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I have browsed the internet extensively on this issue, including stackoverflow. My problem is that I have a set of 'li', and I want multiple 'li' added to an array when I use ctrl+click gesture. I keep on getting (e) is not defined. I have found this: Detect CTRL and SHIFT key without keydown event?

But the answer provided, which seems to have worked for many, doesn't for me. Whenever I use that, even as the sole item in my script, firebug doesn't respond in the console, but I get: " ReferenceError: e is not defined." I'm using Firefox.

My biggest problem is getting this to add this to a function, and the function, which fires as an event, can distinguish between the a ctrl+click and normal click.

Any expertise to help me out? Vanilla Javascript preferred.

The point of this exercise is to remove the LI when clicked, but I want to delete multiple at once if I hold down ctrl. Perhaps by storing them in an array. EDIT: Some Code

    <ul id = "ulItem">
<li>item1</li>
<li>item2</li>
<li>item3</li>
<li>item4</li>
</ul>

<script>

window.onload = function(){
var ulItem = document.getElementById("ulItem"); //gets UL with the "ulItem" ID.
var ulList = ulItem.getElementsByTagName("li"); //gets ulItem's "li" in an array.



///prepareLI function.///
var prepareLi = function(){

for(i = 0; i < ulList.length; i++){

ulList[i].addEventListener('click', elementClick);
}
}

//adds the same event listener to each of the "li" inside "UlList" array. Each activated by a click.




///elementClick function.///

var elementClick = function(){

ulItem.removeChild(this);

} //if this is a child of parent, UlList, remove it.

prepareLi();
}
share|improve this question
3  
Could you post your code so far? (preferably in a fiddle or something similar) – gotohales Oct 22 '13 at 15:07
    
@mookamafoob Preferably not in a fiddle; code has to go in the question or the question should be closed. – meagar Oct 22 '13 at 15:07
    
Actually :) post here your code, the fiddle is just if you want us to visualize the issue and get fast a reliable answer. – Roko C. Buljan Oct 22 '13 at 15:08
2  
@meagar I didn't mean exclusively in a fiddle :P but an example is easier to debug – gotohales Oct 22 '13 at 15:08
1  
Your elementClick function doesn't accept any arguments. You did not follow the example in Detect CTRL and SHIFT key without keydown event? correctly. The example there has function(e) { ... }, where yours is function() { ... }. That's why your get a message that e is not defined: the example defines e as an argument, but your code never defines e. – apsillers Oct 22 '13 at 17:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I found an alternative way to do this. If you want to emulate a Ctrl+click in order to select multiple objects, this worked for me as a workaround:

make two variables, loader and loaderArray:

var loader = 1;
var loaderArray = [];

set a document event:

document.addEventListener('mousedown', MultiSelect);

and a click event on the item:

document.addEventListener('click', singleSelect);

Make sure the window event is is a mousedown item, also, that Ctrl is defined as keyCode == 17. The number part is VERY important. Here is code I used:

    function loadArray(e) {

        if (e.keyCode === 17) {

            //console.log("key down");

            loader = 2;

        };

    }

Then I set a separate function on the singleSelect event stating that if loader ==2, use loaderArray.push(this) rather than the normal way of doing things when loader == 1. The loader Array then collects the variables, and you can do whatever you want with the array using for() or some other loop.

Now, whenever I click the Ctrl key, the mousevent on the document turns the loader variable to 2, and it can distinguish between Ctrl+click and normal click this way.

Thanks for all those that helped, and I hope this will help others! :)

share|improve this answer

The browser is correctly telling you that you never declared e, while the example in Detect CTRL and SHIFT key without keydown event? has defined e, by declaring it as a formal argument to the listener function.

var elementClick = function(e){
    if(e.ctrlKey) {
        ulItem.removeChild(this);
    }
}

Note the use of function(e){ rather than function(){

share|improve this answer

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