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Kind of a weird question about iterators. While investigating a different question, I found the following. Here is an iterable that works:

class CacheGen(object):
    def __init__(self, iterable):
        if isinstance(iterable, (list, tuple, dict)):
            self._myiter = iterable
        else:
            self._myiter = list(iterable)
    def __iter__(self):
        return self._myiter.__iter__()
    def __contains__(self, key):
        return self._myiter.__contains__(key)
    def __getitem__(self, key):
        return self._myiter.__getitem__(key)

Here is a similar iterable that doesn't:

class CacheGen2(object):
    def __init__(self, iterable):
        if isinstance(iterable, (list, tuple, dict)):
            self._myiter = iterable
        else:
            self._myiter = list(iterable)
        self.__iter__ = self._myiter.__iter__
        self.__contains__ = self._myiter.__contains__
        self.__getitem__ = self._myiter.__getitem__

Note that they are really doing about the same thing, but one delegates, and the other just assigns my class constructor to the list's. Any ideas why? Note that it has an iter function in the class, I can call it directly and get a valid iterator, but the 'normal' functions don't work.

xr = xrange(100)
cg = CacheGen(xr)
list(cg)
[0,1,2,3...

cg2 = CacheGen2(xr)
list(cg2)
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-83-1f4da2c55acb> in <module>()
----> 1 list(cg2)

TypeError: 'CacheGen2' object is not iterable

cg2.__iter__
<method-wrapper '__iter__' of list object at 0x0000000006695C08>

cg2.__iter__()
<listiterator at 0x669c438>

iter(cg2)
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-86-b62853ce1dab> in <module>()
----> 1 iter(cg2)

TypeError: 'CacheGen2' object is not iterable
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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Magic methods like __iter__ are looked up on the class, not the instance, so it doesn't work to assign them on self. They have to actually exist on the class.

share|improve this answer
    
I have heard this. But, what's confusing me is, I can actually type cg2.__iter__() and it gives me a proper iterator; I can do list(cg2.__iter__()) and that gives me the correct data. but iter(cg2) fails. Is the internal path for determining what's iterable different from the direct function call? –  Corley Brigman Oct 22 '13 at 3:50
    
ok, update - yes, this looks to be the case. I added a line to the class, __iter__ = None, as a class variable above the init. cg2.__iter__() still returned a valid iterator, but the error message changed from saying it wasn't iterable, to saying `NoneType is not callable'. OK, i think i understand this now. –  Corley Brigman Oct 22 '13 at 3:54
1  
@CorleyBrigman: Right, you can call cg2.__iter__() yourself, but when you try to iterate over the object, it actually tries to call cg2.__class__.__iter__ (which doesn't exist). –  BrenBarn Oct 22 '13 at 3:56

The correct way of doing what you want is:

class CacheGen(object):

    def __init__(self, iterable):
        if isinstance(iterable, (list, tuple, dict)):
            self._myiter = iterable
        else:
            self._myiter = list(iterable)

    def __iter__(self):
        for value in self._myiter:
            yield value
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
curious... why is this better than just making self.__iter__ reflect self._myiter.__iter__? –  Corley Brigman Oct 22 '13 at 6:11
    
it's a bad idea monkey patching methods wo a serious reason. import this - "explicit is better then implicit" –  warvariuc Oct 22 '13 at 7:13
    
well, yeah, that explains why the above is better than self.__iter__ == self._myiter.__iter__. is the first version above(where it's delegated) considered monkey-patching? –  Corley Brigman Oct 22 '13 at 12:43
    
self.__iter__ = self._myiter.__iter__ is for sure monkey-patching. You are making some magic, which might difficult to understand and may be not needed at all. Version with def __iter__(self): return self._myiter.__iter__() is not monkey patching, but it can be written as def __iter__(self): return iter(self._myiter) which is the same as what i wrote. –  warvariuc Oct 22 '13 at 13:16
1  
the original case was specifically for optimization, so in this particular case, yes performance is important. it's similar but different enough to cause a 2x+ perf impact. i agree that in cases where performance isn't as important, clarity should win over small perf effects (small being up to the developer of course) –  Corley Brigman Oct 22 '13 at 13:42

If you would like to create your own Iterator class,

your class must override the following methods

def __iter__(self)

and

def next(self)

then only your class will be considered as an iterator

the simple example of iterator is,

class MyIter(object):
    def __init__(self, val):
        self.val = val

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def next(self):
        if self.val >= 5:
            raise StopIteration
        self.val += 1
        return self.val

print list(MyIter(0))
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