Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was doing a tutorial and came across a way to handle connections with sqlite3, Then I studied about the WITH keyword and found out that it is an alternative to try,except,finally way of doing things

It was said that in case of file-handling, 'WITH' automatically handles closing of files and I thought similar with the connection as said in zetcode tutorial:-

"With the with keyword, the Python interpreter automatically releases the resources. It also provides error handling." http://zetcode.com/db/sqlitepythontutorial/

so I thought it would be good to use this way of handling things, but I couldn't figure out why both (inner scope and outer scope) statements work? shouldn't the WITH release the connection?

import sqlite3

con = sqlite3.connect('test.db')

with con:    
    cur = con.cursor()    

    cur.execute('SELECT 1,SQLITE_VERSION()')
    data = cur.fetchone()   
    print data        

cur.execute('SELECT 2,SQLITE_VERSION()')
data = cur.fetchone()
print data

which outputs

(1, u'3.6.21')
(2, u'3.6.21')

I don't know what exactly the WITH is doing here(or does in general), so, if you will please elaborate on the use of with over TRY CATCH in this context.

And should the connections be opened and closed on each query? (I am formulating queries inside a function which I call each time with an argument) Would it be a good practice?

share|improve this question
    
Have a read of: docs.python.org/2/library/… - that should explain your question – Jon Clements Oct 22 '13 at 15:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the docs: http://docs.python.org/2/library/sqlite3.html#using-the-connection-as-a-context-manager

Connection objects can be used as context managers that automatically commit or rollback transactions. In the event of an exception, the transaction is rolled back; otherwise, the transaction is committed:

So, the context manager doesn't release the connection, instead, it ensures that any transactions occurring on the connection are rolled back if any exception occurs, or committed otherwise... Useful for DELETE, UPDATE and INSERT queries for instance.

share|improve this answer
    
so no releasing of resources or error handling as advertised then? – Aavaas Oct 22 '13 at 16:08
    
The tutorial you're reading is a bit misleading. There is no explicit closure of the connection when using the default context manager. You may want to look at contextlib.closing... – Jon Clements Oct 22 '13 at 16:15

In general, a context manager is free to do whatever its author wants it to do when used. Set/reset a certain system state, cleaning up resources after use, acquiring/releasing a lock, etc.

In particular, as Jon already writes, a database connection object creates a transaction when used as a context manager. If you want to auto-close the connection, you can do

with contextlib.closing(sqlite3.connect('test.db')) as con:
    with con as cur:
        cur.execute('SELECT 1,SQLITE_VERSION()')
        data = cur.fetchone()   
        print data        

    with con as cur:
        cur.execute('SELECT 2,SQLITE_VERSION()')
        data = cur.fetchone()
        print data
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.