Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Java, why can not I inherit from Interfaces?

If the case is that the interfaces do no provide the implementation of the methods, then how are we able to inherit from Abstract Classes.

share|improve this question
2  
Your premise is wrong. You can inherit from an interface. You just can't currently inherit implementations from interfaces, but that has everything to do with the fact that interfaces have no implementations for you to inherit. –  Mark Peters Oct 22 '13 at 13:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Simply put, you cannot inherit from interfaces, because interfaces provide only abstraction, not functionality.

Notes from the comments below (thanks to @Mark Peters and @qqilihq) :

  • Interfaces can inherit from interfaces
  • Both abstract classes and interfaces are forms of inheritance, but currently only abstract classes support code inheritance. Interfaces provide type inheritance. In Java 8, interfaces will provide code inheritance as well.

You can also check the Official Java Tutorials, it's a good starting point for Java knowledge.

share|improve this answer
1  
Simple and accurate, right to the point like this comment :) –  Maroun Maroun Oct 22 '13 at 13:13
1  
Wait for Java 8. I would say both are forms of inheritance, but currently only abstract classes support implementation inheritance. Interfaces provide type inheritance. In Java 8, interfaces will provide code inheritance as well. –  Mark Peters Oct 22 '13 at 13:14
2  
[addition] Interfaces can inherit from interfaces. –  qqilihq Oct 22 '13 at 13:14
    
@MarkPeters, thank you. I will add your note to the answer. –  kocko Oct 22 '13 at 13:16
    
Also good to note that you can inherit as many interfaces as you want but only a single abstract class –  inquisitiveIdiot Oct 22 '13 at 13:19

This is because abstract classes and interfaces are inherently different types of objects. Abstract classes define functionality while inheritances act as a framework.

EDIT: As I posted above you can inherit as many interfaces as you want but only a single abstract class

share|improve this answer

Java supports only single inheritance via the EXTENDS keyword. The idea is that you can "inherit" from multiple interfaces in the same class.

Therefor the IMPLEMENTS keyword is used to "inherit" an interface.

A class that IMPLEMENTS an interface gains access to all declarations in the interface.

share|improve this answer

As a matter of fact you can inherit from interfaces - but only to extend their interface.

You can create abstract classes that do some or all of the work required by an interface.

You can then extend your abstract classes to make real classes. Even overriding functionality from the abstract class if you wish.

// close
interface Closeable {
  public void close();

}

// open and close
interface Openable extends Closeable {
  public void open();

}

// Simplistic implementation
abstract class AbstractCloseable implements Closeable {

  @Override
  public void close() {
    System.out.println(this.getClass().getSimpleName() + "-close");
  }

}

// Simplistic implementation
abstract class AbstractOpenable extends AbstractCloseable implements Openable {
  boolean open = false;

  @Override
  public void open() {
    System.out.println(this.getClass().getSimpleName() + "-open");
    open = true;
  }

  @Override
  public void close() {
    super.close();
    open = false;
  }

}

class PortHole extends AbstractOpenable implements Openable {

  public void clean() {
    if (!open) {
      System.out.println(this.getClass().getSimpleName() + "-clean");
    } else {
      System.out.println(this.getClass().getSimpleName() + "-fall out");

    }
  }

}

public void test() {
  System.out.println("Hello");
  PortHole p = new PortHole();
  p.open();
  p.clean();
  p.close();
  p.clean();
}

Prints:

PortHole-open
PortHole-fall out
PortHole-close
PortHole-clean
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.