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Why does scipy.signal.detrend give slightly different results on the same data? Also, it seems to give different results depending on whether the keyword "linear" is included (by default, the detrend is linear anyway)

Edit: I know the inaccuracy is very small, and some inaccuracy is expected due to floating point arithmetic. What is strange is that the results are different for the same data + function.

from scipy.signal import detrend as scipy_detrend
from pylab import *

x = arange(10)
y = arange(10, dtype='int64')

subplot(211)
plot(x, scipy_detrend(y, type="linear"), label='scipy detrend linear')
plot(x, scipy_detrend(y), label='scipy detrend')
plot(x, detrend(y, "linear"), label='pylab detrend')

subplot(212)
plot(x, scipy_detrend(y, type="linear"), label='scipy detrend linear')
plot(x, scipy_detrend(y), label='scipy detrend')
plot(x, detrend(y, "linear"), label='pylab detrend')

show()

Note: the red line is pylab.detrend, blue line is scipy.signal.detrend with linear keyword and green is just scipy.signal.detrend enter image description here.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is floating point rounding error. In the general case, floating point error is not necessarily reproducible across runs on the same CPU, same data, and same code, as it can be affected by events outside the program (unless special care is taken):

Consistency of Floating-Point Results using the Intel® Compiler or Why doesn’t my application always give the same answer? - Dr. Martyn J. Corden, David Kreitzer

This seems to be a FAQ

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1  
Thanks for looking into this! I can not access the document you linked to (Page not found). – Dhara Oct 22 '13 at 10:48
    
Fixed the link. – pv. Oct 22 '13 at 13:13

Your data is arange(10), and your detrended result is of the order 1e-15, that means the difference is due to floating point accuracy. (Your detrended result is 15 orders of magnitude smaller than your input already)

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If it were floating point accuracy, you would always see the same inaccuracy, not different numbers in different runs, right? – Dhara Oct 22 '13 at 8:28
    
@Dhara No, you would see different numbers in different runs, depending on how float(1) actually is 1.00000000004 or 1.00000000007 or ... – usethedeathstar Oct 22 '13 at 8:49
    
Are you suggesting that at the start of the program, float(x) can have different representations? Can you back up that claim? I can understand if different arithmetic operations lead to slightly different values for float(x), but if I simply do float(x), it should always be the exact same binary representation. – Dhara Oct 22 '13 at 9:01
    
hmm, point taken, that sounded confusing, but do you have different runs? Since one run with keyword linear and one run without it is not two runs of the same thing, since the things it does internally will be slightly different – usethedeathstar Oct 22 '13 at 9:06
    
by default, the detrend should do a linear detrend, so the keyword shouldn't matter at all – Dhara Oct 22 '13 at 9:14

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