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I'm learning Twisted recently, and just now I re-read some basic docs on Deferred, here is some example code from:http://twistedmatrix.com/documents/12.3.0/core/howto/defer.html

What about commenting out the second g = Getter() out? Will there be re-enter poblem? Do you have some good ideas on how to avoid these kind of issue?

from twisted.internet import reactor, defer

class Getter:
    def gotResults(self, x):
        """
        The Deferred mechanism provides a mechanism to signal error
        conditions.  In this case, odd numbers are bad.

        This function demonstrates a more complex way of starting
        the callback chain by checking for expected results and
        choosing whether to fire the callback or errback chain
        """
        if self.d is None:
            print "Nowhere to put results"
            return

        d = self.d
        self.d = None
        if x % 2 == 0:
            d.callback(x*3)
        else:
            d.errback(ValueError("You used an odd number!"))

    def _toHTML(self, r):
        """
        This function converts r to HTML.

        It is added to the callback chain by getDummyData in
        order to demonstrate how a callback passes its own result
        to the next callback
        """
        return "Result: %s" % r

    def getDummyData(self, x):
        """
        The Deferred mechanism allows for chained callbacks.
        In this example, the output of gotResults is first
        passed through _toHTML on its way to printData.

        Again this function is a dummy, simulating a delayed result
        using callLater, rather than using a real asynchronous
        setup.
        """
        self.d = defer.Deferred()
        # simulate a delayed result by asking the reactor to schedule
        # gotResults in 2 seconds time
        reactor.callLater(2, self.gotResults, x)
        self.d.addCallback(self._toHTML)
        return self.d

def printData(d):
    print d

def printError(failure):
    import sys
    sys.stderr.write(str(failure))

# this series of callbacks and errbacks will print an error message
g = Getter()
d = g.getDummyData(3)
d.addCallback(printData)
d.addErrback(printError)

# this series of callbacks and errbacks will print "Result: 12"
#g = Getter() #<= What about commenting this line out? 
d = g.getDummyData(4)
d.addCallback(printData)
d.addErrback(printError)

reactor.callLater(4, reactor.stop)
reactor.run()
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1 Answer 1

Yes, if you comment the second g = Getter(), you will have a problem. The same Deferred will fire twice because you have the Deferred stored in the Getter object. In particular, the second call to getDummyData will overwrite the first Deferred.

You shouldn't do this. As a general point, I don't think it is a good idea to hold onto Deferred objects, because they can only fire once and it is all too easy to have a problem like you do.

What you should do is this:

def getDummyData(self, x):
    ...
    d = defer.Deferred()
    # simulate a delayed result by asking the reactor to schedule
    # gotResults in 2 seconds time
    reactor.callLater(2, self.gotResults, x, d)
    d.addCallback(self._toHTML)
    return d

And:

def gotResults(self, x, d):
    """
    The Deferred mechanism provides a mechanism to signal error
    conditions.  In this case, odd numbers are bad.

    This function demonstrates a more complex way of starting
    the callback chain by checking for expected results and
    choosing whether to fire the callback or errback chain
    """
    if d is None:
        print "Nowhere to put results"
        return

    if x % 2 == 0:
        d.callback(x*3)
    else:
        d.errback(ValueError("You used an odd number!"))

Notice that in this case Getter has no state, which is good, and you don't need a class for it!

My opinioin is that Deferreds should be used to give the caller of your function the ability to do something with the result when it becomes available. They should not be used for anything fancier. So, I always have

def func():
    d = defer.Deferred()
    ...
    return d

If the caller has to hold on to the Deferred for whatever reason, they may, but I can freely call func multiple times without having to worry about hidden state.

share|improve this answer
    
Totally agree with you, Getter should not have state, You just prevent me from making a same problem in another piece of code, Thanks! –  Daniel Dai Oct 23 '13 at 21:33

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