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What is the best way to find all combinations of items in an array in c#?

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do you mean "unique items in the array" or "all the different ways of ordering the items in your array"? –  Richard H Dec 23 '09 at 11:27
    
All the different ways of ordering the items in the array. –  Bravax Dec 23 '09 at 11:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is O(n!)

static List<List<int>> comb;
        static bool []used;
        static void GetCombinationSample()
        {
            int[] arr = { 10, 50, 3, 1, 2 };
            used = new bool[arr.Length];
            used.Fill(false);
            comb = new List<List<int>>();
            List<int> c = new List<int>();
            GetComb(arr, 0, c);
            foreach (var item in comb)
            {
                foreach (var x in item)
                {
                    Console.Write(x + ",");
                }
                Console.WriteLine("");
            }
        }
        static void GetComb(int[] arr, int colindex, List<int> c)
        {

            if (colindex >= arr.Length)
            {
                comb.Add(new List<int>(c));
                return;
            }
            for (int i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++)
            {
                if (!used[i])
                {
                    used[i] = true;
                    c.Add(arr[i]);
                    GetComb(arr, colindex + 1, c);
                    c.RemoveAt(c.Count - 1);
                    used[i] = false;
                }
            }
        }
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UPDATED

Here are a set of generic functions (require .net 3.5 or higher) for different scenarios. The outputs are for a list of {1, 2, 3, 4} and a length of 2.

Permutations with repetition

static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> 
    GetPermutationsWithRept<T>(IEnumerable<T> list, int length)
{
    if (length == 1) return list.Select(t => new T[] { t });
    return GetPermutationsWithRept(list, length - 1)
        .SelectMany(t => list, 
            (t1, t2) => t1.Concat(new T[] { t2 }));
}

Output:

{1,1} {1,2} {1,3} {1,4} {2,1} {2,2} {2,3} {2,4} {3,1} {3,2} {3,3} {3,4} {4,1} {4,2} {4,3} {4,4}

Permutations

static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>
    GetPermutations<T>(IEnumerable<T> list, int length)
{
    if (length == 1) return list.Select(t => new T[] { t });
    return GetPermutations(list, length - 1)
        .SelectMany(t => list.Where(o => !t.Contains(o)),
            (t1, t2) => t1.Concat(new T[] { t2 }));
}

Output:

{1,2} {1,3} {1,4} {2,1} {2,3} {2,4} {3,1} {3,2} {3,4} {4,1} {4,2} {4,3}

K-combinations with repetition

static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> 
    GetKCombsWithRept<T>(IEnumerable<T> list, int length) where T : IComparable
{
    if (length == 1) return list.Select(t => new T[] { t });
    return GetKCombsWithRept(list, length - 1)
        .SelectMany(t => list.Where(o => o.CompareTo(t.Last()) >= 0), 
            (t1, t2) => t1.Concat(new T[] { t2 }));
}

Output:

{1,1} {1,2} {1,3} {1,4} {2,2} {2,3} {2,4} {3,3} {3,4} {4,4}

K-combinations

static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> 
    GetKCombs<T>(IEnumerable<T> list, int length) where T : IComparable
{
    if (length == 1) return list.Select(t => new T[] { t });
    return GetKCombs(list, length - 1)
        .SelectMany(t => list.Where(o => o.CompareTo(t.Last()) > 0), 
            (t1, t2) => t1.Concat(new T[] { t2 }));
}

Output:

{1,2} {1,3} {1,4} {2,3} {2,4} {3,4}
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That's called permutations.

This can give you the permutations of any collection:

public class Permutation {

  public static IEnumerable<T[]> GetPermutations<T>(T[] items) {
    int[] work = new int[items.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < work.Length; i++) {
      work[i] = i;
    }
    foreach (int[] index in GetIntPermutations(work, 0, work.Length)) {
      T[] result = new T[index.Length];
      for (int i = 0; i < index.Length; i++) result[i] = items[index[i]];
      yield return result;
    }
  }

  public static IEnumerable<int[]> GetIntPermutations(int[] index, int offset, int len) {
    if (len == 1) {
      yield return index;
    } else if (len == 2) {
      yield return index;
      Swap(index, offset, offset + 1);
      yield return index;
      Swap(index, offset, offset + 1);
    } else {
      foreach (int[] result in GetIntPermutations(index, offset + 1, len - 1)) {
        yield return result;
      }
      for (int i = 1; i < len; i++) {
        Swap(index, offset, offset + i);
        foreach (int[] result in GetIntPermutations(index, offset + 1, len - 1)) {
          yield return result;
        }
        Swap(index, offset, offset + i);
      }
    }
  }

  private static void Swap(int[] index, int offset1, int offset2) {
    int temp = index[offset1];
    index[offset1] = index[offset2];
    index[offset2] = temp;
  }

