Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know this has been discussed in this topic: In Firebug 1.6.0, how do you tell what url triggered a 404 error?, but I'm thinking my situation is a little bit different. When I look at the net tab it shows the GET is referring to the 404 Not Found page. Here's a screenshot:

http://www.fsclive.com/images/FirebugGrab.jpg

The odd thing is if you go to this page, it works just fine and there is no issue accessing this page. I'm wondering if it's pointing to the 404 Not Found page only after it can't access whatever script or object that it's trying to access to begin with.

So my main questions are what could be causing this and how can I tell what the original request was that may have redirected to the 404 page after not being able to find it?

Thanks for any help/ideas!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

how can I tell what the original request was

Firebug is currently not able to display the initiator of a network request, because Firefox doesn't provide the necessary API yet. See issue 1772 and the corresponding Mozilla bug 563623 for more info on this.

You can disable the redirection to the custom 404 page in your development environment, so the original URL is displayed within the Net panel.

what could be causing this

Checking with Web Inspector showed that on the home page of davincilabs.com I get a 404 error for "http://www.davincilabs.com/davincicon/themes/DV_form_modern_black/galleria/galleria-1.2.6.min.js".

Sebastian

share|improve this answer
    
Just tried that and found that it worked great! Thanks for your help! I knew it was something minute that was causing it, but the knowledge of how to better use not only Firebug but the built in Web Inspector helps significantly. –  Jon Gallup Oct 24 '13 at 18:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.