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I am having some trouble figuring out how to write my copy constructor...

This is my constructor:

public:
Person(const char * aName, const char * userID, const char * domain, Date aDate) {
//This constructor should create heap objects

    name = new char[strlen(aName) + 1]; 
    strcpy (name, aName);
    emailAddress = new EmailAddress(userID, domain); 
    birthday = new Date(aDate); 

    cout << "\nPerson(...) CREATING: ";
    printOn(cout);
}

This is what I am trying to do for my copy constructor:

Person(const Person & p){
    name = new char[strlen(p.name)+1];
    strcpy(name, p.name);
    emailAddress = new EmailAddress(*p.emailAddress);
    birthday = new Date(*p.date);

    cout << "\nPerson(const Person &) CREATING: ";
    printOn(cout);
}

I am unsure of what to pass in for my new Date and new EmailAddress in my copy constructor, what I am doing right now is not working at all!

This is my assignment operator for good measure (I don't know what to pass in for date and emailAddress again here...):

Person & operator=(const Person & p) {
        if(&p != this) {
           delete [] name;
           delete emailAddress;
           delete birthday;
           name = new char[strlen(p.name) + 1];
           strcpy (name, p.name);
               emailAddress = new EmailAddress();
               birthday = new Date();
        }
        return *this;
    }

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Edit:

Date definition

class Date{ //this class is complete
//This class represents a date

public:
      Date(int aDay, int aMonth, int aYear) : day(aDay), month(aMonth), year(aYear) {} 
      Date(const Date & aDate) :  day(aDate.day), month(aDate.month), year(aDate.year)     {};
      void printOn(ostream & out) const {out << day <<"/" << month << "/" << year;}    
share|improve this question
    
Unless you need custom logic in the copy constructor, you don't. The runtime does it for you –  Mgetz Oct 22 '13 at 0:14
    
I'm really just trying to learn how to write my own, but I'm stuck on how to do so –  Sarah Oct 22 '13 at 0:15
1  
Why do you have *p in your copy constructor for the date and emailAddress? Shouldn't it just be p.date (or p.birthdate) and p.emailAddress ? –  Peter K. Oct 22 '13 at 0:28
1  
@Sarah: I'd like to see the class definition itself, actually. Currently, I'm assuming that birthday is a Date * and a member, but then it should work when you call Date(*p.birthday). Since something is wrong, I'm poking around for the problem. –  Thanatos Oct 22 '13 at 0:31
1  
The first thing I would do is remove the need to call new. Unless you have a requirement that forces you to call new (subclasses etc), don't do it. Use std::string for strings. STL containers for lists, arrays, maps, etc. and let the library code deal with new. Once new is gone, your constructors become adapters between the initializer lists and operator= –  JimR Oct 22 '13 at 0:35

2 Answers 2

I'm going to break JimR's comment out into an answer, as it is good advice: Use C++ types, not C types, if possible. Also, avoid pointers if possible.

Using C++ Types

For example, your class, as best we can see it, looks like this:

class Person {
    char *name;
    Email *emailAddress;
    Date *birthday;
};

If Date and Email are lightweight enough (and they should be), keep them as values in the object itself; also, make name a std::string:

class Person {
    std::string name;
    Email emailAddress;
    Date birthday;
};

Your constructor becomes exceedingly trivial:

Person::Person(const std::string &aName, const std::string &userID, const std::string &domain, Date aDate) :
    name(aName),
    emailAddress(userID, domain),
    birthday(aDate)
{ }

Even better, the default copy constructor that C++ makes for you will now just work. So will the destructor, and the assignment operator. For free. Even better, all of these are now exception-safe: if, for whatever reason an exception gets raised, everything will get cleaned up.

share|improve this answer

I got it working - thank you everyone for helping me! I had to pass in *p.emailAddress, and *p.birthday

Person(const Person & p){
    name = new char[strlen(p.name)+1];
    strcpy(name, p.name);
    emailAddress = new EmailAddress(*p.emailAddress);
    birthday = new Date(*p.birthday);

    cout << "Person(const & Person)... CREATING: ";
    printOn(cout); 
}

Person & operator=(const Person & p) {
        if(&p != this) {
           delete [] name;
           delete emailAddress;
           delete birthday;
           name = new char[strlen(p.name) + 1];
           strcpy (name, p.name);
           emailAddress = new EmailAddress(*p.emailAddress);
           birthday = new Date(*p.birthday);
        }
        return *this;
    }
share|improve this answer

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