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I'm a very new to makefiles and i want to create directories using makefile. My project directory is like this

+--Project  
   +--output  
   +--source  
     +Testfile.cpp  
   +Makefile

I want to put all the objects and output into the respective output folder. I want to create folder structure which would be like this after compiling.

+--Project
   +--output
     +--debug (or release)
       +--objs
         +Testfile.o
       +Testfile (my executable file)
   +--source
     +Testfile.cpp
   +Makefile

I tried with several options, but could not succeed. Please help me to make directories using make file. I'm posting my Makefile for your consideration.

#---------------------------------------------------------------------
# Input dirs, names, files
#---------------------------------------------------------------------
OUTPUT_ROOT := output/

TITLE_NAME := TestProj 

ifdef DEBUG 
    TITLE_NAME += _DEBUG
else
ifdef RELEASE
    TITLE_NAME += _RELEASE
endif
endif


# Include all the source files here with the directory tree
SOURCES := \
    	source/TestFile.cpp \

#---------------------------------------------------------------------
# configs
#---------------------------------------------------------------------
ifdef DEBUG
OUT_DIR 	:= $(OUTPUT_ROOT)debug
CC_FLAGS    := -c -Wall
else
ifdef RELEASE
OUT_DIR 	:= $(OUTPUT_ROOT)release
CC_FLAGS    := -c -Wall
else
$(error no build type defined)
endif
endif

# Put objects in the output directory.
OUT_O_DIR   := $(OUT_DIR)/objs

#---------------------------------------------------------------------
# settings
#---------------------------------------------------------------------
OBJS = $(SOURCES:.cpp=.o)
DIRS = $(subst /,/,$(sort $(dir $(OBJS))))
DIR_TARGET = $(OUT_DIR)

OUTPUT_TARGET = $(OUT_DIR)/$(TITLE_NAME)

CC_FLAGS +=   

LCF_FLAGS := 

LD_FLAGS := 

#---------------------------------------------------------------------
# executables
#---------------------------------------------------------------------
MD := mkdir
RM := rm
CC := g++

#---------------------------------------------------------------------
# rules
#---------------------------------------------------------------------
.PHONY: all clean title 

all: title 

clean:
    $(RM) -rf $(OUT_DIR)

$(DIR_TARGET):
    $(MD) -p $(DIRS)

.cpp.o: 
    @$(CC) -c $< -o $@

$(OBJS): $(OUT_O_DIR)/%.o: %.cpp
    @$(CC) -c $< -o $@

title: $(DIR_TARGET) $(OBJS)

Thanks in advance. Please guide me if i made any mistakes also.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

This would do it - assuming a Unix-like environment.

MKDIR_P = mkdir -p

.PHONY: directories

all: directories program

directories: ${OUT_DIR}

${OUT_DIR}:
        ${MKDIR_P} ${OUT_DIR}

This would have to be run in the top-level directory - or the definition of ${OUT_DIR} would have to be correct relative to where it is run. Of course, if you follow the edicts of Peter Miller's "Recursive Make Considered Harmful" paper, then you'll be running make in the top-level directory anyway.

I'm playing with this (RMCH) at the moment. It needed a bit of adaptation to the suite of software that I am using as a test ground. The suite has a dozen separate programs built with source spread across 15 directories, some of it shared. But with a bit of care, it can be done. OTOH, it might not be appropriate for a newbie.


As noted in the comments, listing the 'mkdir' command as the action for 'directories' is wrong. As also noted in the comments, there are other ways to fix the 'do not know how to make output/debug' error that results. One is to remove the dependency on the the 'directories' line. This works because 'mkdir -p' does not generate errors if all the directories it is asked to create already exist. The other is the mechanism shown, which will only attempt to create the directory if it does not exist. The 'as amended' version is what I had in mind last night - but both techniques work (and both have problems if output/debug exists but is a file rather than a directory).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Jonathan. when i tried that i got an error "make: *** No rule to make target output/debug', needed by directories'. Stop." But i'm not going to worry about that now. will stick with the basic rules. :). Thank you for guiding. And i'm running "make" from toplevel directory only. –  Jabez Dec 23 '09 at 6:49
    
Just delete the ${OUT_DIR} behind directories:, then it should work. –  Doc Brown Dec 23 '09 at 7:02
    
It worked. Thank you Doc. –  Jabez Dec 23 '09 at 8:41
    
Implementing this requires that you catch every possible case where you use the directories from the command-line though. Furthermore, you can't make any file generating build rules dependant on directories without causing them to always rebuild.. –  mtalexan Dec 30 '13 at 18:30

In my opinion, directories should not be considered targets of your makefile, either in technical or in design sense. You should create files and if a file creation needs a new directory then quietly create the directory within the rule for the relevant file.

If you're targeting a usual or "patterned" file, just use make's internal variable $(@D), that means "the directory the current target resides in" (cmp. with $@ for the target). For example,

$(OUT_O_DIR)/%.o: %.cpp
        @mkdir -p $(@D)
        @$(CC) -c $< -o $@

title: $(OBJS)

Then, you're effectively do the same: create directories for all $(OBJS), but you'll to it in less complicated way.

The same policy (files are targets, directories never are) is used in various applications. For example, git revision control system doesn't store directories.


Note: If you're going to use it, it might be useful to introduce a convenience variable and utilize make's expansion rules.

dir_guard=@mkdir -p $(@D)

$(OUT_O_DIR)/%.o: %.cpp
        $(dir_guard)
        @$(CC) -c $< -o $@

$(OUT_O_DIR_DEBUG)/%.o: %.cpp
        $(dir_guard)
        @$(CC) -g -c $< -o $@

title: $(OBJS)
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1  
While linking the directory requirement to files is a better option in my opinion, your solution also has the significant drawback that the mkdir process will be called by the make file for every single file that's rebuilt, most of which won't need to make the directory again. When adapted to non-Linux build systems like Windows, it actually causes both an unblockable error output since there is no -p equivalent to the mkdir command, and more importantly a gigantic amount of overhead since the shell invocation is not minimally invasive. –  mtalexan Dec 30 '13 at 18:27

I've just come up with a fairly reasonable solution that lets you define the files to build and have directories be automatically created. First, define a variable ALL_TARGET_FILES that holds the file name of every file that your makefile will be build. Then use the following code:

define depend_on_dir
$(1): | $(dir $(1))

ifndef $(dir $(1))_DIRECTORY_RULE_IS_DEFINED
$(dir $(1)):
    mkdir -p $$@

$(dir $(1))_DIRECTORY_RULE_IS_DEFINED := 1
endif
endef

$(foreach file,$(ALL_TARGET_FILES),$(eval $(call depend_on_dir,$(file))))

Here's how it works. I define a function depend_on_dir which takes a file name and generates a rule that makes the file depend on the directory that contains it and then defines a rule to create that directory if necessary. Then I use foreach to call this function on each file name and eval the result.

Note that you'll need a version of GNU make that supports eval, which I think is versions 3.81 and higher.

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given that you're a newbie, I'd say don't try to do this yet. it's definitely possible, but will needlessly complicate your Makefile. stick to the simple ways until you're more comfortable with make.

that said, one way to build in a directory different from the source directory is VPATH; i prefer pattern rules

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Thank you. Will stick to the basic rules. –  Jabez Dec 23 '09 at 6:49

Unless you have some external requirement that forces you to use makefiles, I'd suggest that you use CMake instead. CMake is a tool which generates makefiles (or Visual Studio projects files, or a number of other types of output) from a simple description file.

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