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My question arises from this answer. In the comments he mentions that I should delete the allocated dynamic 2D array in the reverse order. However I did not understand much why this should be done. Here is the code:

//intialising array
int size = 10000;
double **array = new double[size];
for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    array[i] = new double[size];

//conventional de-initialise
for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    delete[] array[i];
delete[] array;

//reverse de-initialise
for(int i = size - 1; size >= 0; i--)//notice reverse order here
    delete[] array[i];
delete[] array;

So my question is, is there any significant difference between the 2 methods of de-allocating a 2D array?

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1  
The C++ convention is to destruct objects in the reverse of the order the objects were constructed. But, this convention has little relevance to dynamically allocated objects, except where the objects depend on each other. –  jxh Oct 22 '13 at 3:28
    
No (but you really shouldn't do either one). –  Jerry Coffin Oct 22 '13 at 3:28
1  
@Jerry could you please tell me why you said that I shouldnt do either? –  Cool_Coder Oct 22 '13 at 3:32
1  
@Cool_Coder: Because what you usually want to do is use a 1D array (or a std::vector), then overload operator() to take two operands, and convert from row/column to a linear index into that array/vector. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 22 '13 at 3:59
2  
@Cool_Coder: My experience is that vector vs. array has no measurable effect on serious number crunching, and an array of pointers to arrays will be slower than either. The effect of caching can be quite significant here. The row arrays are non-contiguous, and you need to devote cache space to the array of pointers, but reducing its effectiveness. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 22 '13 at 4:49

1 Answer 1

In your example there's no difference - you create 100K pointers, and then allocate memory for each. It doesn't matter how you allocate/deallocate memory and assign it to pointers array.

However your question is about why reverse deallocation was in another post, and opposite to your example it matters - counter variable is reused to countdown from last allocated object down to 0, when new memory allocation failed. If deallocating other direction you'd need additional variable there:

try
{
    array = new double*[size];

    // Don't shadow counter here.
    for(counter = 0; counter < size; counter++)
    {
        array[counter] = new double[size];
    }
}
catch(std::bad_alloc)
{
    // delete in reverse order to mimic other containers.
    for(--counter; counter >= 0;--counter)
    {
        delete[] array[counter];
    }

    delete[] array;
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