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I believe the answer to my question is "Not Available" but I would rather ask it because if I can not find it, it doesn't necessary mean that it doesn't exists!

Using Json.Net, I have properties in my objects which need special care in order to serialize / deserialize them. Making a descendant of JsonConverter, I managed to accomplish this successfully. This is the common way of doing this:

public class SomeConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        ...
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        ...
    }

    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        ...
    }
}

class SomeClass
{
    [JsonProperty, JsonConverter(typeof(SomeConverter))]
    public SomeType SomeProperty;
}

//Later on, in code somewhere
SomeClass SomeObject = new SomeClass();
string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(SomeObject, new SomeConverter());

My problem with this code is that I need to introduce my custom converter in every serialization / deserialization. In my project there are so many cases that I can not do that. For instance, I'm using other external projects which they make use of Json.Net as well and they will be working on my SomeClass instances but since I don't want to/can't make change in their codes, I have no way to introduce my converter.

Is there any way I can register my converter, using some static member perhaps, in Json.Net so no matter where serialization / deserialization happens, my converter is always present?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes, this is possible using Json.Net 5.0.5 or later. See JsonConvert.DefaultSettings.

JsonConvert.DefaultSettings = () => new JsonSerializerSettings
{
    Converters = new List<JsonConverter> { new SomeConverter() }
};

// Later on...
string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(someObject);  // this will use SomeConverter
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Thanks a million, you made my day :) –  Mehran Oct 22 '13 at 8:56
    
I get an error in asp.net web api if I do this in the App_Start() event. Says Method not found: 'Void Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.set_DefaultSettings –  Donny V. Dec 27 '13 at 21:56
    
In Web API, try this instead: GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Formatters.JsonFormatter.SerializerSettings.C‌​onverters.Add(new SomeConverter()); –  Brian Rogers Dec 28 '13 at 0:24

Another approach (which wins in priority over the one @Brian mentions above) is to implement a custom contract resolver

JsonFormatter.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver = new CustomContractResolver();

And the implementation is rather straightforward

public class CustomContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    private static readonly JsonConverter _converter = new MyCustomConverter();
    private static Type _type = typeof (MyCustomType);

    protected override JsonConverter ResolveContractConverter(Type objectType)
    {
        if (objectType == null || !_type.IsAssignableFrom(objectType)) // alternatively _type == objectType
        {
            return base.ResolveContractConverter(objectType);
        }

        return _converter;
    }
}

Both methods are valid, this one is just a bigger hammer

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