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I have a simple page with a form and a button outside the form. I am trying to validate the form on the button click. I have added the rules for validation of the form on the document.onready function. However the form is not getting validated.

HTML

<form id="form1" method="post" action="">
  <div>
    <input name="Name" id="name1" data-errorclass="error-name"/>
  </div>
  <input type="submit" id="name_id" value="Save"/>
</form>

JS

$(document).ready(function () {
   $("#name_id").click(function() {
     alert("called");
     $('.form1').validate({
       rules: {
        'Name' : {
            required: true
         }

       },
       messages: {
        'Name' : {
            required: 'Name is  required'
         }
       },
       errorClass: 'error-name',
       errorPlacement: function(err, element) {
        err.insertBefore(element);
        },        
     });
   });
});

fiddle

share|improve this question
    
did you try doing $('#form1').submit(function() {....}); –  Barry Chapman Oct 22 '13 at 7:03
    
instead of $("#name_id").click(function() { –  Barry Chapman Oct 22 '13 at 7:04
    
@BarryChapman - yes –  Joe Oct 22 '13 at 7:04
    
By fixing the code in your question, the answer no longer makes any sense. I rolled it back so that readers can understand why the accepted answer works. –  Sparky Oct 22 '13 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As already stated, the original code was targeting a class, .form1, while the actual form contained id="form1". Fixing the selector to target the id will quickly solve this.

$('#form1`).validate({...

Despite an answer already being posted, I feel the need to also post some important notes regarding some common misconceptions about this plugin.

The .validate() method is only used for plugin initialization, not a method for testing the validity. So putting .validate() inside a click handler makes no sense. .validate() only needs to be called one time, so being called repeatedly upon every click is redundant and unnecessary.

As long as the submit button is inside the <form> tags, there is no need for a click handler as this is automatically captured by the plugin. See: http://jsfiddle.net/B5mVh/6/

If the button is outside of the <form>, you can use the .valid() method to test the form's validity.

$(document).ready(function () {

    $('#form1').validate({  // <-- INITIALIZE plugin on your form
        // your rules & options      
    });

    // For button OUTSIDE of form tags
    $("#name_id").click(function() {
        if ($('#form1').valid()) {
            alert("form is valid");
        } else {
            alert("form is invalid");
        }
    });

});

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/B5mVh/4/

However, in your original code, the button is inside the form, so as explained before, there's no need for a click handler at all. But if you want to run some code upon the click event, use the submitHandler (when valid) and invalidHandler (when invalid) callback functions.

$(document).ready(function () {

    $('#form1').validate({  // <-- INITIALIZE plugin on your form
        // your rules & options,
        submitHandler: function(form) {
             alert("form is valid");
             return false;
        },
        invalidHandler: function() {
            alert("form is invalid");
        }
    });

});

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/B5mVh/5/

Of course, you don't have to use these optional callback functions. The plugin works perfectly fine without them as shown before:

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/B5mVh/6/

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you very much –  Joe Oct 23 '13 at 11:28

In jQuery's validate() function you call it on a form with the class .form1, you should name this correctly to the corresponding ID #form1.

This should solve your issue.

share|improve this answer
2  
good catch - +1 –  Barry Chapman Oct 22 '13 at 7:05
    
@Sidney Liebrand -No its impossible. If I added like that it would affect other functionalities. –  Joe Oct 22 '13 at 7:06
1  
It's always abit messy working with ID's and classes a common mistake that also happened to me plenty of times :) –  Sidney Liebrand Oct 22 '13 at 7:06
1  
Sam: How is it impossible? you are targeting a nonexistent class –  Barry Chapman Oct 22 '13 at 7:06
    
An ID should be unique, if you have multiple same ID's you should change this to a class, otherwise rename your ID to something unique. –  Sidney Liebrand Oct 22 '13 at 7:07

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