Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I learned that I should unlock reverse order to lock order. For example.

A.lock(); B.lock(); B.unlock(); A.unlock();

But, what happen if I did like this : A.lock(); B.lock(); A.unlock(); B.unlock();

I try to make a deadlock scenario, but if I always lock A earlier then B, then I don't know how deadlock would happen. Would you help me?

share|improve this question
    
Are you talking about a case where there are multiple processes holding locks or are you just dealing with a single process ? –  Mahesh Velaga Dec 23 '09 at 8:06
    
multiple processes, of course. –  P-P Dec 23 '09 at 8:12
2  
Not "of course", why multiple processes? Applies just as well to threads within a single process. –  djna Dec 23 '09 at 8:20
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Lock ordering just means that you prevent deadlocks by obtaining locks in a fixed order, and do not obtain locks again after you start unlocking.

I do not think the order of unlocks makes any difference here (in fact, it should be beneficial to release a lock as soon as possible, even if out of order)

share|improve this answer
add comment

In the simple case given, unlocking in the reverse order is not necessary to avoid a deadlock (as the other answers have noted).

It is, however, good style. As the code gets more complicated, unlocking in the reverse order helps you maintain proper lock ordering.

Consider:

A.lock();
B.lock();
Foo();
A.unlock();
Bar();
B.unlock();

If Bar() attempts to reacquire A, you've effectively broken your lock ordering. You're holding B and then trying to get A.

If you unlock in the reverse order style (which is very natural if you use RAII):

A.lock();
B.lock();
Foo();
B.unlock();
Bar();
A.unlock();

then it doesn't matter if Bar() attempts to take a lock, as lock ordering will be preserved.

share|improve this answer
add comment

And for Java, unlocking is in the reverse order if synchronized keyword is used for locking. There is no way to unlock in a different order for using synchronized keyword.

synchronized(a) {
  synchronized(b) {
    // statements
  }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The order of unlock will not affect how prone your system is to deadlock, however there's one reasons to think about the order of unlock:

In order to avoid deadlocks you must make sure that your lock/unlocks are paired, in that you never miss an unlock. As a stylistic approach, by conspicuosly having blocks of code that are responsible for a particualr lock it's much easier to visually identifiy that locks and unlocks are paired. The end-effect is that clearly correct code will probably take and release the locks as you describe.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I do not think deadlock would happen here. The general deadlock concept is one thread waits for some resource locked by other thread, while other thread needs resource locked by first thread to finish and release resource needed by first.

Further reading

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your example isn't going to deadlock with itself ever. Unlocking in reverse order isn't important, it's locking in a consistent order. This will dead lock, even though unlocks are in reverse order

Thread 1

A.lock();
B.lock();
B.unlock();
A.unlock();

Thread 2

B.lock();
A.lock();
A.unlock();
B.unlock();
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.