure out how to do this server-side in one operation (or even a series of statements, which would probably be necessary since there is an external mapping of field IDs that has to be applied during the transfer) with some form of update-from-select syntax, but the SQL Server XML DML commands don't seem to want to deal with anything but string literals (or more likely I'm just not seeing how to do it).

Any suggestions on how to bend SQL Server 2008 to my will cheerfully and gratefully appreciated!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Try this:

declare @t table(SOURCE_DATA xml, TARGET_DATA xml)

insert @t values('<data>
  <field id="C_ID">1684</field>
  <field id="C_FNAME">John</field>
  <field id="C_LNAME">Doe</field>
  <field id="C_ADDR1">123 Elm Street</field>
  <field id="C_ADDR2"/>
  <field id="C_CITY">Greenville</field>
  <field id="C_STATE">NC</field>
</data>', null)


update @t
set TARGET_DATA = 
SOURCE_DATA.query('
<data>
{for $field in data/field
    return
        <field id="{concat("Q", xs:string(count(/data/field[. << $field]) + 1))}">
            {$field/text()}
        </field>
}       
</data>
')

select *
from @t

Output:

<data>
  <field id="Q1">1684</field>
  <field id="Q2">John</field>
  <field id="Q3">Doe</field>
  <field id="Q4">123 Elm Street</field>
  <field id="Q5" />
  <field id="Q6">Greenville</field>
  <field id="Q7">NC</field>
</data>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but unfortunately that won't work. I should have made it clear that there is an external predefined mapping of field IDs in the SOURCE_DATA column to field IDs in the TARGET_DATA column. The IDs in the TARGET_DATA column are not necessarily sequential in the numeric part as your solution assumes. I'll have to clarify that in my question. –  scottg Oct 22 '13 at 13:53
    
Your answer does, however, give me some ideas for how to attack this problem, so thanks! –  scottg Oct 22 '13 at 13:59
    
@scottg, it is not clear from your question what data contains TARGET_DATA column. Could you provide original SOURCE_DATA, original TARGET_DATA and final TARGET_DATA after update. –  Kirill Polishchuk Oct 22 '13 at 21:04

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