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Is there a method like isiterable? The only solution I have found so far is to call

hasattr(myObj, '__iter__')

But I am not sure how fool-proof this is.

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2  
__getitem__ is also sufficient to make an object iterable –  Kos Jul 2 '12 at 14:58
7  
IMP: Answer from Georg Schölly is the MOST CORRECT ANSWER –  Raghu Apr 3 '13 at 21:04
    
FWIW: iter(myObj) succeeds if isinstance(myObj, dict), so if you're looking at a myObj that could be a sequence of dicts or a single dict, you'll succeed in both cases. A subtlety that is important if you want to know what's a sequence and what isn't. (in Python 2) –  Ben Mosher Jul 25 at 15:10

12 Answers 12

up vote 256 down vote accepted
  1. Checking for __iter__ works on sequence types, but it would fail on e.g. strings. I would like to know the right answer too, until then, here is one possibility (which would work on strings, too):

    try:
        some_object_iterator = iter(some_object)
    except TypeError, te:
        print some_object, 'is not iterable'
    

    The iter built-in checks for the __iter__ method or in the case of strings the __getitem__ method. To check if an object is "list like" and not "string like" then the key is the attributes __getitem__ and __iter__:

     In [9]: hasattr([1,2,3,4], '__iter__')
     Out[9]: True
     In [11]: hasattr((1,2,3,4), '__iter__')
     Out[11]: True
     In [12]: hasattr(u"hello", '__iter__')
     Out[12]: False
     In [14]: hasattr(u"hello", '__getitem__')
     Out[14]: True
    
  2. Another general pythonic approach is to assume an iterable, then fail gracefully if it does not work on the given object. The python glossary:

    Pythonic programming style that determines an object's type by inspection of its method or attribute signature rather than by explicit relationship to some type object ("If it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it must be a duck.") By emphasizing interfaces rather than specific types, well-designed code improves its flexibility by allowing polymorphic substitution. Duck-typing avoids tests using type() or isinstance(). Instead, it typically employs the EAFP (Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission) style of programming.

    ...

    try:
       _ = (e for e in my_object)
    except TypeError:
       print my_object, 'is not iterable'
    
  3. The collections module provides some abstract base classes, which allow to ask classes or instances if they provide particular functionality, for example:

    import collections
    
    if isinstance(e, collections.Iterable):
        # e is iterable
    
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11  
[e for e in my_object] can raise an exception for other reasons, ie my_object is undefined or possible bugs in my_object implementation. –  Nick Dandoulakis Dec 23 '09 at 12:39
16  
A string is a sequence (isinstance('', Sequence) == True) and as any sequence it is iterable (isinstance('', Iterable)). Though hasattr('', '__iter__') == False and it might be confusing. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 24 '09 at 0:11
48  
If my_object is very large (say, infinite like itertools.count()) your list comprehension will take up a lot of time/memory. Better to make a generator, which will never try to build a (potentially infinite) list. –  Chris Lutz Dec 24 '09 at 3:42
7  
What if some_object throws TypeError caused by other reason(bugs etc.) too? How can we tell it from the "Not iterable TypeError"? –  Shaung Sep 13 '11 at 7:34
2  
@PiotrDobrogost miku replied to Nick by adding the check that the exception is of type TypeError. Shaung then asked if we can be sure the only way TypeError may be raised is if the object's not iterable. So it's not a repeat of Nick's question. It seems Arne's suggestion might address the problem. Perhaps someone will comment on it? –  max Dec 15 '12 at 19:50

Duck typing

try:
    iterator = iter(theElement)
except TypeError:
    # not iterable
else:
    # iterable

# for obj in iterator:
#     pass

Type checking

Use the Abstract Base Classes. They need at least Python 2.6 and work only for new-style classes.

import collections

if isinstance(theElement, collections.Iterable):
    # iterable
else:
    # not iterable
share|improve this answer
21  
+1 for being the first to mention collections.Iterable! –  Scott Griffiths Dec 23 '09 at 13:22
1  
Awesome and simple. Gogogo!! –  jathanism Dec 23 '09 at 18:09
17  
This should have been the one accepted. Another frustrating result from SO readers. –  Brandon Dec 23 '09 at 18:31
7  
isinstance(x, ABC) doesn't work on instances of old-style classes. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 24 '09 at 0:04
7  
Is iter() guaranteed to never throw a TypeError for any other reason?? –  mehaase May 24 '12 at 15:23

This isn't sufficient: the object returned by __iter__ must implement the iteration protocol (i.e. next method). See the relevant section in the documentation.

In Python, a good practice is to " try and see " instead of "checking".

