Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am running external code as a 3rd party extension to a node.js service. The API methods return promises. A resolved promise means the action was carried out successfully, a failed promise means there was some problem carrying out the operation.

Now here's where I'm having trouble.

Since the 3rd party code is unknown, there could be bugs, syntax errors, type issues, any number of things that could cause node.js to throw an exception.

However, since all the code is wrapped up in promises, these thrown exceptions are actually coming back as failed promises.

I tried to put the function call within a try/catch block, but it's never triggered:

// worker process
var mod = require('./3rdparty/module.js');
try {
  mod.run().then(function (data) {
    sendToClient(true, data);
  }, function (err) {
    sendToClient(false, err);
  });
} catch (e) {
  // unrecoverable error inside of module
  // ... send signal to restart this worker process ...
});

In the above psuedo-code example, when an error is thrown it turns up in the failed promise function, and not in the catch.

From what I read, this is a feature, not an issue, with promises. However I'm having trouble wrapping my head around why you'd always want to treat exceptions and expected rejections exactly the same.

One case is about actual bugs in the code, possibly irrecoverable -- the other is just possible missing configuration information, or a parameter, or something recoverable.

Thanks for any help!

share|improve this question
    
The design is that there are no expected rejections (I don't like it), the actual feature is that exceptions are reported even if thrown in asynchronous code –  Bergi Oct 23 '13 at 10:10
    
@Bergi because having to restart the server is much more desirable? wat –  Esailija Oct 23 '13 at 10:45
    
@Esailija: How else would unknown exceptions supposed to be handled? I would prefer to catch known exceptions by hand and trigger rejection manually, and use domains/window.onerror/process.onuncaughtexceptions for everything else. –  Bergi Oct 23 '13 at 10:51
    
@Bergi by closing any opened resources and reporting an error to the user? You still have to crash the server even if you use uncaught exception because you don't know what resources were left open. –  Esailija Oct 23 '13 at 10:52
    
@Esailija: That as well of course, but it's recommended to still restart the process after that –  Bergi Oct 23 '13 at 10:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Crashing and restarting a process is not a valid strategy to deal with errors, not even bugs. Not in node, where a process is not a lightweight thing.

For example, if you have thousands of requests, 0.5% hitting a throwing path means over 50 process shutdowns and most likely denial of service. Not to mention that users hitting an error tend to start refreshing the page, thereby compounding the problem.

Domains don't solve the issue because they cannot ensure that resources are not leaked.

Read more at issues #5114 and #5149

With promises you can easily build context-managers that always clean up resources:

function using(resource, fn) {
  // wraps it in case the resource was not promise
  var pResource = Promise.cast(resource); 
  return pResource.then(fn).finally(function() { 
    return pResource.then(function(resource) { 
      return resource.dispose(); 
    }); 
  });
}

Then use them like so:

function connectAndFetchSomething(...) {
  return using(client.connect(host), function(conn) {
    var stuff = JSON.parse(something);
    return conn.doThings(stuff).then(function(res) { 
      return conn.doOherThingWith(JSON.parse(res)); 
    ));
  }); 
});

The resources will always be disposed of after the promise chain returned within using's fn argument completes. Even if an error was thrown within that function (e.g. from JSON.parse) or its inner .then closures (like the second JSON.parse), or if a promise in the chain was rejected (equivalent to callbacks calling with an error).

Edit: But what do we do with libraries that follow the throw-crash paradigm? We cannot ensure that they have cleaned up their resources - how can we avoid promises subverting their exceptions?

Usually these libraries use node style callbacks and we need to wrap them with promises anyway. For example, we may have:

function unwrapped(arg1, arg2, done) {
  var resource = allocateResource();
  mayThrowError1();
  resource.doesntThrow(arg1, function(err, res) {
    mayThrowError2(arg2);
    done(err, res);
  });
}

mayThrowError2() is within an inner callback and will still crash the process if it throws, even if unwrapped is called within another promise's .then

However, mayThrowError1() will be caught by the promise if called within .then, and the inner allocated resource will leak.

We can wrap this function in a way that makes sure that any thrown errors are unrecoverable and crash the process:

function wrapped(arg1, arg2) {
  var defer = Promise.pending();
  try {
    unwrapped(arg1, arg2, function callback(err, res) {
      if (err) defer.reject(err);
      else defer.fulfill(res);
    });
  } catch (e) {
    process.nextTick(function rethrow() { throw e; });
  }
}

Using the wrapped function within another promise's .then callback now results with a process crash if unwrapped throws, falling back to the throw-crash paradigm.

Its the general hope that as you use more and more promise based libraries, they would use the context manager pattern to manage their resources and therefore you would have less need to let the process crash.

None of these solutions are bulletproof - not even node's way of dealing with errors. For example, this node style function will leak resources even though it doesn't throw - promises or no promises:

function unwrapped(arg1, arg2, done) {
  var resource = allocateResource();
  resource.doSomething(arg1, function(err, res) {
    if (err) return done(err);
    resource.doSomethingElse(res, function(err, res) {
      resource.dispose();
      done(err, res);
    });
  });
}

Why? Because when doSomething's callback receives an error, the code forgets to dispose of the resource.

