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I have a small script that processes many thousand small files. The operation takes a while, so the program outputs progress to the console. It's simulated in the code below:

files = 5000 #Number of files
    for i in range(files):
        sys.stdout.write("\r{0} of {1}".format(i, files))

I like this way of outputting progress; only a single line is printed in the console. However now I want to run this script from a GUI (tkinter), and I want the output to be printed to a statusbar (a label). I'm a bit at loss right now how to implement this. Is there a way I can handle the output in the GUI without editing the script?

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You could do this by replacing sys.stdout with your own file-like object that intercepted every write, simulated \r handling, and forwarded the output to the statusbar (or, more simply, just assumed the only thing you ever do is write("\rfoo") and just handle that). But that really isn't a good idea. It's much better to make the script call some progress function, and provide different implementations for console, Tkinter, or other potential frontends. –  abarnert Oct 22 '13 at 19:25
    
Also, having an operation that takes a while running in your main thread is going to freeze up your entire GUI. Besides giving you a beachball or your platform's equivalent non-responsive app warning, it also means you won't get to see whatever changes you make to the status bar until this operation finishes. Putting it on a background thread, on the other hand, means it can't update the GUI. So… this whole design doesn't work in the first place. –  abarnert Oct 22 '13 at 19:31
    
@abarnert Thanks for the feedback. Sounds like having a progress function is the way to go. Regarding the second comment; is there a way to go around this? Not having the ability to update the status bar while the operation is running is a big drawback for having a GUI in the first place –  Olav Oct 22 '13 at 19:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

While you can intercept stdout and do whatever you want with it, this is a bad idea—and, even if you do that, your program doesn't make sense in the first place.

You can't run an operation that "takes a while" in a GUI app. While the operation is running, your GUI's main loop is not running, which means the entire GUI is frozen. Besides giving you a beachball, this also means that any changes you make won't be visible until you return.

What if you did the operation in another thread? Well, then it wouldn't prevent the GUI from running… but you can't talk to Tkinter widgets from any thread but the main thread, so that doesn't help.

So, what you need to do is do a single step of your operation at a time, each time scheduling the rest of the operation as a callback to do later.

For example:

class StatusWriter(object):
    def write(self, msg):
        statusbar.config(text=msg[1:])

def count():
    sys.stdout = StatusWriter()
    i = 0
    def step():
        nonlocal i
        sys.stdout.write("\r{} of {}".format(i, 50))
        i += 1
        if i == 50:
            sys.stdout = sys.__stdout__
        else:
            root.after(100, step)
    root.after(100, step)

But really, once you're rewriting things anyway, it makes a lot more sense to also remove the stdout-replacing hackery:

def count():
    sys.stdout = StatusWriter()
    i = 0
    def step():
        nonlocal i
        statusbar.config(text="{} of {}".format(i, 50))
        i += 1
        if i == 50:
            sys.stdout = sys.__stdout__
        else:
            root.after(100, step)
    root.after(100, step)
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