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We decided to sign our JNLP files by following this oracle guide. Since we have different JNLPs, we went for the second approach (Signing a JAR file with a JNLP template).

Here's the code we extracted into the template:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<jnlp spec="1.0+" codebase="*" href="*">
  <information>
    <title>*</title>
    <vendor>My vendor</vendor>
    <description>My description</description>
    <icon href="splash.jpg" kind="splash" width="700" height="400" size="115258"/>
    <offline-allowed />
    <shortcut>
      <menu submenu="My submenu"/>
    </shortcut>
  </information>

  <security>
    <all-permissions/>
  </security>

  <resources locale="en es ja">
    <j2se version="1.6+" initial-heap-size="128m" max-heap-size="384m" href="http://java.sun.com/products/autodl/j2se"/>
    <jar href="myjar.jar" main="true" download="lazy" part="core" size="*"/>
    <jar href="lib/commons-lang-2.6.jar" download="lazy" part="commons" size="297085"/>
    ...
    <jar href="lib/trident-6.0.jar" download="lazy" part="core" size="114496"/>
    <property name="jnlp.myProperty" value="*"/>
    <property name="log4j.configuration" value="*"/>
  </resources>

  <application-desc main-class="com.mycom.myapp.MyClass">
  </application-desc>
</jnlp>

... and here's one of the JNLPs we are actually using:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<jnlp spec="1.0+" codebase="http://mylocation.mycom.com/jnlp/myapp/" href="myapp.jnlp">
  <information>
    <title>My App - Production version</title>
    <vendor>My vendor</vendor>
    <description>My description</description>
    <icon href="splash.jpg" kind="splash" width="700" height="400" size="115258"/>
    <offline-allowed />
    <shortcut>
      <menu submenu="My submenu"/>
    </shortcut>
  </information>

  <security>
    <all-permissions/>
  </security>

  <resources locale="en es ja">
    <j2se version="1.6+" initial-heap-size="128m" max-heap-size="384m" href="http://java.sun.com/products/autodl/j2se"/>
    <jar href="myjar.jar" main="true" download="lazy" part="core" size="4189501"/>
    <jar href="lib/commons-lang-2.6.jar" download="lazy" part="commons" size="297085"/>
    ...
    <jar href="lib/trident-6.0.jar" download="lazy" part="core" size="114496"/>
    <property name="jnlp.myProperty" value="http://mylocation.mycom.com/jnlp/myapp/MyApp.properties"/>
    <property name="log4j.configuration" value="http://mylocation.mycom.com/jnlp/myapp/log4j.xml"/>
  </resources>

  <application-desc main-class="com.mycom.myapp.MyClass">
  </application-desc>
</jnlp>

notice that I used the wildcard(*) for:

  1. The codebase attribute in tag jnlp
  2. The href attribute in tag jnlp
  3. Content inside title tags
  4. attribute size in jar tag
  5. the value of the two properties

I put the template inside the appropriate JNLP-INF folder (with the appropriate name as well) and we signed the JAR after that. However, we keep getting a JNLPSigningException with the following message:

Failed to validate signing of launch file. The signed version does not match the downloaded version.

Does anyone have an idea of what am I missing?

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3 Answers 3

I had this same issue, but it turned out that my src/JNLP-INF/APPLICATION.JNLP file included in the signed .jar file (used as a signed jnlp file) was different than the application.jnlp file being used in the web application defined in the <applet> tags. Once I made them the same, error went away.

Word of caution using signed JNLP files within the .jar file, the file needs to be named exactly JNLP-INF/APPLICATION.JNLP as it is used as a template to match the jnlp being called within the application:

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I believe it is unhappy about the wildcard in the tag. I ran into this exact situation. For testing purposes, I removed the wildcard and jammed the other value. Worked fine -- but is unacceptable solution since that's the whole point of the property!

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thanks Nick. I'll try that but, as you say, it loses the point since I need to keep flexibility in my configuration. I was wondering if you used one or more wildcards for the same reason I used mine... maybe when the template is being parsed, some of the wildcards match ok, but others are just out of place –  Yego Oct 23 '13 at 14:41
    
My wild goose chase ended happily for now. My original problem was not being able to get properties set in the JNLP. I went down the road of the signed jar and creating the silly JNLP template. That was a dead end -- because apparently the wildcard doesn't work in properties. I scrapped the template and went back to my original JNLP file and changed the property names to have the "jnlp." prefix -- and changed my code to read such properties. That worked for me. –  Nick Oct 23 '13 at 16:43

I had this problem on Java 1.7.0_45 on a self-signed war, the solution was to remove properties without jnlp. prefix. In your case try removing:

<property name="log4j.configuration" value="http://mylocation.mycom.com/jnlp/myapp/log4j.xml"/>
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