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I have 2 buttons: button1 and Button2. And I have the following code:

$(document).ready(function() {
  var message = "hello 1";
  $("#button1").on("click", function() {
    alert(message);
  });
  message = "hello 2";
  $("#button2").on("click", function() {
    alert(message);
  });
});

When I click on button1 I am getting "hello 2". I thought this would be closure and I will be getting "hello 1". Please help

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closures in javascripts not copying parent scope, so, if message is changed outside, then inside of scope it will change too. –  Waterlink Oct 22 '13 at 18:18
1  
Each listener function is a closure (or is part of a closure, depending on how you like to look at it). A closure is functional code plus a set of in-scope variables. In this case, both closures have the same set of in-scope variables, so they have a shared message variable. –  apsillers Oct 22 '13 at 18:24

4 Answers 4

A closure doesn't save the value of a variable, it just saves a particular local variable instance. So the assignment message = "hello 2" updates the variable that is in both closures.

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Scope in JavaScript is hold in a function. Each time you declare a function, it creates a scope (a closure). So yes, you created a closure, but the behavior you see is the one you should expect.

Here, message is scoped to the document ready callback. And each click handlers refers to this same scope when searching for the message variable value. As so, the message variable hold the same value at the time click events are triggered.

To see it, just check the scope as a chain:

"document ready"
  - var message (it is declared here and can only have one value at a given time)
  - "#button1 click handler"
    - no var (so it'll search the parent scope for the value)
  - "#button2 click handler"
    - no var

Each scope then refers to their parent scope to search for a variable not belonging to its own scope.

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You're defining a global variable message, and assigning values to it. When the .on('click'... stuff is executed, the NAME of the message variable is embedded in those freshly-created functions, not its value at-the-the-time-the-function-is-defined.

So when you do actually click on those buttons, JS takes the variable NAME that was embedded in the functions, looks up its CURRENT value (which is 'hello 2'), and there's your output.

If you were impossibly quick and your browser running relatively slowly, you could POSSIBLY manage to click on your #button1 and get hello 1, IF the JS engine hasn't actually managed to actually start executing that message = 'hello 2'; line yet. But that's essentially impossible to do. You're not that quick.

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2  
It's not a global variable, since it's declared locally with var. –  Barmar Oct 22 '13 at 18:18

While those are closures, both of the closures are referencing the message variable. When the #button1 on click function is called (when the user clicks on it), it uses the current value of the message variable, which is changed to "hello 2" before the end of your ready function.

You can avoid this by not re-using the same variable for different messages, as in the below example:

$(document).ready(function() {
  var message1 = "hello 1";
  $("#button1").on("click", function() {
    alert(message1);
  });
  var message2 = "hello 2";
  $("#button2").on("click", function() {
    alert(message2);
  });
});
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