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Some time ago I asked a question about creating market basket data. Now I would like to create a similair data.frame, but based on a third variable. Unfortunately I run into problems trying. Previous question: Effecient way to create market basket matrix in R
@shadow and @SimonO101 gave me good answers, but I was not able to alter their anwser correctly. I have the following data:

Customer <- as.factor(c(1000001,1000001,1000001,1000001,1000001,1000001,1000002,1000002,1000002,1000003,1000003,1000003))
Product <- as.factor(c(100001,100001,100001,100004,100004,100002,100003,100003,100003,100002,100003,100008))
input <- data.frame(Customer,Product)

I can create a contingency table now the following way:

input_df <- as.data.frame.matrix(table(input))

However I have a third (numeric) variable which I want as output in the table.

Number <- c(3,1,-4,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1) 
input <- data.frame(Customer,Product,Number)

Now the code (of course, now there are 3 variables) does not work anymore. The result I am looking for has unique Customer as row names and unique Product as column names. And has Number as value (or 0 if not present), this number could be calculated by:

input_agg <- aggregate( Number ~ Customer + Product, data = input, sum)

Hope my question is clear, please comment if something is not clear.

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+1 for another reproducible example. –  Simon O'Hanlon Oct 22 '13 at 14:33
    
Are you able to complete the aggregate step successfully? –  Ananda Mahto Oct 22 '13 at 17:36
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use xtabs for that :

R> xtabs(Number~Customer+Product, data=input)

         Product
Customer  100001 100002 100003 100004 100008
  1000001      0      1      0      2      0
  1000002      0      0      3      0      0
  1000003      0      1      1      0      1
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I always forget xtabs. Good answer, –  Simon O'Hanlon Oct 22 '13 at 14:31
    
@SimonO101 In fact, I just discovered it :-) –  juba Oct 22 '13 at 14:31
    
I think it's not a question of efficiency but of how much RAM you have on your system. Whatever method you use to compute it, you will always end up with a 90000x2000 table to store in memory... –  juba Oct 22 '13 at 15:09
    
@juba, That is correct indeed, should had known that it wouldn't fit. –  Freddy Oct 22 '13 at 15:18
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This class of problem is designed for reshape2::dcast...

require( reshape2 )
#  Too many rows so change to a data.table.
dcast( input , Customer ~ Product , fun = sum , value.var = "Number" )
#  Customer 100001 100002 100003 100004 100008
#1  1000001      0      1      0      2      0
#2  1000002      0      0      3      0      0
#3  1000003      0      1      1      0      1

Recently, the method for using dcast with data.table object was implemented by @Arun responding to FR #2627. Great stuff. You will have to use the development version 1.8.11. Also at the moment, it should be used as dcast.data.table. This is because dcast is not a S3 generic yet in reshape2 package. That is, you can do:

require(reshape2)
require(data.table)
input <- data.table(input)   
dcast.data.table(input , Customer ~ Product , fun = sum , value.var = "Number")
#    Customer 100001 100002 100003 100004 100008
# 1:  1000001      0      1      0      2      0
# 2:  1000002      0      0      3      0      0
# 3:  1000003      0      1      1      0      1

This should work quite well on bigger data and should be much faster than reshape2:::dcast as well.


Alternatively, you can try the reshape:::cast version which may or may not crash... Try it!!

require(reshape)
input <- data.table( input )
cast( input , Customer ~ Product , fun = sum , value = .(Number) )
share|improve this answer
    
Fast respons, this works indeed. However it makes my R session crash instandly. I updated my question. –  Freddy Oct 22 '13 at 14:49
    
@Freddy see update. Use a data.table. dcast methods have been written for these. Should be fast and avoid crashing your computer! –  Simon O'Hanlon Oct 22 '13 at 14:54
    
@Freddy but with a data.table rather than a data.frame? That is an important difference! Also, if you don't assign the output to a variable it will try to print to console and it will probably crash, so try and copy/paste this... input <- data.table( input ); output <- dcast( input , Customer ~ Product , fun = sum , value.var = "Number" ) –  Simon O'Hanlon Oct 22 '13 at 15:05
    
Hmmmm, why don't you try with a subset of the data, e.g. the first 100k rows? e.g. dcast( input[ 1:1e5 , ] ... ) see if that works and build up from there? –  Simon O'Hanlon Oct 22 '13 at 15:10
    
@Freddy perhaps you are seeing this problem... too many groups. –  Simon O'Hanlon Oct 22 '13 at 15:19
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