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I'd like to sort a vector so that the capital letters follow the lower case letter. If I have something like

This is a test
this is a test
Cats
cats
this thing

I would like the output to be

cats
Cats
this is a test
This is a test
this thing

The standard library sort will output

Cats
This is a test
cats
this is a test
this thing

I want to pass a predicate to std::sort so that it compares the lowercase version of the strings that I pass as arguments.

bool compare(std::string x, std::string y)
{
    return lowercase(x) < lowercase(y);
}

I tried lowering each character within the function and then making the comparison but it didn't work. I would like to test this approach by converting the string to lowercase by some other method. How do I convert strings into lowercase?

EDIT::

Actually I figured out the problem. This works. When I first wrote the function, instead of ref = tolower(ref) I had tolower(ref) without reassigning to ref so it wasn't doing anything.

bool compare(std::string x, std::string y)
{
    for(auto &ref:x)
        ref = tolower(ref);
    for(auto &ref:y)
        ref = tolower(ref);
    return x < y;
}

EDIT::

This code actually sorts with the capital letter first sometimes and the capital letter second in other times so it doesn't solve the problem completely.

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1  
I suppose you could use std::mismatch to find the first mismatching characters and then decide which one is less using std::islower and std::tolower. –  chris Oct 22 '13 at 4:48
2  
That won't sort the way you want it to, though. It will sort upper and lower case indiscriminately. The easiest solution is probably to use a locale-aware sort which has the order you want, for example: std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), std::locale("en_US.UTF-8")); (You need #include <locale>) –  rici Oct 22 '13 at 4:55
1  
I think your update will give you Cat,cats,This is a test,this is a test,this thing See here –  P0W Oct 22 '13 at 4:56
    
@P0W. Ya I went and tested it on several different strings and it sorted alphabetically but the capitals were sometimes in front and sometimes after. –  Zaphod Oct 22 '13 at 5:01
    
@Dochevsky: This is because you just told std::sort that lower-case and upper-case letters were identical, and thus it did not matter which was first or second :) I have a question regarding your example, it is strange that "this" < "This" < "this" (full circle!), and so I wonder whether it is your intent to have a comparison that depend on an arbitrary number of characters/words, or if you just want T to arrive after t, in which case the order should be cats, Cats, this is a test, this thing, This is a test. –  Matthieu M. Oct 22 '13 at 7:23

6 Answers 6

The usual way to do this would be to build a collation table. That's just a table giving the relative ordering of every character. In your case, you want each upper-case letter immediately following the corresponding lower-case letter.

We can do that something like this:

class comp_char { 
    std::vector<int> collation_table;
public:
    comp_char() : collation_table(std::numeric_limits<unsigned char>::max()) {
        std::iota(collation_table.begin(), collation_table.end(), 0);

        for (int i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
            collation_table['a' + i] = i * 2;
            collation_table['A' + i] = i * 2 + 1;
        }
    }

    bool operator()(unsigned char a, unsigned char b) {
        return collation_table[a] < collation_table[b];
    }
};

For the moment, I've ignored the (possibly knotty) problem of the relative ordering of letters to other characters. As it's written, everything else sorts before letters, but it would be pretty easy to change that so (for example) letters sorted before anything else instead. It probably doesn't make a huge difference either way though -- most people don't have strong expectations about whether 'a' < ';' or not.

In any case, once the collation table is built and usable, you want to use it to compare strings:

struct cmp_str {
    bool operator()(std::string const &a, std::string const &b) {
        comp_char cmp;
        size_t i = 0;
        while (a[i] == b[i] && i < a.size())
            ++i;
        return cmp(a[i], b[i]);
    }
};

...which we can use to do sorting, something like this:

int main(){
    std::vector<std::string> inputs {
        "This is a test",
        "this is a test",
        "Cats",
        "cats",
        "this thing"
    };

    std::sort(inputs.begin(), inputs.end(), cmp_str());
    std::copy(inputs.begin(), inputs.end(),
        std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));
}

For the moment, I've only written the collation table to handle the basic US-ASCII letters. For real use, you'd typically want to have things like letters with accents and such sort next to their corresponding un-accented equivalents. For that, you typically end up pre-building the table to (partially) match things like the Unicode specification for how things should be ordered.

