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Why combine "IN" with "OPERATOR <" brings better results than just "IN" clause alone?

I have a table for movements with millions of records, when i run the query with the "IN" clause alone takes several minutes to finish. But when I add "AND Product_ID < 400000" it just take seconds

Can anyone explain me why this happens?

(Product_ID has an index and the biggest Id number is less than 390000)

Slow code:

SELECT 
   Product_ID,
   Product_Name,
   Product_Cost
FROM Products
WHERE Product_ID IN (1,10,100,1000)
UNION
SELECT 
   Product_ID,
   Product_Name,
   Product_Cost
FROM Products_Hist
WHERE Product_ID IN (1,10,100,1000)

Fast Code:

SELECT 
   Product_ID,
   Product_Name,
   Product_Cost
FROM Products
WHERE Product_ID IN (1,10,100,1000)
      AND Product_ID < 400000
UNION
SELECT 
   Product_ID,
   Product_Name,
   Product_Cost
FROM Products_Hist
WHERE Product_ID IN (1,10,100,1000)
     AND Product_ID < 400000
share|improve this question
1  
Have you ruled out compiling time by running the slow query twice? –  Dan Bracuk Oct 21 '13 at 23:37
3  
Have you checked your query analyzer? –  hallie Oct 21 '13 at 23:38
    
Yes, each time I run the slow one takes several minutes and the other one just seconds. –  Michael Wallace Oct 22 '13 at 14:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The time difference lies in a full table scan versus an index range scan. Using the index removes large number of candidates first, before the IN caluse is applied to filter the result.

Do you know about using profilers like tkprof? or EXPLAIN PLAN? These will tell you ahead of time if your query is likely to run well or not.

Create two EXPLAIN PLAN runs, one for each query to see what is going on. If you do not know how to do do that we can help.

share|improve this answer
1  
Are you suggesting that Oracle cannot use an index against a simple IN clause? –  Larry Lustig Oct 22 '13 at 0:56
2  
No, he's suggesting you check the plan for both versions of the query. –  Jeffrey Kemp Oct 22 '13 at 3:42
    
@JeffreyKemp - yes. Thanks, I was not clear it appears. Changed answer. –  jim mcnamara Oct 22 '13 at 12:01
    
I used Explain Plan as you recommended. But I don't understand why the IN clause uses "Table Acces Full" and the "<" goes for a "Index Skip Scan" Why it does that? Can it be improved? –  Michael Wallace Oct 22 '13 at 14:41
    
Operators like NOT IN, IN, LIKE, NOT LIKE may turn off index use. It depends on lots of things - IN with a large number of choices often runs a full table scan. Not having current table statistics may also turn off index use. Oracle uses an optimizer with a lot of heuristics, sometimes to me, at least, these are not obvious. That is why EXPLAIN PLAN is a must for slow queries. Keep going until you find a way to get your correct resultset without a full table scan. See: oracle hints –  jim mcnamara Oct 22 '13 at 14:56

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