Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to change my objects material colour at run time based on if a ray I'm casting hits a certain object. When I quit my program I'm then wanting it to change back to its original material colour.

My menu with the material I want to switch between has a highlight function which lets the user know the material they are about to select. During the last few days I've been trying to get this to work I've had the following issues:

  • an instance of my desired material colour is attached to the gameobject but doesn't change the rendered material

  • the highlight material colour is placed on my game object as opposed to the actual material I want

I've ran out of ideas on how to fix this and I've gotten tunnel vision on this where I need a fresh pair of eyes to look over what I have so far.

Has anyone ever done this before? Could you please tell me what it is I'm doing wrong?

This is the current state of the code I have been working with:

My class storing the original material so that it can switch back to it once the program ends.

    public GameObject targetMaterial;
public Color orignalMaterial;

//store GO original colour
void Awake()
{
    orignalMaterial = targetMaterial.renderer.material.color;
}

//highlight code
public void ChangeObjectMaterialColour(Color materialColour)
{
    targetMaterial.renderer.material.color = materialColour;        
}

//
void OnApplicationQuit()
{
    targetMaterial.renderer.material.color = orignalMaterial;
}

How I'm trying to change the material colours, I have three different options I want to switch between:

ChangeObjectColour new_colour1;
ChangeObjectColour new_colour2;
ChangeObjectColour new_colour3;

void Start () 
{
    new_colour1 = GameObject.Find("Colour 1").GetComponent<ChangeObjectColour>();
    new_colour2 = GameObject.Find("Colour 2").GetComponent<ChangeObjectColour>();
    new_colour3 = GameObject.Find("Colour 3").GetComponent<ChangeObjectColour>();
}


 void CastRay()
{
     if (Physics.Raycast(transform.position, fwd, out hit))
        {
            foreach(string t in _tags)
            {
                if(hit.collider.gameObject.tag == t)
                {
                    HighLight(hit.collider.gameObject);
                    hitTaggedObject = true;
                }                   
            }

            if(hit.collider.gameObject.tag == "Colour1")
            {       new_colour1.ChangeObjectMaterialColour(hit.collider.gameObject.renderer.material.color);
            }

            if(hit.collider.gameObject.tag == "Colour2")
            {       new_colour2.ChangeObjectMaterialColour(hit.collider.gameObject.renderer.material.color);
            }               
            if(hit.collider.gameObject.tag == "Colour3")
                {
   new_colour3.ChangeObjectMaterialColour(hit.collider.gameObject.renderer.material.color);
                }
        }

Can anyone see anything I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I think part of the problem is the way that your accessing the material properties. Here are two extension methods that change the color and material "Not permanently" Also you dont have to change the color back when the applications quits. It will revert back to its original state automatically on exit.

/// <summary>
/// Changes the material attached to the gameObject
/// </summary>
public static void ChangeMaterial(this GameObject go, Material mat)
{
    go.renderer.material = mat;
}

/// <summary>
/// Changes the color of the material
/// </summary>
public static void ChangeColor(this Material mat, Color color)
{
    mat.SetColor("_Color", color);              
}

Ive used these methods hundreds of times in a single runtime session. Put them in a static class and call it like its a member of its extended class.

For example:

gameObject.renderer.material.ChangeColor(Color.red);
gameObject.ChangeMaterial( /* Your Material */ );

The "_Color" is the name of the color component defined inside of the shader. All of unitys built in shaders have this property. But if you have a custom shader this might not be the case and it could be called something else. Unfortuantly there is no way to programmatically know this, you just have to keep track.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.