Note that this output doesn't quite match what the original question says is desired, but I think in this case the question has a mistake. I can't see any way it would be even marginally reasonable to produce an order like:

this is a test
This is a test
this thing

This has "T" sorting both after and before "t", which doesn't seem to make sense (or at least doesn't fit with a lexical sort, which is what people nearly always want for strings).

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I like it, but if I'm not mistaken, you're missing an extra level of comparator, since the one passed to std::sort should take two strings. –  chris Oct 22 '13 at 5:11
    
@P0W: The output in your link is not the output the OP expects. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 22 '13 at 5:36
    
@BenjaminLindley ahh :( –  P0W Oct 22 '13 at 5:38
    
@BenjaminLindley: Yes, after re-reading the question, I realized I had it a bit wrong. I think I've corrected it now. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 22 '13 at 5:39
    
I think you're making the same mistake I made in my original answer. A simple character based lexicographical comparison is simply not sufficient. I think the OP is going for an order which you might find in a dictionary, which will consider t to be the same as T, unless the full words have exactly the same spelling, differing only in capitalization. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 22 '13 at 5:55

Your solution is almost there, you just need to make a special case if the lower case version of the strings are equal:

std::string to_lower(std::string s)
{
    for (auto & c : s)
        c = std::tolower(c);
    return s;
}

bool string_comp(std::string const & lhs, std::string const & rhs)
{

    auto lhs_lower = to_lower(lhs);
    auto rhs_lower = to_lower(rhs);
    if (lhs_lower == rhs_lower)
        return rhs < lhs;
    return lhs_lower < rhs_lower;
}

This could use some optimization. Copying the string is not necessary. You can, of course, do a case insensitive comparison in place. But that is feature is not conveniently available in the standard library, so I'll leave that exercise up to you.

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It gives same result yours here –  P0W Oct 22 '13 at 5:05
    
That's sort of fixed by changing rhs > lhs to lhs > rhs, but the actual order is like a case-insensitive sort, followed by this for adjacent equal elements. –  chris Oct 22 '13 at 5:06
    
@chris: I believe it's fixed now, I was completely off the mark before. A simple lexicographical comparison is not sufficient. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 22 '13 at 5:34

You need to do the comparison one char at a time, stopping at the first different char and then returning the result depending on the case conversion first, and on original char otherwise:

bool mylt(const std::string& a, const std::string& b) {
    int i=0, na=a.size(), nb=b.size();
    while (i<na && i<nb && a[i]==b[i]) i++;
    if (i==na || i==nb) return i<nb;
    char la=std::tolower(a[i]), lb=std::tolower(b[i]);
    return la<lb || (la==lb && a[i]<b[i]);
}

Warning: untested breakfast code

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Either use locals that already have the ordering you want, or write a character by character comparison function then use std::lexicographical_compare to turn it into a string comparison function.

I would try locals first, but if that proved frustrating the lexicographic is not horrible.

To compare chqracters, create two tuples or pairs of lower_case_letter, unchanged_letter, and call < on it. This will first order by lower case, then if that fails by the unchanged. I forget what order the upper vs lower will sort in: but if the order is backwards, just swap which lower case letter gets paired with which upper case letter, and you'll reverse the order!

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To be clear, I was aiming at the usual lexicographic type comparison but somehow make uppercase follow the lowercase if the strings were identical otherwise.

This requires a two-steps comparison then:

  1. compare the strings in case-insensitive mode
  2. if two strings are equal in case-insensitive mode, we want the reverse result of a case sensitive comparison (which puts upper-case first)

So, the comparator gives:

class Comparator {
public:
   bool operator()(std::string const& left, std::string const& right) {
       size_t const size = std::min(left.size(), right.size());

       // case-insensitive comparison
       for (size_t i = 0; i != size; ++i) {
           if (std::tolower(left[i]) < std::tolower(right[i])) { return true; }
       }

       if (left.size() != right.size()) { return size == left.size(); }

       // and now, case-sensitive (reversed)
       return right < left;
   }
}; // class Comparator
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The simplest solution is to use the collation-aware sorting provided by the standard locale object.

A locale's operator()(std::string, std::string) is exactly the locale's collation-aware comparison operator, so you can just insert it directly into your call to std::sort:

// Adjust to the locale you actually want to use
std::sort(strings.begin(), strings.end(), std::locale("en_US.UTF-8"));

Example on ideone

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