}

Example:

string[] items = { "one", "two", "three" };
foreach (string[] permutation in Permutation.GetPermutations<string>(items)) {
  Console.WriteLine(String.Join(", ", permutation));
}
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1  
I think there is difference between permutation and combination –  Ahmed Said Dec 23 '09 at 11:59
    
@Ahmed: "All the different ways of ordering the items" is clearly permutations. If your code is doing something different, then it doesn't answer the question. –  Guffa Dec 23 '09 at 12:07
    
How can i use the above class for this type of collection float[,] permutations = new float[90,600]; It would be really helpful if you can you explain with an example. –  RAZER Feb 19 '13 at 6:55
    
@RAZER: You would have to flatten it to a single dimension array, however the number of permutations would be collossal. I can't even calculate it. Just 3000 items would give 4.15e+9130 permutations... –  Guffa Feb 19 '13 at 7:02
    
Oh sorry the declaration is like this List<int[]> image_matrix = new List<int[]>(); So i guess only 90 permutations. –  RAZER Feb 19 '13 at 7:41

Maybe kwcombinatorics can provide some assistance (see example on home page):

The KwCombinatorics library are 3 classes that provide 3 different ways of generating ordered (ranked) lists of combinations of numbers. These combinatorics are useful for software testing, allowing the generation of various types of possible combinations of input. Other uses include solving mathematical problems and games of chance.

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For detailed answer see: Donald Knuth, The Art of computer programming (aka TAOCP). Volume 4A, Enumeration and Backtracking, chapter 7.2. Generating all possibilities. http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~uno/taocp.html

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Regarding Pengyang answer: Here is my generic function which can return all the combinations from a list of T:

static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>
    GetCombinations<T>(IEnumerable<T> list, int length)
{
    if (length == 1) return list.Select(t => new T[] { t });

    return GetCombinations(list, length - 1)
        .SelectMany(t => list, (t1, t2) => t1.Concat(new T[] { t2 }));
}

Example 1:n=3,k=2

IEnumerable<IEnumerable<int>> result =
    GetCombinations(Enumerable.Range(1, 3), 2);

Output - a list of integer-lists:

{1, 1} {1, 2} {1, 3} {2, 1} {2, 2} {2, 3} {3, 1} {3, 2} {3, 3}

.............................................................................

I ran this example and I am not quite sure about the rightness of the results.

Example 2:n=3, k=3

IEnumerable<IEnumerable<int>> result =
    GetCombinations(Enumerable.Range(1, 3), 3);

Output - a list of integer-lists:

{1, 1, 1} {1, 1, 2} {1, 1, 3} 
{1, 2, 1} {1, 2, 2} {1, 2, 3} 
{1, 3, 1} {1, 3, 2} {1, 3, 3}
{2, 1, 1} {2, 1, 2} {2, 1, 3} 
{2, 2, 1} {2, 2, 2} {2, 2, 3} 
{2, 3, 1} {2, 3, 2} {2, 3, 3}
{3, 1, 1} {3, 1, 2} {3, 1, 3} 
{3, 2, 1} {3, 2, 2} {3, 2, 3} 
{3, 3, 1} {3, 3, 2} {3, 3, 3}

This should not happen with combinations otherwise it should specify it is with repetition.See article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combinations

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Thanks for your input. I've updated my answer with more solutions. –  Pengyang Mar 13 at 7:11

Another version of the solution given by Gufa. Below the complete source code of the class:

using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication1 { public class Permutation {

    public IEnumerable<T[]> GetPermutations<T>(T[] items)
    {
        var work = new int[items.Length];
        for (var i = 0; i < work.Length; i++)
        {
            work[i] = i;
        }
        foreach (var index in GetIntPermutations(work, 0, work.Length))
        {
            var result = new T[index.Length];
            for (var i = 0; i < index.Length; i++) result[i] = items[index[i]];
            yield return result;
        }
    }

    public IEnumerable<int[]> GetIntPermutations(int[] index, int offset, int len)
    {
        switch (len)
        {
            case 1:
                yield return index;
                break;
            case 2:
                yield return index;
                Swap(index, offset, offset + 1);
                yield return index;
                Swap(index, offset, offset + 1);
                break;
            default:
                foreach (var result in GetIntPermutations(index, offset + 1, len - 1))
                {
                    yield return result;
                }
                for (var i = 1; i < len; i++)
                {
                    Swap(index, offset, offset + i);
                    foreach (var result in GetIntPermutations(index, offset + 1, len - 1))
                    {
                        yield return result;
                    }
                    Swap(index, offset, offset + i);
                }
                break;
        }
    }

    private static void Swap(IList<int> index, int offset1, int offset2)
    {
        var temp = index[offset1];
        index[offset1] = index[offset2];
        index[offset2] = temp;
    }

}

}

This actually worked as it should for combinations.But is does not allow to chose combinations of n in k ...

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