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4  
"duck typing" I believe? :) –  willem Dec 23 '09 at 12:25
6  
@willem: or "don't ask for permission but for forgiveness" ;-) –  jldupont Dec 23 '09 at 12:29
4  
@willem Both "permission" and "forgiveness" styles qualify as duck typing. If you ask what an object can do rather than what it is, that's duck typing. If you use introspection, that's "permission"; if you just try to do it and see if it works or not, that's "forgiveness". –  Mark Reed Nov 12 '13 at 1:44
1  
I learnt something new, thanks @Mark –  willem Jan 17 at 14:52

The best solution I've found so far:

hasattr(obj, '__contains__')

which basically checks if the object implements the in operator.

Advantages (none of the other solutions has all three):

  • it is an expression (works as a lambda, as opposed to the try...catch variant)
  • it is (should be) implemented by all iterables, including strings (as opposed to __iter__)
  • works on any Python >= 2.5

Notes:

  • the Python philosophy of "ask for forgiveness, not permission" doesn't work well when e.g. in a list you have both iterables and non-iterables and you need to treat each element differently according to it's type (treating iterables on try and non-iterables on except would work, but it would look butt-ugly and misleading)
  • solutions to this problem which attempt to actually iterate over the object (e.g. [x for x in obj]) to check if it's iterable may induce significant performance penalties for large iterables (especially if you just need the first few elements of the iterable, for example) and should be avoided
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2  
Nice, but why not use the collections module as proposed in stackoverflow.com/questions/1952464/…? Seems more expressive to me. –  Dave Abrahams May 3 '11 at 4:10
1  
It's shorter (and doesn't require additional imports) without losing any clarity: having a "contains" method feels like a natural way to check if something is a collection of objects. –  Vlad Nov 25 '11 at 12:04
23  
Just because something can contain something doesn't necessarily mean it's iterable. For example, a user can check if a point is in a 3D cube, but how would you iterate through this object? –  Darthfett May 18 '12 at 14:52
try:
  #treat object as iterable
except TypeError, e:
  #object is not actually iterable

Don't run checks to see if your duck really is a duck to see if it is iterable or not, treat it as if it was and complain if it wasn't.

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2  
Technically, during iteration your computation might throw a TypeError and throw you off here, but basically yes. –  Chris Lutz Dec 23 '09 at 12:22
    
I know in .NET it was a bad idea to have exceptions handle program flow, as exceptions were slow. How quickly does python handle exceptions? –  willem Dec 23 '09 at 12:26
5  
@willem: Please use timeit to perform a benchmark. Python exceptions are often faster than if-statements. They can take a slightly shorter path through the interpreter. –  S.Lott Dec 23 '09 at 14:24
2  
@willem: IronPython has slow (compared to CPython) exceptions. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 24 '09 at 0:01
    
A working try: statement is really fast. So if you have few exceptions, try-except is fast. If you expect many exceptions, “if” can be faster. –  Arne Babenhauserheide Jun 22 '12 at 10:04

You could try this:

def iterable(a):
    try:
        (x for x in a)
        return True
    except TypeError:
        return False

If we can make a generator that iterates over it (but never use the generator so it doesn't take up space), it's iterable. Seems like a "duh" kind of thing. Why do you need to determine if a variable is iterable in the first place?

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What about iterable(itertools.repeat(0))? :) –  badp Dec 23 '09 at 12:24
2  
@badp, the (x for x in a) just creates a generator, it doesn't do any iteration on a. –  catchmeifyoutry Dec 23 '09 at 12:31
    
Oh, nice! I didn't know about that one. Sorry. –  badp Dec 23 '09 at 12:34
1  
Is trying (x for x in a) precisely equivalent to trying iterator = iter(a)? Or there are some cases where the two are different? –  max Dec 15 '12 at 20:05
2  
@PiotrDobrogost: to answer my question, I believe they are equivalent. They are also roughly equivalent to checking isinstance(obj, collections.Iterable). The differences are: (a) someone can register a class with Iterable even though it doesn't support iteration; (b) a TypeError may be caused by something other than non-iterability of obj. I'd say if you want the same behavior regardless of the reason the iteration failed, you should use try/except; if you want a certain behavior only if obj is not iterable, isinstance(obj, Iterable) is best. (Everything I said is for Python 3.) –  max Dec 16 '12 at 21:48

Found a nice solution here:

isiterable = lambda obj: isinstance(obj, basestring) \
    or getattr(obj, '__iter__', False)
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On python <= 2.5, you can't and shouldn't - iterable was an "informal" interface.

But since python2.6 and 3.0 you can leverage the new ABC (abstract base class) infrastructure along with some builtin ABCs which are available in the collections module:

from collections import Iterable

class MyObject(object):
    pass

mo = MyObject()
print isinstance(mo, Iterable)
Iterable.register(MyObject)
print isinstance(mo, Iterable)

print isinstance("abc", Iterable)

Now, whether this is desiderable or actually works, is just a matter of conventions. As you can see, you can register a non-iterable object as Iterable - and it will raise an exception at runtime. Hence, isinstance acquires a "new" meaning - it just checks for "declared" type compatibility, which is a good way to go in Python.