However, promise-based context managers are really easy to use - they're very similar to with in python and using in C#. As such they should help to reduce resource leaks.

References: why I am switching to promises, context managers and transactions

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this explanation, it's starting to make more sense. However, since these 'modules' are 3rd party code, I can't ensure that they are cleaning up their resources correctly, which is the crux of the issue. Is there a way to clean out resources used in a module without knowing what they were? (they could be websocket connects, http requests or servers, any number of things could be going on in one of these modules). –  Nick Jennings Oct 23 '13 at 12:31
    
Also, are there some node modules which implement this type of cleanup management? –  Nick Jennings Oct 23 '13 at 12:33
    
If the module is written using promises, you shouldn't have to ensure it. If you're wrapping a (callback based) module that follows the throw-crash paradigm, and don't want promises subverting that, I suppose your wrapper can use process.nextTick to escape the promise error propagation. –  Gorgi Kosev Oct 23 '13 at 12:54
    
Of course promises still don't capture errors within inner node-style callbacks of the library, so those will happily continue to crash the process. I should probably write an article that expands upon all this in more detail. –  Gorgi Kosev Oct 23 '13 at 13:08
    
If the module uses promises, why shouldn't you have to ensure they've cleaned up their connections or objects? Not sure how you can make that leap, when in your example you wrote custom code to clean up your connection -- I can't be sure the module is well written. I need to be able to wipe the slate clean if I get a failure. –  Nick Jennings Oct 23 '13 at 13:25

It is almost the most important feature of promises. If it wasn't there, you might as well use callbacks:

var fs = require("fs");

fs.readFile("myfile.json", function(err, contents) {
    if( err ) {
        console.error("Cannot read file");
    }
    else {
        try {
            var result = JSON.parse(contents);
            console.log(result);
        }
        catch(e) {
            console.error("Invalid json");
        }
    }

});

(Before you say that JSON.parse is the only thing that throws in js, did you know that even coercing a variable to a number e.g. +a can throw a TypeError?

However, the above code can be expressed much more clearly with promises because there is just one exception channel instead of 2:

var Promise = require("bluebird");
var readFile = Promise.promisify(require("fs").readFile);

readFile("myfile.json").then(JSON.parse).then(function(result){
    console.log(result);
}).catch(SyntaxError, function(e){
    console.error("Invalid json");
}).catch(function(e){
    console.error("Cannot read file");
});

Note that catch is sugar for .then(null, fn). If you understand how the exception flow works you will see it is kinda of an anti-pattern to generally use .then(fnSuccess, fnFail).

The point is not at all to do .then(success, fail) over , function(fail, success) (I.E. it is not an alternative way to attach your callbacks) but make written code look almost the same as it would look when writing synchronous code:

try {
    var result = JSON.parse(readFileSync("myjson.json"));
    console.log(result);
}
catch(SyntaxError e) {
    console.error("Invalid json");
}
catch(Error e) {
    console.error("Cannot read file");
}

(The sync code will actually be uglier in reality because javascript doesn't have typed catches)

share|improve this answer
    
So, how do you differentiate between a thrown error and a promise failure? –  Nick Jennings Oct 23 '13 at 10:25
    
@NickJennings If there was a programmer error in the synchronous code like console.log(resalt) (a typo) what would happen with the synchronous code? –  Esailija Oct 23 '13 at 10:40
    
An error would be thrown. However, with promises that results in a rejected promise. When, ideally, I would like to catch it in an uncaughException –  Nick Jennings Oct 23 '13 at 13:27
    
@NickJennings An error would only be thrown if you didn't have any try catch wrapping the synchronous code, in which case you would crash your server even on expected errors. I am referring to my synchronous code example, it would be insane to call readFileSync without a try-catch. –  Esailija Oct 23 '13 at 13:41
    
I get it, but I'm not in control of the module code, I need a bullet-proof (or near bullet-proof) was to catch any and all errors as close to the module as possible. HOWEVER - I need to differentiate between a promise.reject and a thrown error. Seems there's no way to do this... –  Nick Jennings Oct 24 '13 at 15:08

Promise rejection is simply a from of failure abstraction. So are node-style callbacks (err, res) and exceptions. Since promises are asynchronous you can't use try-catch to actually catch anything, because errors a likely to happen not in the same tick of event loop.

A quick example:

function test(callback){
    throw 'error';
    callback(null);
}

try {
    test(function () {});
} catch (e) {
    console.log('Caught: ' + e);
}

Here we can catch an error, as function is synchronous (though callback-based). Another:

function test(callback){
    process.nextTick(function () {
        throw 'error';
        callback(null); 
    });
}

try {
    test(function () {});
} catch (e) {
    console.log('Caught: ' + e);
}

Now we can't catch the error! The only option is to pass it in the callback:

function test(callback){
    process.nextTick(function () {
        callback('error', null); 
    });
}

test(function (err, res) {
    if (err) return console.log('Caught: ' + err);
});

Now it's working just like in the first example.The same applies to promises: you can't use try-catch, so you use rejections for error-handling.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.