On the other hand, if your object does not satifsy the interface you need, what are you going to do? take the following example:

from collections import Iterable
from traceback import print_exc

def check_and_raise(x):
    if not isinstance(x, Iterable):
        raise TypeError, "%s is not iterable" % x
    else:
        for i in x:
            print i

def just_iter(x):
    for i in x:
        print i


class NotIterable(object):
    pass

if __name__ == "__main__":
    try:
        check_and_raise(5)
    except:
        print_exc()
        print

    try:
        just_iter(5)
    except:
        print_exc()
        print



    try:
        Iterable.register(NotIterable)
        ni = NotIterable()
        check_and_raise(ni)
    except:
        print_exc()
        print

If the object doesn't satifsy what you expect, you just throw a TypeError, but if the proper ABC has been registered, your check is unuseful. On the contrary, if the __iter__ method is available python will automatically recognize object of that class as being Iterable.

So, if you just expect an iterable, iterate over it and forget it. On the other hand, if you need to do different things depending on input type, you might find the ABC infrastracture pretty useful.

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+1: ABC's rule. –  S.Lott Dec 23 '09 at 13:45
8  
don't use bare except: in the example code for beginners. It promotes bad practice. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 23 '09 at 23:59
    
J.F.S: I wouldn't, but I needed to go through multiple exception-raising code and I didn't want to catch the specific exception... I think the purpose of this code is pretty clear. –  Alan Franzoni Dec 24 '09 at 17:17

I often find convenient, inside my scripts, to define an iterable function. (Now incorporates Alfe's suggested simplification):

import collections

def iterable(obj):
    return isinstance(obj, collections.Iterable):

so you can test if any object is iterable in the very readable form

if iterable(obj):
    # act on iterable
else:
    # not iterable

as you would do with thecallable function

EDIT: if you have numpy installed, you can simply do: from numpy import iterable, which is simply something like

def iterable(obj):
    try: iter(obj)
    except: return False
    return True

If you do not have numpy, you can simply implement this code, or the one above.

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2  
Whenever you do sth like if x: return True else: return False (with x being boolean) you can write this as return x. In your case return isinstance(…) without any if. –  Alfe May 7 '13 at 21:34
    
Since you acknowledge that Alfe's solution is better, why didn't you edit your answer to simply say that? Instead, you now have BOTH versions in your answer. Unnecessary verbosity. Submitting an edit to fix this. –  ToolmakerSteve Dec 12 '13 at 23:21
1  
You should catch "TypeError" in the ` except: return False ` line. Catching everything is a bad pattern. –  Secator Jul 3 at 7:51
    
Know that. I translated that piece of code from the NumPy library, which uses the generic exception. –  fmonegaglia Aug 25 at 13:51

According to the Python 2 Glossary, iterables are

all sequence types (such as list, str, and tuple) and some non-sequence types like dict and file and objects of any classes you define with an __iter__() or __getitem__() method. Iterables can be used in a for loop and in many other places where a sequence is needed (zip(), map(), ...). When an iterable object is passed as an argument to the built-in function iter(), it returns an iterator for the object.

Of course, given the general coding style for Python based on the fact that it's “Easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.”, the general expectation is to use

try:
    for i in object_in_question:
        do_something
except TypeError:
    do_something_for_non_iterable

But if you need to check it explicitly, you can test for an iterable by hasattr(object_in_question, "__iter__") or hasattr(object_in_question, "__getitem__"). You need to check for both, because strs don't have an __iter__ method (at least not in Python 2, in Python 3 they do) and because generator objects don't have a __getitem__ method.

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Instead of trying to create an iterator with iter(object), you could use len(object). len() works on all built-in iterable types, and no built-in non-iterable types.

Obviously, if you're working with user defined classes, some may not follow conventions and may not define a length (though I will say that I think every class offered in collections.abc forces you to, but that may not be an acceptable assumption).

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Re "Obviously, if you're working with user defined classes, some may not follow conventions and may not define a length". FYI, I have encountered this problem (no "len", but iterable), in SWIG generated wrapper around some C++. –  ToolmakerSteve Dec 12 '13 at 23:26
    
Even so, I would venture a guess that such a class would tend be the exception, rather than the rule. –  Kevin Dec 12 '13 at 23:37
4  
len does not work with generators, which are a very common iterable –  Peter Gibson Apr 24 at 7:55

Some will come here looking for a way to test if they've drilled down to a string.

As shown in several other answers, the OP's solution returns False for that case (i.e. bedrock reached), but, as OP notes, something remains unsatisfying about it.

The solution

import collections
isinstance(myObj, collections.Iterable)

returns True for strings (since str is, as pointed out in the comments, iterable).

For string drilling, I ended up with

isinstance(myObj, collections.Iterable) and not isinstance(myObj, basestring)

via this answer.

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